Morning Edition

M-F 5-9a

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform challenge and occasionally amuse.  Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country. Eric Hodge and the WUNC News team bring you regional updates through the morning.

Here's the latest from Morning Edition:

Local Host(s): 
Eric Hodge
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f7dce1c872f9d0bc2b97|5187f7d9e1c872f9d0bc2b8e

Pages

Shots - Health News
3:03 am
Tue September 17, 2013

For-Profit Online Insurance Brokers Gear Up To Sell Obamacare

Workers at the eHealth call center outside Sacramento, Calif., get ready to sell health insurance through the marketplaces created under the federal health care law. Sales start Oct. 1.
eHealth Inc.

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:34 am

When the Affordable Care Act was working its way through Congress, Gary Lauer was nervous. Part of the bill sounded grim. It said people could buy required health coverage online, but only through websites run by state and federal governments.

"That was going to pretty much delete us from the landscape," he says.

Read more
Parallels
3:02 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Japan's Rice Farmers See Trade Deal As Threat To Tradition

Rice farmers pull a harvest festival cart down country lanes in Narita city, Chiba prefecture. The area is home to Tokyo's main airport, but also has many agricultural areas.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

The Japanese city of Narita is best known to the outside world for its major airport that serves Tokyo, the nation's capital city.

Narita is also a rural area of Chiba Prefecture, however, with a long tradition of rice farming.

Toward the end of the summer, Narita's rice farmers gather to pray for bountiful harvests. They dance, play music and ride elaborate festival carts. From afar, the wagons appear to glide through a sea of lush green paddy fields as villagers pull them down Narita's placid country lanes.

Read more
Animals
7:52 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Earwax From Whales Keeps Record Of Ocean Contaminants

A blue whale (and human diver) swimming off the coast of Trincomalee, Sri Lanka, in April 2011.
Amos Nachoun Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 8:07 am

How often do whales clean their ears? Well, never. And so, year after year, their earwax builds up, layer upon layer. According to a study published Monday, these columns of earwax contain a record of chemical pollution in the oceans.

The study used the earwax extracted from the carcass of a blue whale that washed ashore on a California beach back in 2007. Scientists at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History collected the wax from inside the skull of the dead whale and preserved it. The column of wax was almost a foot long.

Read more
Around the Nation
10:57 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Several Reported Dead In Shooting At Navy Yard In Washington

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 12:20 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We will go to NPR's business news in a moment. Right now, let's get an update on what we do know about a shooting at the U.S. Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. today. We have to begin by being frank. What we do not know exceeds what we do. NPR's Jennifer Ludden is on the scene of that shooting today - or near it - and she's on line. And Jennifer, what have you been learning?

Read more
Around the Nation
7:09 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Mansfield Waits 121 Years For 2nd Night Game

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

In 1892, Mansfield University held the first night football game. Brand-new electric lights illuminated the field, just not very well. Squinting in the darkness, players tackled their own teammates and even the ref. Mansfield abandoned night games until this past Saturday, then the Pennsylvania school defeated Princeton. The athletic director says the 121-year pause between night games allowed time to work out the bugs.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
7:08 am
Mon September 16, 2013

United To Honor Free Tickets Generated During Glitch

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon September 16, 2013

'The Muslims Are Coming!' To Middle America

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A group of Muslim comics went on tour through parts of Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, as well as Arizona. Their mission was to help Americans equate Islam with funny, rather than fundamentalist. And that is the topic of a new documentary called, "The Muslims Are Coming."

NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji met up with the directors.

SHEREEN MARISOL MERAJI, BYLINE: Here's a quick taste of what happens when Muslim comics invade Middle America.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "THE MUSLIMS ARE COMING")

Read more
NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Engineers Begin Righting Wrecked Cruise Ship

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

The Costa Concordia is lying on its side in shallow waters off the west coast of Italy. It struck a reef 20 months ago when the captain steered too close to land. Thirty-two people died. On Monday, the task is to begin to slowly rotate the ship to an upright position, using a complex system of chains and underwater platforms and cables.

NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Weapons Inspector Points Out Challenges Facing Deal On Syria

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Let's get an assessment of the weekend deal between the United States and Russia on chemical weapons in Syria.

GREENE: David Kay inspected Iraq for weapons of mass destruction once after the Gulf War in 1991, and a second time after the U.S. invasion in 2003.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:22 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Calling Obesity A Disease May Make It Easier To Get Help

Differences in brain chemistry can affect an individual's likelihood of weight gain.
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:04 am

Under the Affordable Care Act, more insurance plans are expected to start covering the cost of obesity treatments, including counseling on diet and exercise as well as medications and surgery. These are treatments that most insurance companies don't cover now.

The move is a response to the increasing number of health advocates and medical groups that say obesity should be classified as a disease.

Read more

Pages