Democratic National Convention 2012

Charlotte leaders released a report calling the 2012 Democratic National Convention an economic success for the Queen City.

Gov. Bev Perdue addressing the DN
Dave DeWitt

The Democratic National Convention concluded in Charlotte last night. The three “official” days of the Convention took years of planning and millions of dollars to organize and stage. Its long-term effects on North Carolina's image and politics remain to be seen. But by almost all accounts, the Convention was a success for North Carolina’s largest city. Dave DeWitt spent the week at the Convention and produced this audio montage of the week’s “Carolina” moments.

Stella Adams of Durham
Leoneda Inge

The North Carolina Democratic delegation says it’s pumped up and ready to return home and motivate voters.

William Flyth of Brunswick County says since retirement he’s been busy working to register voters. The retired chemist says he’s ready to work even harder.

William Flyth:  I started get out the vote campaign among African American churches before I arrived and I plan to double down on that when I return home.

T-shirts for sale in downtown Charlotte during the DNC
Leoneda Inge

President Barack Obama is preparing to address the nation tonight and make his plea for “Four More Years.”  In 2008 – many analysts say it was the African American vote that put the president over the top in battleground states like North Carolina.  But is this constituency as “fired up” and “ready to go” in 2012?  Leoneda Inge reports from the Democratic convention in Charlotte.

The Democratic National Convention in Charlotte is especially exciting for a growing group of youth delegates.  Elena Botella says she’s pumped up!  The Duke University senior helped campaign for President Obama as a senior in high school but was too young to vote for him. Botella says there are a lot of students like her still involved.

The Democratic National Convention is in Queen City. And the streets of uptown Charlotte are crowded with delegates, politicians, reporters, police, and protesters. Tonight President Obama will take the stage and formally accept his party’s nomination. Host Frank Stasio will be joined by WUNC reporter Dave DeWitt to talk about the buzz at the DNC.

The city of Charlotte has opened up its arms to the Democratic National Convention, allowing the DNC to take over the uptown. An estimated 35 thousand people are attending the convention, and Charlotte is extending itself to accommodate them all. But many of the city workers are feeling stretched thin. And they are making demands for better working conditions. Host Frank Stasio will be joined by Dante Strobino, Field Organizer for UE 150North Carolina Public Sector Workers Union, and Chris Miller, a reporter for WBT who has been covering this story.

The second night of the Democratic Convention in Charlotte was highlighted by a rousing speech from former President Bill Clinton. But it also featured a number of North Carolina connections, including remarks by former Governor Jim Hunt. As Dave DeWitt reports from Charlotte, the event is showcasing the state and its largest city.

Durham's Delta Rae
deltarae.com

It's not just politicians speaking at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte this week. Organizers have lined up a range of musicians to help keep attendees entertained and fired up. Tonight's performers include the Foo Fighters, Mary J Blige, Earth, Wind and Fire and James Taylor. But Taylor isn't the only North Carolinian playing tonight. Durham-based Delta Rae has toured with many bands since releasing its debut album Carry the Fire earlier this year.

Denise Adams
Leoneda Inge

Tonight in Charlotte is the night President Obama accepts his nomination for a second term in the White House.  State Senator Floyd McKissick of Durham attended his first Democratic National Convention in 1988.  He says this convention is the most exciting and the most important.

Former Governor Jim Hunt told a story of North Carolina's growth in education at the Democratic National Convention last night.

Jim Hunt made history as the state's longest serving governor. Last night, he gave a bit of a history lesson. He told delegates where North Carolina was many years ago.

Jim Hunt: "Poor, rural, and rigidly segregated."

And how far it's come...with students learning more now than ever before.

A new children’s health initiative is using the London Olympics and the Democratic National Convention to promote better health on the ground. 

Children of all ages were pretty giddy.  They were meeting Olympic Gold medal Gymnist Gabby Douglas.

Jailiah Zanders:  "I was really excited to see the fab five and I was more excited about coming to see Gabby Douglas because she is one of my role models."

A variety of speakers came to address the North Carolina delegation to the Democratic Convention this morning. It was a national figure with North Carolina ties who really got the crowd pumped up.

Jesse Jackson is a proud graduate of North Carolina A&T. And he used much of his off-the-cuff speech to the 188-person state delegation to talk about the importance of the New South to President Obama's re-election. At the top of the list was getting out the vote.

