The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

 Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

Get a daily show update, and special news.

Each month WUNC's The State of Things travels to Greensboro for a live show at Triad Stage's UpStage Cabaret. The next show is Tuesday, May 19. The live broadcast starts at noon, but please arrive by 11:45 a.m. to be seated. Please RSVP if you plan to attend.

We'll be joined by:

Grand Power K100
Wikipedia

A bill in the North Carolina House could change gun regulations in the state. Proponents say the measure would give more consistency to licensing. Opponents, including some law enforcement agencies, say the changes would allow private sellers to skip registration processes. Also in the headlines: yesterday, in federal court, Duke Energy pleaded guilty over charges stemming from the 2014 coal ash spill. The deal means the company will pay $102 million in fines and restitution. Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC reporters Jorge Valencia and Dave Dewitt about the latest.

Image of author Katharine Ashe with a fan at a romance convention.
Katharine Ashe

North Carolina is home to a strong writing community. The state’s writing world has flourished in part because of an equally-strong literary ecosystem of publishers, independent bookstores, and readers. The inaugural Read Local Book Festival celebrates this literary ecosystem in downtown Durham this weekend with workshops, author dinners, and more.

Stock photo of Steph Stewart and The Boyfriends in field.
Roxanne Turpen (c) 2014

Steph Stewart grew up in the foothills of western North Carolina surrounded by Appalachian folk music.

The sounds resonated with Stewart and she began creating porch folk music mixed with Americana.

Missing Men
Pixabay

As a teenager in Maryland, Dwayne Betts showed promise. The high school student made the honor roll and demonstrated sharp wit.

But Betts grew up in an environment not conducive to success. He recalls three of his classmates being killed. Others went to prison.

“The expectation wasn’t necessarily that we would go to prison,” Betts said. “But we lived in a climate and an environment in which these things were happening every day and nobody was confronting what it meant.”

Chuck Lewis
American University

Chuck Lewis has had a long career as an investigative journalist. He has worked for national news shows, including CBS News' "60 Minutes," and he helped to create the Center for Public Integrity. 

But in the decades since he started digging for the truth, the reporting industry has suffered a serious decline in investigative reporting.

Fewer news outlets are spending the time and money for investigations in favor of daily news blurbs, breaking news coverage, or entertainment.

A picture of the UNC and GSK press conference.
WUNC

UNC-Chapel Hill announced a partnership this week with pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline to work on a cure for AIDS.

Scientists say what once was a lofty goal is now more realistic, thanks in part to UNC's already-extensive AIDS research. 

GSK and UNC will create a company called Qura Therapeutics to oversee more research at UNC laboratories, with an eye on producing a cure within the next 30 years.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Triangle Business Journal reporter Jason deBruyn about the details of the partnership.

Image of Eric Pickersgill's art installation
Eric Pickersgill

For some artists, making art is about creating something distinct from everything else that came before it. But in a new exhibit on view at The Ackland Art Museum, 11 artists explore the flip side of that artistic impulse. Their work raises questions about the value of creating new objects and explores the ethical and environmental implications of this work.

The office of The Sun magazine in Chapel Hill. The Sun celebrated its 40th anniversary last year.
Rachel J. Elliott

“The Sun” magazine has been a Chapel Hill institution for more than four decades. It started in 1974 when editor and publisher Sy Safransky borrowed $50 to get the magazine started. Safransky had no idea where he would find funding to keep the production afloat, but he was confident that his vision for a “personal, political, and provocative” magazine would bring together readers and writers alike.

Airplane!
Wikipedia

From silent film to slapstick comedy, humor has been a staple of the silver screen since the dawn of modern cinema. Listeners share their favorite funny scenes from a wide range of movies from “Young Frankenstein” to “Airplane." Host Frank Stasio talks with North Carolina Museum of Art film curator Laura Boyes and North Carolina State University film professor Marsha Gordon about the funniest moments in film.

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