The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We are a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1-877-962-9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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Nedda Ibrahim

More than 100,000 Iraqi refugees have resettled in the United States in the past decade. But for the most part their stories are underreported and their life experiences are invisible to the wider American public. An art exhibit on view at William Peace University this weekend tries to change that by shining light on the work of 10 refugee artists whose work represents the rich and storied history of Iraqi art, and the diverse experiences of Iraqi refugees settled in the Americas.

Craig Duffy / Flickr

From "The Godfather" series to "Pulp Fiction," some of the greatest films of all time are about crimes and the people who commit them.

Movie lovers are drawn to fascinating characters like Scarface and Hannibal Lecter. Hollywood has driven good people to love bad characters for generations.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about listeners' favorite crime films in the next edition of "Movies on the Radio."

An image of  Katharine Wright sits beside Wilbur, ready for her first takeoff at Pont-Long in France in 1909.
Special Collections and Archives, Wright State University

Note: this is a rebroadcast from May 20, 2015

The state of North Carolina has many claims to fame, but there is likely none more popular or controversial than the slogan on the state license plate: “First In Flight.” The phrase commemorates the spectacular achievement of brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright who piloted their first flight in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in 1903.

When Dawn Dreyer was diagnosed with Bipolar II disorder, her therapist suggested that she make drawings as a way to cope with her depression.

The drawings evolved into a comic strip about a superhero called Bipolar Girl and Kacey the Wonderdog, who are in constant battle with The Creature, a villain who represents shame, depression and perfectionism. 

Most kids who grow up playing catch in the backyard dream about making it to the major leagues one day. For minor league baseball players, they are one step away to that dream. The Durham Bulls are one of the more well-known minor league teams thanks to the classic movie "Bull Durham."

For the team's players, life on the diamond includes regimented routines, long stints on the road and a chance to make it to the professional level.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

The U.S. Department of Justice says North Carolina's House Bill 2 violates the Civil Rights Act. It's the latest in the fallout from HB2 and could threaten billions of dollars in federal education funds.

Meanwhile, two different polls find conflicting results in North Carolinians' support of the law. And Donald Trump is assured the Republican nomination for president.

Political analysts are speculating about who might be Trump's running mate, and whether the establishment wing of the GOP will stand behind Trump in November. 

An image of Terence Blanchard
Henry Adebonojo

Jazz trumpet player and composer Terence Blanchard has worn many hats. As a kid growing up in New Orleans, he played alongside childhood friend Wynton Marsalis. In the 1980s he performed alongside jazz great Art Blakey, and in the 1990s, Blanchard began scoring films for director Spike Lee. Today he continues to develop his jazz style with his band The E-Collective.

An image of jazz vocalist Charenee Wade
Charenee Wade

Jazz vocalist Charenee Wade began singing when she was 12 years old living in Brooklyn. She was inspired by artists like Sarah Vaughn and Christian McBride.

Her latest album is a collection of covers from Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson called “Offering: The Music of Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson.” 

A Duke Energy power plant and coal ash ponds outside Asheville.
Zen Sutherland

Committees in the state House and Senate are weighing a measure that would prevent state agencies from issuing certain health warnings on drinking water.

An image of Crystal Sanders
Crystal Sanders

In 1965, a Head Start program called the Child Development Group of Mississippi offered an alternative education for children in low-income communities. It also gave working-class black Mississippians a chance to secure jobs outside of the local white power structure.

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