The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We are a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1-877-962-9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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Image of Eugene from the new opera Body Politic
Scott Bump

North Carolina’s House Bill 2 has been making national headlines for the past two months and has inspired a wide range of social action. There have been both pro and anti-HB2 rallies on Jones street, businesses have left the state, and performers have canceled appearances in protest. The law inspired a different response in two UNC School of the Arts alumni who were inspired to bring their artistic work to the state.

A Duke Energy power plant and coal ash ponds outside Asheville.
Zen Sutherland

Two environmental groups could be on the hook for $10 million if they want to continue their battle against Duke Energy. Last week’s ruling by the state Utilities Commission against The Climate Times and North Carolina Waste Awareness and Reduction Network (NC WARN) used a state law provision that has never been used before. The money is slated to cover costs incurred by Duke Energy because of the delay caused by the appeals process.

'Boy Erased'

May 18, 2016
An image of author Garrard Conley
Colin Boyd Shafer

Growing up in a small town in Arkansas, Garrard Conley dealt with strict social codes on what it meant to be man and a Christian. He was outed as gay to his parents at the age of 19.

Alex Prolmos / Flickr Creative Commons

The latest numbers from the Pew Research Center show that the number of Americans who say they believe in God has declined in recent years. And millennials are much less likely than older Americans to belong to any religious faith.
 

But despite these trends, psychiatrist and researcher Harold Koenig argues that science shows that religious belief is good for mental and physical health.

An image of singer Beyonce
AP Images

Pop culture icon Beyoncé delivered a powerful message when she released her visual album "Lemonade" last month.

The work is a pop culture phenomenon and alludes to infidelity while portraying strong messages of black feminism. Meanwhile, as Beyoncé reclaims her personal narrative as a celebrity icon, the forthcoming film "The Birth of a Nation" reclaims the story of the Nat Turner slave rebellion.

Bill Ferris has been a leading documentarian of southern culture for more than five decades. His work has preserved the work of blues musicians, painters, writers and many more.
Marcie Cohen Ferris

Note: This program is a rebroadcast from Monday, December 7. 

When Bill Ferris meets someone, he usually asks, “Where are you from?”

The simple question prompts an important answer for the folklorist. For Ferris, a sense of place is integral to one's identity, and there is hardly a more influential and complex place in shaping identities than the American South. 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next installment of Movies on the Radio, The State of Things is asking, what is your 'forbidden film'? This could be a movie you weren't allowed to watch growing up, or a movie you don't want your children to see. 

Did you sneak into the theater as a kid to watch "Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom"? Or, as a parent, did you hide "Bambi" from your kids because of it's traumatic violence? 

State of Things Host Frank Stasio hosts a broadcast at the Duke Chapel on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 to commemorate the chapel's reopening.
Duke Photography

Duke University has reopened the iconic chapel at the center of its Durham campus after a $19 million renovation.

Crews have been working for a year to restore the limestone walls and ceiling that define the chapel's Gothic architecture. 

In a special broadcast at Duke Chapel, university archivist Valerie Gillispie told WUNC’s "The State of Things" the chapel has served as an institutional icon at Duke for nearly 90 years.

A SolarBee
Medora Corporation

The Department of Environmental Quality has pulled the plug on SolarBees.

DEQ says it's removing the devices from Jordan Lake. SolarBees have been churning water at several spots on the lake in an attempt to reduce algae blooms, but a report from DEQ says there has been no improvement in water quality. 

The agency is reevaluating other measures that would limit runoff from the surrounding area, but developers are pushing back. 

An image of Duke anthropology professor J. Lorand Matory
J. Lorand Matory

Ethnic identity can be shaped by cultural practices and heritage. But in his new book, Stigma and Culture: Last-Place Anxiety in Black America (The University of Chicago Press/2015)

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