2012 Presidential Election

The Republican challenger to 7th District Democratic congressman Mike McIntyre has requested a recount. David Rouzer trails McIntyre by 655 votes, a number that's small enough for him to ask to have the ballots counted again. Now, all nine counties in the southwestern congressional district will start the process early next week. Gary Bartlett heads the State Board of Elections.

Mitt Romney won North Carolina last night. But the 15 electoral votes that went with it did not lead to the presidency, as Barack Obama was re-elected.  As Dave DeWitt reports, the presidential race in North Carolina came down to a slim, but significant, margin.

There’s a toll-free, non-partisan election hotline available for voters with Election Day questions or problems.

Leoneda Inge:  Faculty and staff at UNC’s law school will be fielding calls as part of the national advocacy protection initiative called “Election Protection.” The number to call is – 1-866-OUR-VOTE.  Elizabeth Haddix is senior staff attorney at the UNC Law Center for Civil Rights.  She expects a lot of calls.

The campaigns for President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney and the outside groups that support them spent almost $70 million on tv ads in North Carolina.

First lady Michelle Obama was in Charlotte this afternoon to help get out the vote for her husband. She reminded supporters waiting in a hangar at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport that President Obama won North Carolina in 2008 by only 14 thousand votes. Mrs. Obama said that's why every vote matters.

Michelle Obama: And it is all going to come down to what happens in just a few key battleground states like right here in North Carolina. Right here. When we win this state with your help and we'll be on our way.

Eric Hodge: Former President Bill Clinton visited Raleigh on Sunday. He was here to campaign for Barack Obama in what is shaping up to be a very tight race in North Carolina.

Social media, early voting, polls, the financial markets, even the weather, they are all factors in next Tuesday’s election. When Americans pick a president, we also pick our congressional delegations and numerous state and local officials, but getting people to pay attention to the races happening down the ballot from the president can be tough. Guest host Isaac Davy-Aronson will talk about why with Jennifer Wig, the assistant editor at the Raleigh Public Record; and Angie Newsome, the director and editor of The Carolina Public Press.

In 2008, it would have been difficult to go to a college campus in the United States and forget we had an election coming up. The young people brought out about 22 million votes to the election then, but will it happen again? Are people still fired up and ready to go on America’s campuses? And how connected to politics are today’s college students anyway?

The Obama and Romney Campaigns continue to fight for North Carolina's 15 Electoral College votes.

In 2008, Barack Obama won North Carolina, marking the first time the state went for the Democratic candidate in over 30 years. In fact, in the previous couple of elections, Republicans won with solid victories. George W Bush had double digit leads over Al Gore and John Kerry. So what happened in 2008, and can it be repeated?

Leoneda Inge

North Carolina Early Voters have been going to the polls in record numbers.  And political analysts predict the outcome in this state could look a lot like four years ago when the winner of the presidential race won by a hair.

In 2008, most of the 100 counties across North Carolina were definitively for Barack Obama or John McCain.  But there were a handful of counties where the electorate was split right down the middle.   President Obama won Caswell County, for example, by 337 votes.  

It’s one week until election day. Candidates for offices at all levels are crisscrossing the state, looking for any last stray votes they can find.   But the two major-party candidates for President, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, are not, as of now, scheduled to appear in North Carolina before next Tuesday.  However, that doesn’t mean their campaigns in the state are slowing down.


Voters in Wake County will decide the fate of a $200 million bond for Wake Tech Community College.

Your Land/My Land

Oct 18, 2012

Rarely do art museums cover presidential elections, but if you visit the Contemporary Art Museum in Raleigh, that’s exactly what you’ll get.

Jonathan Horowitz is a multimedia artist based in New York City. His latest piece, “Your Land/My Land” is on display in museums across the country. Horowitz describes the exhibit as an interactive space divided by the partisan line. Jonathan Horowitz joins host Frank Stasio to talk about Your Land/My Land.

First Lady Michelle Obama
Alletta Cooper

Michelle Obama made a campaign stop in Chapel Hill before joining her husband at last night’s presidential debate.  Even though President Obama’s approval numbers have fluctuated over the year – Mrs. Obama’s popularity has remained strong during the tight re-election campaign.  And yesterday’s rally is part of an effort to fire up volunteers to get voters to the polls early. 