The North Carolina delegation has a prime spot on the floor at the Democratic National Convention arena. Hosting the party's party is a big deal, and for delegates it's fun, and fascinating. We'll meet several North Carolina delegates today. Frank Stasio is joined by Andy Ball, Nick Carpenter, Margaret Katherine Alexander and Sam Spencer.

Governor Bev Perdue gave an early-evening welcome to delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte.

Perdue appeared yesterday -- not so much as a political force -- but as a gracious, and at times excited host.

Gov. Bev Perdue: "Do we know how to have a party? Go Democrats!"

She struggled with a strained voice through most of her five minutes on stage. Still she quickly settled into the party's talking points. Perdue has always been an advocate for education.

Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx welcomed Democrats to his city for their convention last night. Many Democrats see the two-term mayor as a rising star in the party. He talked about his beginnings and his rise to become mayor of North Carolina's largest city. Foxx said Charlotte's development mirrors the message his fellow Democrats want to take from this convention.

 Barack Obama
Harvey Gantt

This week at the Democratic Convention in Charlotte, elected officials from this state will be in the spotlight. Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx and Governor Bev Perdue spoke last night, and former Governor Jim Hunt will get his chance later today.

It’s also a big moment for others who paved the way. Harvey Gantt was the first black mayor of Charlotte. He also ran twice against Jesse Helms for the U.S. Senate. And without the trails he blazed in the second half of the 20th century, this convention, and his adopted state, would be very different.

[Audio transcript]

NC Democratic Delegates Ready To Go

Sep 4, 2012

The Democratic National Convention is underway in Charlotte. As Dave DeWitt reports, the state's delegates are raring to go.

G.K. Butterfield: "These conventions are about energizing your vote and winning elections!"

Dave DeWitt: Democratic Congressman G.K. Butterfield fired up the delegation at a breakfast this morning. The state's 188 delegates and alternates heard from elected officials on the importance of this week in Charlotte, and of taking their enthusiasm out into the field once the convention is over.

U.S. Senator Kay Hagan…

Charlotte, NC is the host city for this year’s Democratic National Convention. That means thousands of supporters, protesters, reporters and delegates have poured into the Queen City in anticipation of President Barack Obama accepting his second party nomination.

Dr. Scott Poppen
Leoneda Inge

Downtown Charlotte was packed yesterday with locals and thousands of guests in town for the Democratic National Convention.

The Johnson C. Smith University Marching Band kicked off the massive Carolina Fest street party. Dawne McCain lives in Charlotte. She enjoyed all the foot traffic coming by her jewelry booth during the festival.

The Democratic Convention begins today in Charlotte. The Democrats picked the city because they believed North Carolina would again be a crucial battleground state – and they hoped the convention would give them a boost in trying to win it for President Barack Obama. But at least according to one poll, the President trails Republican Mitt Romney in North Carolina. The Democrats are hoping to use the new demographics of the South to defy the pollsters.

UNC Freshman Vibhav Kollu
Leoneda Inge

The 2012 Democratic National Convention gets underway in Charlotte tomorrow.  And the North Carolina delegation will be one of the state’s most diverse ever.  There are more delegates of color, and for the first time there is an auxiliary group for Lesbian-Gay-Bi-Sexual and Trans-gendered delegates. 

[Audio Transcript]

It’s the beginning of the school year and college students are everywhere on the U-N-C Chapel Hill campus.   And it’s clearly campaign season.

NC DNC Protests
Dave DeWitt

The Democratic National Convention officially begins tomorrow in Charlotte. But the event began yesterday for some. Police say two of the 800 or so who took to the streets to protest were arrested. Officials had prepared for as many as 10-thousand protestors. As Dave DeWitt reports from Charlotte, what the marchers lacked in numbers, they made up for in passion.

[Audio transcript]

Thousands of political activists, journalists and delegates soon will convene on Charlotte for the Democratic National Convention.  Charlotte’s “Extraordinary Event” ordinance remains a hot topic.

Leoneda Inge:  The North Carolina American Civil Liberties Union and the City of Charlotte have never been able to agree on all of the rules listed in the relatively new “Extraordinary Event” Ordinance.  Chris Brook, legal director of the state ACLU, is least fond of the rule prohibiting back-packs.

Charlotte Union Gets Ready For DNC

Jul 16, 2012

Work begins today on converting Time Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte into a suitable site for the Democratic National Convention. We hear all the time that North Carolina is one of the most anti-union states in the country and it's true there are few labor unions here. But some of the ones that are here will be out in force over the coming months preparing Charlotte for the DNC. WFAE's Julie Rose reports on one local union that plays a significant role in Charlotte year-round.

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