The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook or Tumblr.

Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

Get a daily show update, and special news.

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The State of Things
8:00 am
Fri February 25, 2011

Songs Of Water

Credit www.songsofwater.com

Host Frank Stasio talks with the band members about their unique orchestral style and gets treated to a live performance from Songs of Water at the Triad Stage UpStage Cabaret in Greensboro.

Greensboro-based instrumental ensemble Songs of Water blends sounds and rhythms from around the world with a Tar Heel touch. The band’s tunes are influenced by the dominant percussion heard in West African, Indian and Middle Eastern music and their songs are driven by melodic use of a hammered dulcimer.

The State of Things
11:22 am
Thu February 24, 2011

Kind of Blue

Kind of Blue, a play by Kuamel Stewart

Stewart talks with host Frank Stasio about his creative approach to playwriting, which fuses musical technique with social critique.

A new play that explores male identity draws inspiration from jazz music. Playwright Kuamel Stewart’s “Kind of Blue” asks theater goers to consider different perceptions of masculinity with a narrative set in 1940s New York City. Stewart, a senior communications major at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is the first African-American undergraduate to have a full-length production performed on a UNC mainstage. “Kind of Blue” debuts this week at the Historic PlayMakers Theatre.

The State of Things
10:20 am
Thu February 24, 2011

Defining Mental Health

DSM IV

Host Frank Stasio explores the mental illness controversy.

Controversy is brewing in the psychiatric world over proposed revisions to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the DSM. Experts are working on revising the DSM for an upcoming fifth edition. Detractors of the process say it's too secretive and beneficial to pharmaceutical companies. They also worry that changes to the DSM would lead to some healthy people being classified as mentally ill. Supporters of the proposed revisions say that the DSM classifications are out of date and changes are necessary to treat mental illness earlier and more effectively.

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The State of Things
11:48 am
Wed February 23, 2011

All Things Must Pass

Credit www.ifnotforyou.org

Host Frank Stasio talks with Roan about the event and about Harrison's inspiring music.

A group of local musicians will get together on Saturday night at the Cat's Cradle to celebrate the 40th anniversary of George Harrison's landmark solo album. The event is the brainchild of Toby Roan, a Triangle man who found solace and inspiration in listening to "All Things Must Pass" while his mother was battling cancer.

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The State of Things
11:42 am
Wed February 23, 2011

The Art Of The Deal

Book cover, Great Negotiations

Host Frank Stasio talks with Stanton about what we can learn from the intimate details of negotiating.

History has been shaped as much by the conversations and bargains that ended or avoided war as by war itself. In his new book, "Great Negotiations: Agreements that Changed the Modern World” (Westholme Publishing, 2010), author Fredrik Stanton tells the stories of eight feats of diplomacy. The book begins with Benjamin Franklin bluffing his way to the Franco-American Alliance in 1778 and ends with the faltering but fruitful summit between U.S. President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in Reykjavik.

The State of Things
11:37 am
Wed February 23, 2011

Donald Rumsfeld Reimagined

Book cover, Donald

Host Frank Stasio speaks with Martin about the book, which offers a look at the consequences of torture and imprisonment without writ of habeas corpus.

In their slim but fascinating novel, "Donald" (McSweeney's, 2011), Durham writer Eric Martin and his co-author Stephen Elliott explore the provocative question: What if former U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld were abducted from his home without warning and imprisoned without being told why? How would the man who oversaw the creation of prisons such as those at Guantanamo Bay and Bagram react if he were looking from the inside out?

The State of Things
3:50 pm
Tue February 22, 2011

Your Digital Afterlife

Book Cover - Your Digital Afterlife

Carroll and Romano join host Frank Stasio for an explanation of how to care for a digital estate.

Your digital life has a life of its own. Whether you’re on Facebook, Flickr, Twitter or linked in to any social network server, it’s likely that your online existence will outlive you. Authors John Romano and Evan Carroll started thinking about what happens to people’s online presence once they die. They found that much of the information – from emails and blog postings to financial records and photographs – is at risk of being lost forever in cyberspace. Their book, “Your Digital Afterlife” (New Riders Press/2010), tells readers how to preserve and protect their online legacies.

The State of Things
12:19 pm
Tue February 22, 2011

The Sunset Limited at Triad Stage

The Sunset Limited
Credit triadstage.org

Host Frank Stasio takes a look at the story, the language and the characters of the play.

The latest production at Greensboro’s Triad Stage is Cormac McCarthy’s “The Sunset Limited,” a production with a small cast – just two men – and an extended conversation about big ideas including life, death, afterlife, faith and fate.

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The State of Things
11:37 am
Tue February 22, 2011

Radio Shangri-La

Book Cover - Radio Shangri-La

Journalist Lisa Napoli was burned out. Then she met a handsome stranger at a party who pointed her in the direction of Bhutan, the tiny Himalayan hamlet famous for being remote and blissful.

Journalist Lisa Napoli was burnt out. She was tired of living in Los Angeles, tired of working the overnight shift for Marketplace Radio and tired of feeling like she didn't have enough of what she wanted in life. Then she met a handsome stranger at a party who pointed her in the direction of Bhutan, the tiny Himalayan hamlet famous for being remote and blissful. There, success is measured, not in Gross National Product, but in Gross National Happiness. Napoli arrived in Bhutan to help set up the first non-government owned radio station when the king peacefully abdicated the throne and the country transitioned into a constitutional monarchy. Her new book, "Radio Shangri-La" (Crown/2011) documents her journey to Bhutan and happiness, Bhutan's journey to democracy and the journey of a friend who left Bhutan for America only to find out that happiness was back at home. Napoli joins host Frank Stasio to talk about her travels and being a reporter in a place with no bad news.

The State of Things
9:35 am
Mon February 21, 2011

Meet Ping Fu

www.geomagic.com

Growing up in China, Ping Fu watched soldiers murder two of her teachers, lost her parents to reeducation camps and suffered rape. Today she's the CEO of Geomagic, a 3-D software company based in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park.

Growing up in China, Ping Fu watched soldiers murder two of her teachers, lost her parents to re-education camps and suffered rape for trying to rescue her sister from drowning. She survived her childhood only to be imprisoned during college for her research into China's history of infanticide. She was deported and made her way to the United States where she became the creator and CEO of Geomagic, a 3-D software company based in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park. Fu's technology is used by NASA, NASCAR and many others. 

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