The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

 Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

Get a daily show update, and special news.

Gun wall featuring rifles and assault riffles.
Michael Saechang - flickr.com/photos/saechang

Craig Stephen Hicks, the man accused of killing three young people in Chapel Hill this February, could face the death penalty. A Durham County Superior Court judge ruled Monday that the prosecution brought forth enough incriminating evidence to make him eligible for a death sentence.

UNC Press

The work of Native American author and Methodist preacher William Apess went largely unnoticed from his death in 1839 until the 1970s, when historians compiled his writings.

The writings turned out to be an eloquent collection of musings about the dynamics between Native Americans and white Americans, written by a man who had ancestry from both groups. 

  A new biography, “The Life of William ApessPequot” (2014/UNC Press), traces Apess' search for his identity as a mixed race American in the 19th century.

Rex Miller

Tennis legend Althea Gibson emerged from South Carolina to break color barriers in professional tennis.

In 1956, she became the first person of color to win a Grand Slam tournament, and went on to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open the following year. 

She became a champion despite the rules of the segregation era, a time when country clubs would not allow her to dress in their clubhouses. 

The new documentary “Althea” provides a glimpse of how she did it.

The State of Things is headed back to Greensboro's Triad Stage on April 14th for a live broadcast of the show. 

Here's a preview of what we'll be talking about on the show...

Congressman David Price
price.house.gov

U.S. Rep. David Price (D-NC) has been in the middle of conversations in Washington about limiting Iran's nuclear capabilities.

As a member of the House Subcommittee on Homeland Security, Rep. Price has been pushing for the agreement the Obama Administration announced last week to deter Iran from developing a nuclear weapon. 

It sets parameters that supporters say will yield a final agreement by this summer. Critics say it does not go far enough, calling for more sanctions on Iran or more Congressional control over the deal.

Chad Stevens

Last weekend marked the fifth anniversary of the Upper Big Branch mine disaster in West Virginia—the nation’s worst coal mine disaster in decades. Massey Energy, one of the largest American coal companies, ran the mine, and its CEO Don Blankenship has since been indicted on charges that he deliberately concealed health and safety violations at the mining site.

Johannesburg, South Africa
Franklin Pi / Flickr Creative Commons

In 1977, authorities in South Africa threw Thokozile Matilda Masipa in prison for protesting the country's apartheid system.

After the system collapsed, Judge Masipa became just the second black woman to sit on South Africa's High Court.

And she was in the international spotlight last year when she presided over the trial of Oscar Pistorius, the Olympic runner who was convicted of culpable homicide in the death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.

Judge Masipa's dramatic transition is just one story of a justice system that once had unjust laws.

Patrik Henry Bass is from Laurinburg, North Carolina and now he's the editorial projects director for Essence Magazine.
http://www.essence.com/

Patrik Henry Bass has spent the last 49 years searching for the extraordinary moments in life. 

As a child he found those moments in the books he devoured at the library—the stories he read carried him far beyond his hometown of Laurinburg, North Carolina. His love of literature led him to a career in journalism. Today he's an award winning writer and the editorial projects director of Essence Magazine.Host Frank Stasio talks with Bass about his life journey and the many careers that led him to his dream job in New York City as a curator in the literary world. 

Image of UNC-Chapel Hill's Battle Hall building.
UNC-Chapel Hill Library

In 1915, former UNC President Kemp Plummer Battle sent a sealed box to the North Carolina Historical Society that contained two items: a letter and a Montgomery Ward catalog.

He wanted these objects to serve as an impetus for reflection on the past at two distinct points in the future—1965 and 2015. In 1965, Chancellor Robert B. House honored the request with an essay detailing major changes he had witnessed in the past 50 years. But this year, the UNC-Chapel Hill History Department is taking a more playful approach. They have asked four faculty members from distinct backgrounds to reflect on changes in American society from their perspective—from a look at leisure in America to an examination of modern-day advertising.  

Bradley McDevitt

Americans over the age of two watches an average of 34 hours of television week. But before TV, Americans turned to the radio for news and entertainment. People would gather round and listen to exciting tales like War of the Worlds or The Origin of Superman. And now radio drama is making a coming back with new shows and podcasts. Students from Carolina Friends School are creating a new radio drama, The Old House  

Preview their first episode:

Pages