Weekend Edition Sunday

Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians.

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Author Interviews
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Painful Path To Fatherhood Inspires Poet's New Collection

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 1:00 pm

Douglas Kearney's new book of poetry, Patter, is not something you pick up casually. It demands a lot from its audience — one reviewer wrote that the book's readers must be "agile, adaptive, vigilant and tough."

But the payoff is worth it. Kearney takes his readers into an extremely private struggle, shared with his wife: their attempt to conceive a child. The poems trace a journey through infertility, miscarriage, in vitro fertilization and, finally, fatherhood.

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Music Interviews
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

'SNL' Music Director Writes A Finnish 'Prescription'

Lenny Pickett has played in the SNL band for 29 years.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 4:10 pm

You may not immediately recognize the name Lenny Pickett. But if you've watched Saturday Night Live in the last 30 years, you've heard him.

The curly-haired saxophonist is there, wailing front and center, every week as the host enters the stage. He's been with the house band for nearly 30 years, and the show's musical director since 1995.

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Sports
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Spurs Could Settle NBA Championship On Sunday

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

Slate.com's Mike Pesca looks at the odds of the Miami Heat staging a comeback to beat the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA championship in a chat with NPR's Scott Simon.

The Sunday Conversation
6:34 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

A Christian Climate Scientist's Mission To Convert Nonbelievers

Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist and the director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. She is also a devout Christian.
Courtesy of Katharine Hayhoe

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 5:56 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Last week, the Obama administration announced historic regulations to limit carbon dioxide emissions. Policies to address climate change have been a tough sell among some Republicans on Capitol Hill, but also in many Christian congregations around the country.

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Sports
4:04 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

The World Cup Reminds Us That All The World's A Soccer Field

Children play soccer in the village of Limon in the Peten region of northern Guatemala.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 6:34 pm

The global reach of soccer never ceases to amaze me. I travel all over the world, sometimes to incredibly remote areas. More often than not, when I get there, somebody is kicking around a soccer ball.

It doesn't matter if it's Asia or Africa or Central America. Kids make a goal out of a couple of backpacks, throw out a ball and the game is on. The "ball" could be a knotted towel or a tennis ball or a tattered leather shell that's barely holding air.

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National Security
3:53 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

If The NSA Can't Keep Call Records, Should Phone Companies Do It?

Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., questioned whether phone companies would retain calling data.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 6:34 pm

Perhaps the most controversial spying program revealed by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden was the agency's hoarding of Americans' phone records.

Congress wants to change that program.

The House has passed legislation that would end the NSA's bulk collection of Americans' calling data and let phone companies hold the records instead.

As a Senate panel found last week, that proposal could run into trouble.

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Health
11:46 am
Sun June 8, 2014

For Addicts, There May Be Another Road To Wellness

The Betty Ford Center, an alcohol and drug rehabilitation clinic, is famous for its intensive rehabilitation that takes patients out of their regular lives. New thinking in the medical community, however, advocates treating addiction as a chronic illness that requires lifelong care.
Eric Thayer Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 6:34 pm

For decades, inpatient rehab has been one of the go-to treatments for substance addiction. Nearly two million Americans seek treatment for addiction each year, but there's a movement in the medical community to change how we perceive the condition — and how to treat it.

The most famous of of rehab centers is the one named after former first lady Betty Ford, who was addicted to alcohol and painkillers.

"My family saw the problem and they got professional help to come in and help them do what we refer to as an intervention," she told CBS News.

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Middle East
12:47 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

What Elections? Syrian Opposition Rejects Assad's Expected Win

A mock election poster depicts Syrian President Bashar Assad as Mafia boss Don Corleone, with token candidates kissing his hand.
Ahmed Jalal/Kafranbel Syrian Revolution

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:02 pm

Tuesday's elections in Syria are sure to result in another term for President Bashar Assad, even as the international community says his regime is responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians.

The opposition is railing against his inevitable triumph.

At a demonstration Friday by some of the 1 million Syrians who have fled into neighboring Lebanon, the view on the election was clear.

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The Sunday Conversation
11:57 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Tiananmen Survivor Looks Back At China's 'Lost Opportunity'

Shen Tong was a 20-year-old student in Beijing during the Tiananmen Square massacre.
Courtesy of Teresa Lin

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

This week marks 25 years since the massacre at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. In 1989, Chinese security forces conducted a widespread crackdown on pro-democracy protesters that left hundreds — some say thousands — dead. But months before the standoff, protesters saw no sign of coming violence.

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National Security
11:55 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Was Negotiating With The Taliban The Only Way To Free Bergdahl?

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Rep. Mike Rogers is critical of negotiating with the Taliban, but an exchange took place to free Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Rogers, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee.

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