Food Trucks

The Farmery at American Tobacco
Leoneda Inge

There’s a movement in the Triangle to reinvent the grocery store.  A prototype of this new urban market is open for business at American Tobacco in Durham.  It’s called The Farmery

The urban market is made out of a converted 20 foot by eight foot shipping container with living wall planters hanging outside.  The concept of The Farmery is to grow and sell at the same site.

“Almost every person that walks by asks us a question, when, where, why, how, what’s this for?” 

Dogs wait in line for treats from the Waggin' Wagon.
courtesy of McKinney

The Triangle has some of the state’s most sought-after flavors: a recent slew of James-Beard Award semifinalists and Durham’s newest title, “Tastiest Town in the South,” have people chatting happily about the region’s good tastes.

Leoneda Inge

In Raleigh, on the edge of downtown, there’s a coffee truck that causes many customers to do a double-take.  The women pouring ‘cups of Joe’ are wearing fishnets, lingerie and other sexy attire.  The truck is appropriately called 'Cup O Jane.'  The entrepreneurs who started this risque coffee service were looking for options after a lay-off.  And if there’s one thing for sure, even in a down economy, sex sells.

Triad Roundup

Oct 16, 2012

Food trucks are all the rage when considering cuisine and Greensboro wants to get in on the trend. The city is conducting a limited trial of food trucks to see how well they fare. Plus, the long-time mayor of High Point isn't seeking re-election, and five candidates are vying for the position. Host Frank Stasio gets a Triad news roundup from Greensboro Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii.

A limited number of food trucks will be allowed in part of downtown Greensboro this fall.

The Greensboro City Council voted 7 to 2 last night, in favor of a pilot program that will run during October and November. Ten supporters told the Council they believe food trucks will offer more affordable choices to students and employees downtown. No opponents of the measure spoke at the meeting.

Pie Pushers
Leoneda Inge

The Food Truck scene in Durham is credited with helping to grow the area’s image as a top food destination.  Durham officials are now trying to find a way to update its mobile vending code and keep the food truck business vibrant.

Leoneda Inge:  The City of Durham has been working on changes and updates to its 10-year-old mobile vending code for several months.  But when they announced those changes last week, the food truck community cried foul.  Grace Smith got a lot of those complaints.

The City of Durham is taking another look at its mobile vending rules.  And that means Food Trucks.

Leoneda Inge:  Becky Cascio and Mike Hackerd rolled out their Pie Pushers Food Truck about a year ago.  Cascio says it was a big step to make.

Becky Cascio:  My boyfriends a chef, he would love a restaurant but we’re not in a place in our personal lives, or financial or business knowing where we’re going to open a restaurant yet. So we saw this as a kind of stepping stone and Durham as a great spot to do it.

A motion presented by the Chapel Hill Town Council this week would make it easier for food trucks to set up shop in town. The latest proposal would require vendors to operate at least 100 feet from the entrance of a restaurant. That's similar to new food truck rules that went into effect this month in Raleigh. Food trucks are allowed in Durham under the city's zoning ordinances. The Chapel Hill Chamber of Commerce says food trucks are unfair competition for restaurants. Mayor Mark Kleinschmidt says the ordinance has other provisions designed to protect other businesses.

Food truck operators who hope to sell their creations in downtown Raleigh will soon know their fate. The City Council is set to vote today on a set of restrictions that will let them operate in the capital city. The public rift between food truck operators and bricks and mortar restaurant owners has been going on for more than a year. Some restaurant owners see food trucks as unfair competition. They say they pay high rents and property taxes, and fear that food trucks will set up outside their doors and siphon off customers.  Mike Stenke owns the Klausie's Pizza truck.