Here & Now

M-Th 1-3p & F 1-2p
Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young

Here Now hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young are thrilled to be a part of the WUNC lineup
Hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young are thrilled to be a part of the WUNC lineup
Credit WBUR

Here & Now is an exciting daily news magazine hosted by veteran journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson. The program is designed to reflect the fluid world of news as it's happening, with timely, smart and in-depth reporting and conversation. 

It's produced by NPR News, WBUR Boston and a consortium of 12 public radio stations that includes WUNC.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Tensions Continue To Rise Between US And Pakistan

Pakistan’s parliament will discuss the country’s ties to the U.S., after an American drone strike killed Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud last week.

Pakistanis reacted angrily, saying the strike violated its sovereignty.

“The two sides will continue to need each other and to continue to distrust each other,” Owen Bennett Jones, a BBC contributor based in Pakistan, told Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Twitter Looks To Its News Role In Upcoming IPO

Screenshot of Twitter feed.

Originally published on Thu December 4, 2014 3:26 pm

Expectations are high this week as Twitter gets ready to go public.

The company raised its initial public offering price yesterday to $25 a share, up from $23. That would put the company’s value at around$13.6 billion — almost 12 times the value of its projected 2014 sales.

Twitter has 230 million users and not all of them are following Lady Gaga or Justin Bieber. A new Pew study shows 8 percent of Americans use Twitter to get news.

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NPR Story
4:11 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

YouTube Launches Its First-Ever Music Awards

What if someone held an awards show with no red carpet, no fanfare, short speeches and it finished in under the projected running time?

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NPR Story
4:11 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Organization Seeks To Preserve Slave Dwellings

Joe McGill, of the Slave Dwelling Project, at Stagville Plantation in North Carolina. (Stagville Plantation/Facebook)

There are still plenty of physical reminders of slavery today. Among them: hundreds of former slave cabins across the country.

A group called the Slave Dwelling Project sets out to identify these mostly small, dilapidated structures and bring attention to their preservation by inviting people to sleep in them.

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NPR Story
4:11 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Adding Up The Cost Of Low Literacy Among Adults

Students participate in a health literacy class at Mary's Center, role-playing a visit to the doctor. (Kavitha Cardoza/WAMU)

For the past few days, NPR has been taking a look at the challenges facing the 30 million American adults who lack basic literacy skills.

In the final part of our series on adult education, Kavitha Cardoza of member station WAMU examines the economic and social impacts — not just on individuals, but on society as a whole.

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NPR Story
4:55 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

'Ender's Game' Director Says Focus On The Message, Not The Author

Asa Butterfield (left) plays Ender Wiggin and Harrison Ford (right) plays Colonel Graff in the new film "Ender's Game." (Richard Foreman Jr., SMPSP, © 2013 Summit Entertainment, LLC. All Rights Reserved.)
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NPR Story
4:55 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Microbiologist Says To Avoid The Flu, Go Outside

A microbiologist recommends spending time outside in order to avoid getting sick this flu season. (Maxwell GS/Flickr)

Want to avoid catching the flu or your co-worker’s cold this year? 

Get some fresh air and wash your hands with soap and water, microbiologist Jack Gilbert tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Gilbert says we’ve created an urban world complete with air conditioning, filtration and windows that don’t open, leading to an environment of homogeneous microbes.

Add a healthy dose of bacteria from the outdoors, and you may just be fine. Getting a dog could help, too.

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NPR Story
4:55 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Suspected Gunman In Custody After LAX Shooting

A still image from NBC LA shows a person being loaded into an ambulance at Los Angeles International Airport. (Joseph Weisenthal/Twitter)

Update 4:23 p.m.: Law enforcement officials identify LAX shooting suspect as 23-year-old Paul Ciancia.

Update 2:49 p.m.: Union official: TSA agent killed in LAX shooting.

Update 2:20 p.m.: Police say 3 shot, including TSA agent, by gunman with semi-automatic weapon at LAX.

A suspected gunman was in custody Friday following a shooting at Los Angeles airport that left multiple people wounded and disrupted flights nationwide.

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NPR Story
4:02 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Senate Democrats Pledge Support For Employment Non-Discrimination Act

Get Equal, a LGBT rights group, holds a march to pass ENDA in 2010. The bill has languished in Congress, but the Senate will take a vote on it as early as next week. (Matt Baume/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:35 pm

West Virginia Democratic Senator Joe Manchin says he’ll vote for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, known as ENDA, making him the latest Senate Democrat to throw his support behind the law that would ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity in the workplace.

The bill is now only one vote shy of a filibuster-proof majority. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said earlier this week that he will push for a vote as early as next week.

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NPR Story
4:02 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Wally Lamb Mines Childhood Memories For New Novel

Wally Lamb, whose latest book is "We Are Water," is pictured in the Here & Now studios. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 5:35 pm

In novels such as “I Know This Much is True” and “The Hour I First Believed,” best-selling author Wally Lamb explores how a traumatic incident continues to reverberate years afterward.

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