NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Business & Economy
8:21 am
Fri February 29, 2008

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Laura Leslie reports for our North Carolina Voices series on transportation.

As Wake county grows, more and more major transit arteries are slowing to a crawl. Some say the answer is more roads. Others say it’s fewer cars. And Triangle commuters are literally stuck in the middle.

Business & Economy
6:36 am
Thu February 28, 2008

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Rose Hoban takes a look at the state of bicycle and pedestrian access in the area.

As a part of our ongoing coverage of Growth and Sustainability -- this week on Morning Edition we're featuring a North Carolina Voices series on Transportation. One form of transit stands out for it’s energy efficiency, health benefits and fun – that’s people-powered transportation. But in the Triangle, that can be tough. It’s a place that’s been built primarily for cars -- and many bikers says it’s just too dangerous to consider getting to work on two wheels or feet.

Business & Economy
8:02 am
Wed February 27, 2008

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

A newly proposed mass transit plan for the Triangle could link Chapel Hill to North Raleigh by bus and rail as early as 2020. It’s the suggestion of a 29 member regional organization called the Special Transit Advisory Group. As it stands right now, the proposal would greatly expand local and regional bus service, and add some form of rail transit later on.

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Business & Economy
7:58 am
Wed February 27, 2008

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Eric Hodge speaks with Mitchell Silver, the Director of Planning for the City of Raleigh.

Raleigh is growing. That statement is not news to anyone who's tried to get across town at rush hour. More people often does mean more traffic and longer commutes. As a part of our on-going coverage of growth and sustainability -- today we begin a North Carolina Voices series that looks at how the Triangle area will meet the transportation needs of a rapidly growing population. We begin with Eric Hodge's conversation with Mitchell Silver, the Director of Planning for the City of Raleigh.