One would think the Obama’s had a second home in North Carolina going by all the visits the First Lady has made in recent months.  People love Michelle Obama and her signature BIG hugs.

Some members of Congress were in the Triangle today to back their candidates for President.

Gurnal Scott: 2008 GOP nominee John McCain came to a Cary VFW post to ask veterans to vote for Mitt Romney. He said his worries about President Barack Obama began the night Mr. Obama beat him four years ago.

John McCain: I was concerned about obviously national security. We always are. But I wasn't as concerned as I am today. America is not leading. We are beset by enemies on all sides.

Election day is just a few weeks away, and candidates running for office are in the final stretch to get their supporters to the polls. Presidential and congressional candidates are spending a lot of money in these final weeks, much of it from outside interest groups seeking to get their favorites elected. And that’s happening at the state and local levels too.

Jessica Jones: With campaign season in full swing, it’s almost impossible to miss the political ads that are flooding the airwaves.

Michelle Obama at NC Central
Jessica Jones

First lady Michelle Obama was in Durham and Greenville yesterday to help get out the vote for her husband. With less than two months to go before election day, polls show the race is close between President Obama and his Republican opponent, Mitt Romney. Jessica Jones reports the Obama campaign is hoping younger voters will help the president win North Carolina a second time.

Stella Adams of Durham
Leoneda Inge

The North Carolina Democratic delegation says it’s pumped up and ready to return home and motivate voters.

William Flyth of Brunswick County says since retirement he’s been busy working to register voters. The retired chemist says he’s ready to work even harder.

William Flyth:  I started get out the vote campaign among African American churches before I arrived and I plan to double down on that when I return home.

T-shirts for sale in downtown Charlotte during the DNC
Leoneda Inge

President Barack Obama is preparing to address the nation tonight and make his plea for “Four More Years.”  In 2008 – many analysts say it was the African American vote that put the president over the top in battleground states like North Carolina.  But is this constituency as “fired up” and “ready to go” in 2012?  Leoneda Inge reports from the Democratic convention in Charlotte.

The Democratic National Convention is in Queen City. And the streets of uptown Charlotte are crowded with delegates, politicians, reporters, police, and protesters. Tonight President Obama will take the stage and formally accept his party’s nomination. Host Frank Stasio will be joined by WUNC reporter Dave DeWitt to talk about the buzz at the DNC.

The second night of the Democratic Convention in Charlotte was highlighted by a rousing speech from former President Bill Clinton. But it also featured a number of North Carolina connections, including remarks by former Governor Jim Hunt. As Dave DeWitt reports from Charlotte, the event is showcasing the state and its largest city.

A variety of speakers came to address the North Carolina delegation to the Democratic Convention this morning. It was a national figure with North Carolina ties who really got the crowd pumped up.

Jesse Jackson is a proud graduate of North Carolina A&T. And he used much of his off-the-cuff speech to the 188-person state delegation to talk about the importance of the New South to President Obama's re-election. At the top of the list was getting out the vote.

 Barack Obama
Harvey Gantt

This week at the Democratic Convention in Charlotte, elected officials from this state will be in the spotlight. Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx and Governor Bev Perdue spoke last night, and former Governor Jim Hunt will get his chance later today.

It’s also a big moment for others who paved the way. Harvey Gantt was the first black mayor of Charlotte. He also ran twice against Jesse Helms for the U.S. Senate. And without the trails he blazed in the second half of the 20th century, this convention, and his adopted state, would be very different.

[Audio transcript]

NC Democratic Delegates Ready To Go

Sep 4, 2012

The Democratic National Convention is underway in Charlotte. As Dave DeWitt reports, the state's delegates are raring to go.

G.K. Butterfield: "These conventions are about energizing your vote and winning elections!"

Dave DeWitt: Democratic Congressman G.K. Butterfield fired up the delegation at a breakfast this morning. The state's 188 delegates and alternates heard from elected officials on the importance of this week in Charlotte, and of taking their enthusiasm out into the field once the convention is over.

U.S. Senator Kay Hagan…