Morning Edition

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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform challenge and occasionally amuse.  Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country. Eric Hodge and the WUNC News team bring you regional updates through the morning.

Here's the latest from Morning Edition:

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Environment
3:01 am
Wed July 10, 2013

In Montana Wilds, An Unlikely Alliance To Save The Sage Grouse

Bryan Ulring (left), ranch hand Graham Fulton (right) and Nature Conservancy ecologist Nathan Korb (center) install a pipe on a new well dug for the cattle Ulring manages for J Bar L Ranch. The ranch is working with The Nature Conservancy to try to preserve sage grouse habitat.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 1:46 pm

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Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Football Needs A Guardian, Not A CEO

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks during a news conference at the NFL football spring meetings in Boston two months ago. Can he save our American sport from becoming a gladiator game?
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:03 am

Aaron Hernandez, who appears to be a monster, can no more be held up as representative of football than can Oscar Pistorius be fairly presented as an archetype of track and field.

But still, Hernandez does become a culminating figure. The sport is simply more and more identified with violence, both in its inherent nature and in its savage personnel.

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Around the Nation
8:17 am
Tue July 9, 2013

NTSB Investigators To Talk More To Cockpit Crew

For the latest developments in the investigation into the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco, Renee Montagne talks to the head of the National Transportation Safety Board Deborah Hersman. Of the four pilots, investigators have only talked to two so far. More interviews will be conducted Tuesday.

Europe
7:28 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Mr. Darcy Statue Emerges From Hyde Park's Serpentine Lake

The 12-foot statue embodies the character played by Colin Firth in the BBC adaption of Pride and Prejudice. Brits recently ranked his spontaneous swim the most memorable TV drama moment.

Around the Nation
7:23 am
Tue July 9, 2013

The Family That Spits Together, Stays Together

The 40th Annual International Cherry Pit Spitting Championship was just held in Michigan. Matt Krause won when a pit flew nearly 42 feet. His brother Brian has won nine times, and his dad has won the title 15 times.

Author Interviews
6:44 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Comedian Aisha Tyler Talks About Flipping Off Failure

Tyler says as a kid she stood out because of her height, her glasses, and her vegetarian lunches.
Aisha Tyler

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 12:50 pm

Comedian and actor Aisha Tyler brews beer, plays video games, tells dirty jokes, drinks fancy booze and ... writes books.

She has a new one out this week: Self-inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humilation. We sat down in the NPR studios over a mug of 18-year-old scotch to talk about her most embarrassing moments on the road to success. (No, really, we did. Listen to us toast.)

For those of you wondering who Aisha Tyler is, here's a quick breakdown (to be read quickly):

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National Security
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Snowden's Leaks Puts National Security Agency In A Bind

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As Larry just said, the Privacy Board can now openly debate NSA surveillance programs, thanks to the revelations from Edward Snowden. And this is just one example of how Snowden's leaks have put the NSA in a bind. To talk more about this we're joined by NPR's justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Carrie, thanks for coming in.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Thank you.

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National Security
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Privacy Board To Scrutinize Surveillance Programs

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:49 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Just after Edward Snowden first leaked secrets about government surveillance, he gave an interview to two journalists while he was hiding out in Hong Kong. Yesterday, The Guardian newspaper released more of that interview with Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras.

GREENE: In that video, Snowden discusses why he exposed the surveillance programs.

(SOUNDBITE OF INTERVIEW)

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Around the Nation
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Navigating The Skills To Successfully Land A Jet

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:35 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And to help us understand more about what that cockpit crew may have been facing, we reached David Esser. He's an airline transport pilot and a professor of Aeronautical Science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida.

Good morning.

DAVID ESSER: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: Now even if as we just heard, accidents like this are a result of a chain of events, it's clear in this case that something did go wrong during the landing. Describe for us the difficulty of landing an aircraft like this.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
3:48 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What Egyptian State TV Says About The State Of Egypt

In an image from a video broadcast on Egyptian state TV, President Mohammed Morsi addresses the nation on July 2 — his final speech before the military deposed him.
Ismael Mohamad UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:23 am

It sounded like a slip of the tongue. As millions of Egyptians took to the streets calling for President Mohammed Morsi to step down, state TV anchor George Heshmat casually used the word "revolution" instead of "protests."

This signaled that state TV was beginning to assert its independence from a government that was never a good fit for it anyway. It was clear that something had changed at the voice of the state — even before Morsi was pushed from power.

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