Here & Now

M-Th 1-3p & F 1-2p
Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young

Here & Now is an exciting daily news magazine hosted by veteran journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson. The program is designed to reflect the fluid world of news as it's happening, with timely, smart and in-depth reporting and conversation. It's produced by NPR News, WBUR Boston and a consortium of 12 public radio stations that includes WUNC.

Hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young are thrilled to be a part of the WUNC lineup
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NPR Story
2:47 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Why ESPN Reigns Supreme In Covering Sports

Ryan Phelan rehearses on the set of ESPN's SportsCenter at ESPN's headquarters in Bristol, Conn., Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. (Bob Child/AP)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:58 pm

ESPN is the champion of sports media. If you look at the numbers, the 34-year-old network does reign supreme when it comes to covering sports.

The network’s value is estimated between $40 billion and $60 billion — that’s at least 20 times bigger than the New York Times Company.

Just this month, more than four million people watched ESPN’s “NASCAR Spring Cup,” making it the top cable sporting event of the week.

So how does ESPN live up to its tagline of “The Worldwide Leader in Sports”?

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NPR Story
4:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

To Get Kids Into The Kitchen, Teach Them To Cook

Kids make "Little Lasagnas" from the cookbook "Chop Chop: The Kids Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family." (Carl Tremblay/Simon & Schuster)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:11 pm

Sally Sampson founded ChopChop magazine to get kids to eat healthier by getting them interested in cooking.

The magazine won a James Beard award earlier this year and this week, Sampson published the book “Chop Chop: The Kids Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family.”

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NPR Story
4:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Economic Independence Is Transforming India's Marriage Culture

(Meghdut Gorai/Flickr)

A rapidly changing world is altering the lives of millions of women.

In India, the rising economic wherewithal of a new generation of women is transforming an institution as old as the country itself: marriage.

NPR’s Julie McCarthy has this report on Indian match-making with a modern twist.

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NPR Story
4:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

European Union Emerges From Recession

After a record 18-month slump, the European Union is coming out of a recession.

Numbers released today show three-tenths of a percent growth for the second quarter of the year.

While that may not sound like a lot, it is a signal that a much-needed recovery to pull the eurozone out of its three-and-a-half-year debt crisis may be here.

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NPR Story
3:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Legendary Steinway Piano Company Set To Change Hands

(Wexner Center/Flicker)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:20 pm

The 160-year-old piano maker, Steinway, is set to change hands. Last month, a private equity firm emerged as the likely buyer.

That was until today, when hedge fund manager John Paulson made an offer of $500 million. The billionaire now looks set to take control of one of the oldest manufacturers in the country.

But, Steinway’s workers don’t think a change of ownership will mean much of a change for them.

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NPR Story
3:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Do Leaked Albums And Songs Hurt Or Help Artists?

An image from the cover of Lady Gaga's latest album, "Artpop." (Lady Gaga)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:20 pm

Katy Perry‘s new single “Roar” from her upcoming album “Prism” and Lady Gaga’s latest track “Applause” from her new album “ARTPOP,” both were leaked over the weekend. The artists and their labels have very different initial reactions.

Lady Gaga called upon fans to report leaks for removal, while Katy Perry simply tweeted “Looks like there’s a tiger on the loose!!!”

Ultimately, both songs were released early.

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NPR Story
3:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

When It's Not Alzheimer’s: Little-Known Illness Mimics Dementia

Jim Lampert, right, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, but his wife Terrie, left, found a specialist who diagnosed him with normal pressure hydrocephalus. (Screenshot from Boston Globe video)

The last thing most patients do when they receive an Alzheimer’s diagnosis is seek another diagnosis.

But research shows that up to 5 percent of dementia cases are misdiagnosed cases of a treatable but largely unknown condition called “normal pressure hydrocephalus.”

It is theorized that NPH arises from excess fluid building up in the brain. The cure is to drain the fluid with shunts.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Analyst: Utilities Challenged By Spread Of Solar

View of mountains and new solar panels at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah. The Refuge continues to pursue sustainable electricity production with the addition of the solar panels near the James V. Hansen Wildlife Education Center. (Jason St. Sauver/USFWS via Flickr)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:20 pm

Twenty-nine states, plus the District of Columbia, require utilities to source a certain percentage of their electricity from renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar.

Publicly, critics of solar and wind have discounted the notion that renewable energy could gain a foothold in the energy industry.

But there are reports that behind closed doors, the electric industry is talking about getting out in front of this disruption.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Utility Companies Push Back On Solar Incentives

Two workers install solar panels on a rooftop in Fort Dix, Texas. (U.S. Army Environmental Command/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:20 pm

The General Electric company has announced plans to scrap a $300 million solar panel factory in Aurora, Colorado. The facility would have been the largest of its kind in the country.

GE had earlier suspended work on the project, amid falling prices and a rising inventory of solar panels.

Meanwhile, more and more utility companies around the country are asking regulators to reconsider an incentive program that’s encouraged many people to invest thousands of dollars in rooftop solar electric systems.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt Violence Upsets White House Policy

Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, stand among debris and smoke in background as they confront Egyptian security forces trying to clear the smaller of the two sit-ins, near the Cairo University campus in Giza, Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013. (Imad Abdul Rahman/AP)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:20 pm

As the death toll mounts today in Egypt, it also upends the Obama administration’s delicate balance on the Egyptian crisis.

The White House has steadfastly refused to call the Egyptian army’s ouster and arrest of former President Mohammed Morsi a coup.

At the same time, the administration has urged the Egyptian military to move forward quickly with constitutional reform and free elections.

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