The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook or Tumblr.

Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

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The State of Things
1:25 pm
Mon April 11, 2011

Meet Jimmy Creech

Book cover, 'Adam's Gift' by Jimmy Creech

Jimmy Creech had been an ordained United Methodist minister for 14 years before he came to understand the plight of homosexuals within his congregation. A parishioner, whom he calls Adam, came out to him in 1984, revealing the hurt and rejection he felt at the hands of a church that condemned him. Creech became a crusader for homosexual rights within the church, and that crusade led the Methodist church to strip him of his ordination.

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The State of Things
12:37 pm
Fri April 8, 2011

KidzNotes

Kidznotes

Katie Wyatt, the Executive Director of KidzNotes joins host Frank Stasio to discuss El Sistema and the KidzNotes program.

KidzNotes provides under-served children free classical, orchestral music training to combat poverty and build character. It operates in Durham and is based on the El Sistema model from Venezuela, which has been transforming the lives of Venezuelan school children through classical music since 1974.

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The State of Things
12:24 pm
Fri April 8, 2011

Occult America

Mitch Horowitz

Host Frank Stasio talks to Mitch Horowitz.

The occult has been with America since the nation’s inception, thriving in the parlors of mediums, even reaching the White House. So says Mitch Horowitz in "Occult America: The Secret History of How Mysticism Shaped Our Nation" (Bantam/2009).

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The State of Things
12:14 pm
Fri April 8, 2011

The Eldest Jackson

Rebbie Jackson

Rebbie Jackson joins host Frank Stasio to talk about her advocacy, her music and her family.

The Jackson family holds an important place in American music.  Its eldest child, Rebbie, has had a successful career as an entertainer that included her 1984 hit song, "Centipede," which was written by her brother, Michael Jackson. 

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The State of Things
11:52 am
Thu April 7, 2011

Imperfect Birds

Anne Lamott

Host Frank Stasio talks to Anne Lamott about the scourge of drugs, the hardships of adolescence and the endlessly inspiring American family.

Anne Lamott is famous for her revealing, poetic, funny books about motherhood, faith and America. Nearly everything she writes is autobiographical, including her newest book, “Imperfect Birds” (Riverhead Books/2010), which is out in paperback and features a teen named Rosie who goes from being a likable, model student-athlete to lying, stealing and using drugs.

The State of Things
11:40 am
Thu April 7, 2011

What's Coming At Full Frame

Full Frame Documentary Film Festival
Credit Full Frame

Frank Stasio talks with a few of the state's directors about their films.

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival's annual celebration of the documentary brings artists from around the world to Durham. This year, the lineup includes a rich variety of offerings from filmmakers based in North Carolina.

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The State of Things
12:02 pm
Wed April 6, 2011

Reading The Language Of Rape Culture

How we articulate ideas about rape sheds light on American perceptions of violence, gender and race.

Most cases of rape and sexual assault never make the news. But in recent weeks, horrific stories about victims of sexual violence have created national headlines. Some language used in the reporting of these cases and public reactions to them has caused controversy. How we articulate ideas about rape sheds light on American perceptions of violence, gender and race. Host Frank Stasio discusses the language and the law surrounding rape with a panel of guests including documentary filmmaker Aishah Shahidah Simmons; Mark Anthony Neal, a professor of African and African-American Studies at Duke University; Melissa Harris-Perry, associate professor of politics and African-American Studies at Princeton University; and Mary R. Block, associate professor of history at Valdosta State University.

The State of Things
12:23 pm
Tue April 5, 2011

Two Takes On Textile Mill History

conemillvillages.weebly.com
Credit conemillvillages.weebly.com

Host Frank Stasio talks with Filene and two of his public history graduate students, Dale Pennington and Sarah McNulty.

The North Carolina Museum of History has mounted an exhibition of the photography of Lewis Hine. His bleak, black-and-white prints paint a vivid picture of young people, some not yet teenagers, covered in the lint and grime of the state’s textile mills. Meanwhile, University of North Carolina at Greensboro public history students, under the guidance of associate professor of history Benjamin Filene, have created an online project called “Community Threads: Remembering the Cone Mill Villages.”

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The State of Things
12:12 pm
Tue April 5, 2011

The Shape of the Table

playwright David Edgar
Credit www.contemporarywriters.com

Host Frank Stasio will talk about the play with Edgar and Burning Coal Theatre Company artistic director Jerome Davis.

In David Edgar’s play, "The Shape of the Table," a country is falling to pieces. Its people are protesting and demanding a new government while the old government tries to hold on to power. It could be a story ripped from today's headlines, but it premiered in 1990 — a year after the fall of the Berlin Wall. The narrative deals with an unnamed eastern European country as it transitions from Communism to democracy.

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The State of Things
12:44 pm
Mon April 4, 2011

Meet Maureen Quilligan

Maureen Quilligan
Credit Chris Hildreth, Duke Magazine

Host Frank Stasio talks with Maureen Quilligan about women in history, literature and everyday life.

As a scholar of Renaissance literature, Maureen Quilligan made a name for herself by re-examining the role of women during the Elizabethan age through the lense of art and literature. As the head of the English Department at Duke University, she helped stabilize a respected institution during a tumultuous time. And as a resident of Hillsborough, North Carolina, Quilligan has helped support the small town's independent merchants, including sewing lamp covers for a new book shop.

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