The State of Things

M-F 12 Noon, M-Th 8p, Sat 6a

We bring the issues, personalities, and places of North Carolina to you. We're a live show, and we want to hear from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow us on Facebook or Tumblr.

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State of Things
12:51 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Remembering Josef Vašíček

Josef Vašíček's jersey
Credit indyweek.com

When the Carolina Hurricanes won the Stanley Cup in 2006, the team had a young, Czech player on the ice named Josef Vašíček. “Big Joe,” as ‘Canes fans called him, was drafted by the team in 1998 and before his career in North Carolina was over, Vašíček was a key member in the Hurricanes’ success. The 30-year-old player died in a plane crash in Russia on Wednesday, along with 26 members of the Yaroslavl Lokomotiv, the hockey team Vašíček joined in 2008.

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State of Things
12:45 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Looking for History

History comes alive before Tom Magnuson's eyes. All he has to do is take a walk in the woods. Manguson is a visiting scholar at the University of North Carolina’s Institute for Southern Studies, and founder of the Trading Path Association. The group trains amateur archeology and history enthusiasts how to identify potentially significant historic sites, especially in rural and suburban areas.

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State of Things
12:19 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

John Vanderslice

Hopscotch Music Festival
Credit hopscotchmusicfest.com

San Francisco indie musician John Vanderslice is well-known for his exhaustive, comprehensive, and lengthy approach to recording music. Legend has it that Vanderslice spent 4,000 hours working on one album. But his latest studio effort called “White Wilderness,” a collaboration with the Magik*Magik Orchestra, was completed in just three days to the surprise of fans and music critics. Vanderslice is in North Carolina to perform at the 2nd annual Hopscotch Music Festival in Raleigh.

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State of Things
11:46 am
Thu September 8, 2011

9/11 Ten Years Later

This Sunday marks the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, and Americans will be inundated with commemorations. Amidst that flood of images and stories, how can people find an intimate and meaningful way to reconnect with the events of a decade ago? At the same time, is there a collective way to memorialize a tragedy that changed the country, but changed each of us in different ways? What roles are played by artists, scholars, and theologians?

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State of Things
11:29 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Drug Use and Sex Trafficking

NC Harm Reduction Coalition
Credit nchrc.net

Decades after the beginning of the war on drugs, America's desire for illicit substances has not abated. North Carolina has become a hot spot of both drug activity and sex trafficking, and state leaders are coming together to address the problem. The conference, “Reducing Harm and Building Communities: Addressing Drug Use in the South," will be held in Durham tomorrow and Friday at RTI International. Host Frank Stasio talks about drug use, sex work, and the conference with Jill Brenneman, a Raleigh sex worker and program coordinator for Sex Workers without Borders; Robert Childs, executive director of the NC Harm Reduction Coalition; and Lieutenant Colonel Marty Sumner, deputy chief of the High Point Police Department.

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State of Things
11:07 am
Wed September 7, 2011

Rethinking Aging

Dr. Nortin Hadler
Credit unchealthcare.org

Dr. Nortin Hadler says the human body has an end date – about 85 years old – and thinking you’re going to live much beyond that is mostly wishful thinking. But the health care industry wants to convince you otherwise, he says. They want you getting heart bypass surgery in your 80s, being treated for cancers that won’t kill you and worrying about a host of problems that aren’t as dangerous as they seem.

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State of Things
1:22 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

Fresh Buzz for the Charlotte Hornets

NBA
Credit www.nba-live.com

Before North Carolinians became Caniacs or Panthers’ fans, back when NASCAR was the only professional sports most Tar Heels cared about, the Charlotte Hornets enjoyed a few seasons in the sun. A new video game from 2K is celebrating the legacy of the 1992/93 Hornets. Host Frank Stasio talks about the new game and the old team with Owen Good, who writes about sports video games for Kotaku, the video game site of Gawker Media, and Dane Huffman, who covered the Charlotte Hornets for The News & Observer in Raleigh.

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State of Things
1:15 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

Dark Tangos

Dark Tangos
Credit www.lewisshiner.com

Lewis Shiner’s latest novel is a blend of historical fiction, romance and crime, and it all revolves around tango. Protagonist Rob Cavenaugh is a recent transplant to Buenos Ares. On the dance floor, he falls in love, but his relationship exposes him to Argentina’s dark history. Thousands of citizens disappeared in the country’s dirty war, and Rob’s new crush was somehow involved. Host Frank Stasio talks with Shiner about his new novel, "Dark Tangos" (Subterranean Press/2011).

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State of Things
1:10 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

Daughters of the Dust

Daughters of the Dust

Filmmaker Julie Dash made history with her movie, “Daughters of the Dust.” In 1991, it became the first full-length feature by an African-American woman to receive a general theatrical release. The critically acclaimed movie tells the story of the Peazant family, a clan of Gullah Island dwellers who are divided by the decision to leave their isolated life and move to the mainland. “Daughters of the Dust” will be screened at The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University on Thursday as part of the new “Seeing Black” film series.

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State of Things
9:00 am
Mon September 5, 2011

Some College, No Degree

Some College, No Degree

Everyone knows there's a high school dropout problem in the United States, but the college dropout rate is worse. Nearly a quarter of American adults started college but didn't finish - about 37 million people. Now they're being left behind in an economy increasingly focused on workers with degrees. American RadioWorks producer (and former WUNC News Director) Emily Hanford examines why so many people start college but don't graduate, what's being done to bring them back, and whether a college degree is the answer for everyone.

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