Morning Edition

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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform challenge and occasionally amuse.  Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country. Eric Hodge and the WUNC News team bring you regional updates through the morning.

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Business
5:17 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Regulators Approve Deal Between Delta, Virgin Atlantic

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

News now, of another airline agreement, that's been approved by regulators. This latest deal sees Delta Airlines and Britain's Virgin Atlantic partnering on flights and marketing.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Law
4:46 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Prosecutors Begin Their Case Against Trayvon Martin's Killer

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Sanford, Florida today, prosecutors continue making their case against George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who last year shot and killed teenager Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman is charged with second degree murder. In opening statements yesterday, prosecutors described Zimmerman as a vigilante who wanted to rid his neighborhood of people who didn't belong there.

Zimmerman's lawyers say he acted in self-defense. From Sanford, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

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Business
4:46 am
Tue June 25, 2013

IRS Systematically Targeted 'Progressive' Groups Too

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

The scandal at the Internal Revenue Service is becoming more of a muddle. We're learning more this morning about which groups were targeted for extra scrutiny. Turns out both conservative groups and progressive groups were on the so-called Be on the Lookout List at the IRS. Meanwhile, the man currently leading the agency says an internal investigation has found no evidence of intentional wrong doing.

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Code Switch
2:59 am
Tue June 25, 2013

As Demographics Shift, Kids' Books Stay Stubbornly White

At a San Jose, Calif. library, a young reader browses a shelf of books featuring a variety of main characters: ducks, hens, white kids, black kids. Libraries help drive demand for children's books with nonwhite characters, but book publishers say there aren't enough libraries to make those books best-sellers.
San Jose Library Flickr

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:14 am

When it comes to diversity, children's books are sorely lacking; instead of presenting a representative range of faces, they're overwhelmingly white. How bad is the disconnect?

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Music
2:03 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Chuck Leavell: The 'Fifth' Stone Speaks

Chuck Leavell plays alongside Rolling Stones member Ronnie Wood.
Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 11:10 am

Some believe that there are only four Rolling Stones, but then some say there's a fifth: keyboardist Chuck Leavell. He's been on tours with the band for more than 30 years — but that hasn't been his only gig. At 20, he was asked to join The Allman Brothers Band.

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Shots - Health News
12:03 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Top Medicare Prescribers Rake In Speaking Fees From Drugmakers

How does the doctor decide what to write on the prescription pad?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:38 pm

When the blood pressure drug Bystolic hit the market in 2008, it faced a crowded field of cheap generics.

So its maker, Forest Laboratories, launched a promotional assault on the group in the best position to determine Bystolic's success: those in control of prescription pads. It flooded the offices of health professionals with drug reps, and it hired doctors to persuade their peers to choose Bystolic — even though the drug hadn't proved more effective than competitors.

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Law
11:55 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Supreme Court Justices Rule On Affirmative Action Case

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. The U.S. Supreme Court sent back to an appeals court, a high-profile affirmative action case this morning. In a seven to one decision, the country's highest court effectively told the lower court to go back and do it right. For more, we have NPR's legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg at the Supreme Court. And, Nina, what exactly did the court say?

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Law
11:55 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Supreme Court Sends Affirmative Action Case Back To Lower Court

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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National Security
11:55 am
Mon June 24, 2013

For Edward Snowden, A Convoluted Path To Possible Asylum

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Russia's decision to allow Edward Snowden into the country was just one more step in what appears to be a convoluted path to possible asylum. As we've just heard, Snowden is not on the flight to Cuba he was scheduled to take from Moscow. But more on the latest we are looking at, we are joined in the studio by NPR's Dina Temple-Raston. Good morning.

DINA TEMPLE-RASTON, BYLINE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: OK. Do we know where Snowden is at this minute?

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World
6:49 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Artist's Fake Diploma To Be Sold At Auction

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. You can spend tens of thousands on a liberal arts degree, or just buy a fake diploma. The artist David Hockney's fake diploma is expected to sell at auction this week for up to $27,000. He created it in 1962 when he was denied a real degree by the Royal College of Art because he refused to write a final essay. And who know? The work of a famous artist might end up worth more in the long run than a real diploma.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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