The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook or Tumblr.

Or, join our live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

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The State of Things
1:36 pm
Fri April 22, 2011

The Watery Part Of The World

Book cover, ''The Watery Part of the World''

Parker joins host Frank Stasio to talk about creating a work of historical fiction and why island folk are the best secret keepers.

Aaron Burr, Vice President for Thomas Jefferson’s cabinet, fathered only one child that survived past infancy. Her name was Theodosia Burr Alston, a well-educated and accomplished woman who was highly respected in her time. In the winter of 1812, Theodosia mysteriously disappeared on a ship voyage from South Carolina to New York.

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The State of Things
1:29 pm
Fri April 22, 2011

Humble Tripe

Shawn Luby of Humble Tripe

Band members Shawn Luby, Jess Shell, and Stud Green join host Frank Stasio in the studio.

Durham-based band Humble Tripe is the musical project of Shawn Luby. After years spent playing classical guitar in competitions, Luby retired from the world of music at the age of 20. He moved from Kansas to North Carolina, working first at a nonprofit, then as a clinical lab scientist. Once he entered his 30s, his desire to play music returned and he formed Humble Tripe with his friends.

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The State of Things
12:22 pm
Thu April 21, 2011

Cooking In The Moment

Andrea Reusing - ''Cooking in the Moment''

Reusing joins host Frank Stasio to discuss her new book.

Andrea Reusing's Chapel Hill restaurant Lantern is loved and respected by sophisticated foodies from around the world. So it's a bit of a surprise that her first cookbook is not full of recipes from Lantern’s menu. Instead, the book is a seasonal guide to a year's worth of unintimidating, easy-to-shop for, easy-to-make, fresh, local meals.

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The State of Things
12:10 pm
Thu April 21, 2011

The Music Of Wade Mainer

Wade Mainer

Wade Mainer, a banjo master and bluegrass legend, turns 104 today. Host Frank Stasio celebrates Mainer's life and legacy with Dick Spotswood, Sarah Bryan, and David Holt.

Just about every bluegrass musician has been directly or indirectly influenced by Wade Mainer. Mainer, a master of the banjo, taught himself to play his instrument of choice as a child and developed an innovative two-finger picking style. That style, combined with Mainer’s strong vocals earned him popularity as a performer and recording artist in the 1930s and 1940s.

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The State of Things
12:40 pm
Wed April 20, 2011

A Vanishing Dialect

Host Frank Stasio will talk to Wolfram about its origins and decline.

North Carolina is home to a variety of interesting dialects, but none is quite so unique as the one found along the Outer Banks. Sometimes called the Ocracoke Brogue, the dialect is often mistaken for British, and it is rapidly declining as tourism inundates the area with a more diverse array of speakers. Walt Wolfram, North Carolina State University English professor and Director of the North Carolina Language and Life Project, has been studying the Outer Banks dialect for almost 20 years.

The State of Things
12:34 pm
Wed April 20, 2011

The State Of Water

Book cover, ''The Big Thirst''

Fishman joins host Frank Stasio to discuss what he believes to be the beginning of a worldwide water revolution.

North Carolinians are no strangers to drought but there are many other factors that lead to water insecurity. Water pollution, contamination, rainfall levels and population growth all dictate the amount of water that is available to a community. Charles Fishman, author of the new book, “The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water” (Free Press/2011), says we should be prepared for the day when water will no longer be inclusively cheap, clean and plentiful.

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The State of Things
11:58 am
Tue April 19, 2011

Death Penalty Data

Robinson joins host Frank Stasio to share more information about his report and talk about how this data could affect policymakers’ ideas about the death penalty.

North Carolina halted executions about five years  ago. Capital punishment is still legal in the state, but a dispute over the lethal injection process led to a de facto moratorium on the death penalty. Since then, the state’s murder rate has fallen, and investigations of the State Bureau of Investigation’s crime lab have
exposed mishandling of evidence in criminal cases. Matthew Robinson, a professor of government and justice studies at Appalachian State University, has been researching those facts and other data about the death penalty in North Carolina. His findings reveal that capital punishment is more costly than life imprisonment and that race and gender frequently factor into death penalty sentencing.

The State of Things
11:53 am
Tue April 19, 2011

30 Americans

Soundsuit
Credit www.ncartmuseum.org

Host Frank Stasio discusses the exhibit with his guests.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being labeled an “African-American artist”? That question is at the heart of a new exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Art. It features the works of 31 contemporary artists - photography, video, sculpture and more – with each piece revealing a bit about the experience of blacks in America.

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The State of Things
11:36 am
Tue April 19, 2011

Ten Miles Past Normal

Ten Miles Past Normal

Host Frank Stasio talks with young adult novelist France O'Roark Dowell about the struggle of fitting in as a teenager.

Durham writer Frances O'Roark Dowell tackles the awkwardness of high school in her new young adult novel "Ten Miles Past Normal" (Atheneum/2011). The main character is Janie, a ninth-grader who once thought living on a farm would be great. She proposed the idea to her parents when she was in elementary school, and they embraced it. Now she is an outcast who sometimes goes to school with hay in her hair or goat droppings on her shoes.

The State of Things
11:06 am
Mon April 18, 2011

Meet Donald Davis

Donald Davis
Credit www.blairpub.com

Davis joins host Frank Stasio to discuss how ministering and storytelling go together and what it's like to grow up in the mountains and retire by the sea.

Donald Davis was born and raised in Waynesville, North Carolina. His people go back in Haywood County to the 1700s on both sides. He left home to attend Davidson College and Duke Divinity School. He was a Methodist minister for years before retiring to become a full time storyteller. He now lives on Ocracoke Island and spends most of the year traveling the country visiting festivals and leading workshops in the fine art of oral communication. Davis has committed some of his stories to paper in the new book, "Tales From a Free-Range Childhood" (John F. Blair/2011).

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