Morning Edition

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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform challenge and occasionally amuse.  Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country. Eric Hodge and the WUNC News team bring you regional updates through the morning.

Here's the latest from Morning Edition:

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Parallels
2:57 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Citing Dignity, Greek Workers Take Over Factory

Makis Anagnostou, a worker and union leader, bottles lavender-scented fabric softener at VIO.ME, a former tile materials factory that went bust and has been revived by its staff as a collective making environmentally-friendly detergent.
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 7:33 am

The financial crisis in Greece has devastated the country's manufacturing sector, which has lost more than 30 percent of its jobs in the past three years. But at one factory in an industrial center in the north, workers have taken matters into their own hands.

Inside the cavernous factory on the outskirts of Thessaloniki, eight middle-aged men are filling bottles with a vinegar-based fabric softener that's scented with fresh lavender.

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StoryCorps
10:03 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

For A Young Paramedic, Saving A Life Meant A Lifelong Bond

Rowan Allen (right) saved Bryan Lindsay's life in 1991, after an accident left Bryan, then 7, with a severe head injury.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 7:33 am

Twenty-two years ago this summer, Bryan Lindsay was riding his bike when he was hit by a van and almost killed. He was 7 years old.

Rowan Allen was the paramedic on the scene that day. "When the call came in, it was just before my shift ended that day," Rowan recalls on a visit to StoryCorps in New York. "The first instinct was, 'Oh man, right before we get off.' And then the dispatcher comes back on the air and he says, 'Child struck.' That just changes everything. And luckily, we were just a couple blocks away.

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All Tech Considered
4:59 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

The Reply To Email Overload? Prioritize — Or Turn It Off

Steven Cohen, the billionaire hedge fund manager of SAC Capital Advisors, didn't see a key email because he gets 1,000 messages a day, his lawyers say.
Jenny Boyle AP

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 7:33 am

In the high-profile civil case against Wall Street titan Steven Cohen, federal authorities accuse the hedge fund head of allowing insider trading within his ranks. Cohen's lawyers offered up a defense fit for the digital age: They claim he didn't see a key, incriminating email because he gets too many messages — an estimated 1,000 a day, and opens only 11 percent of them.

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Business
12:18 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Government Charges SAC In Insider Trading Case

Federal prosecutors have filed criminal charges against one of the most famous and successful hedge funds in the world. The government alleges that SAC Capital Advisors is criminally responsible for insider trading that went on at the firm.

Around the Nation
5:58 am
Thu July 25, 2013

George H.W. Bush Shaves Head In Support Of Ill Toddler

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Former President George H.W. Bush has a new summer 'do. He shaved his head to show support for the son of one of his Secret Service agents. Two-year-old Patrick lost his hair from leukemia treatments. Bush and his wife lost a three-year-old daughter to leukemia nearly 60 years ago. A photo just released shows Patrick perched on Bush's knee with matching bald heads, blue shirts, and khakis. Bill Clinton tweeted: 41, you look great. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:56 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Believe In Fortune Cookie Predictions? After This, You Might

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

OK. Next time you open a fortune cookie, you might want to give the message careful consideration. Last week, after dinner out with his wife, William Johnson cracked open a fortune cookie. The little piece of paper inside told him: You will soon come into a lot of gold. The Southwick, Massachusetts man went out the next day, he bought a lottery ticket. He scratched it off, and the prize wasn't gold, but he could use it to buy a lot. He won a million dollars.

The Two-Way
5:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Steam And Groundwater Raise Concern At Japanese Nuclear Plant

Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) workers work on waste water tanks at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in the town of Okuma, Fukushima prefecture in Japan on June 12, 2013.
Noboru Hashimoto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:01 am

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Making Sense Of Cleveland's Good And Bad News

The new Cleveland Convention Center is hosting its first major event, the National Senior Games.
Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:13 pm

As Cleveland embraces national attention for everything from its booming arts and culinary scene to its redevelopment plans, it struggles with recent high-profile crimes. Some residents and tourists are left with news whiplash as they try to figure out what these diverging storylines say about the city.

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Collecting Taxes Among Detroit's Financial Troubles

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Detroit is broke. But a federal judge is holding hearings to determine whether Detroit is broke enough to qualify for bankruptcy protection. The court is examining whether the city has done everything possible to put more money in its coffers. Quinn Klinefelter of member station WDET reports one thing is certain - Detroit is struggling to bring into its coffers tax revenue.

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Train Derailment Kills Scores In Spain

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:08 am

At least 78 people have died and more than 140 others have been injured after a train derailment in Spain. The high-speed train, carrying 218 passengers plus its crew, left the tracks as it went around a curve near the city of Santiago de Compostela. David Greene talks to Lisa Abend, who reports for Time magazine, for the latest.

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