Here & Now

M-Th 1-3p & F 1-2p
Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young

Here & Now is an exciting daily news magazine hosted by veteran journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson. The program is designed to reflect the fluid world of news as it's happening, with timely, smart and in-depth reporting and conversation. It's produced by NPR News, WBUR Boston and a consortium of 12 public radio stations that includes WUNC.

Hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young are thrilled to be a part of the WUNC lineup
Credit WBUR

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Remembering The 1972 Olympic Massacre

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:56 pm

As the International Olympic Committee meets to decide whether Tokyo, Istanbul or Madrid will host the 2020 summer Olympics, we look back to a terrible moment in Olympic history.

On September 5, 1972, Palestinian terrorists stormed into the apartment where 11 Israeli athletes were staying in Munich.

Two men were killed and the other nine were taken hostage. By the time the crisis ended, all of them were dead.

American marathon runner Kenny Moore and his roommate Frank Shorter were staying in a nearby apartment.

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Middle East Expert Says Don't Rush To War With Syria

Fawaz A. Gerges is pictured in 2007. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:56 pm

Fawaz Gerges is a longtime observer of the Middle East and fears the United States is rushing to take military action in Syria.

Gerges, a professor of international relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, says Assad’s use of force and likely use of chemical weapons against his people should not be tolerated.

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Is This The End Of The College Boom?

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:56 pm

The Census Bureau reports that the number of students pursuing college degrees has fallen for the first time since 2006.

The greatest decline happened among students age 25 and older.

Derek Thompson, business editor for The Atlantic, joins us to explain what the statistics mean.

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NPR Story
4:24 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Do You Have A Twitter 'Accent'?

(MDGovpics/Flickr)

With 500 million users and 500 tweets a day, the social networking site Twitter has changed the way we communicate. It also changes the way we write.

This year alone there were more than 100 Twitter-based studies. One study found that tweets often use words and spellings  that are consistent with — and unique to — the user’s region, reflecting local accents and terminology.

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NPR Story
4:24 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Senate Panel Votes 10-7 To Authorize Force In Syria

From left, Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, Secretary of State John Kerry, and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, listen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013, during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Syria. (Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Update 3:30 p.m.: The Senate Foreign Relations Committee has voted 10 to 7 in favor of a resolution authorizing the use of force against Syria. No votes included Kentucky Republican Rand Paul, Florida Republican Marco Rubio and New Mexico Democrat Tom Udall.

There hasn’t been a formal debate about the use of military force in the U.S. Congress since the Iraq War.

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NPR Story
4:24 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Auto Industry Sees Growth In Summer Sales

Today is a good day in the car business. The summer sales season ended this Labor Day weekend, and automakers have released their sales figures.

The big car makers saw double-digit growth this August over the same time last year. It’s the best August since 2007 — before the economic collapse.

NPR’s Sonari Glinton joins us to discuss the most recent sales figures and what they mean for the industry.

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NPR Story
3:32 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Love Of Lego Extends Beyond Building Things

Sam Sullivan, 5, is pictured in the Here & Now studios. (Katherine Gorman/Here & Now)

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:13 pm

The world’s most valuable toy company, Lego, no longer deals in just multicolored plastic bricks.

Lego has created a multimedia empire that runs on fans not only using Lego to build things, but as the basis for creating entirely new projects.

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

CBS And Time Warner End Dispute, Blackout Ends

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:13 pm

CBS and Time Warner ended their public contract dispute yesterday, marking a nearly one-month blackout in eight major markets.

The agreement restored the CBS network and affiliated channels such as Showtime.

While the two sides didn’t release details of the agreement, CBS did win a significant increase in re-transmission fees for its content, as well as a large segment of control in its digital future.

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

The Rare Case Of The Military Execution

Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan sits in court for his court-martial in Fort Hood, Texas, in this Aug. 6, 2013, courtroom sketch. (Brigitte Woosley/AP)

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:13 pm

If Army Maj. Nidal Hasan is eventually executed, he will be the first person put to death by the U.S. military in more than 50 years.

Hasan, who was sentenced to death last week after being convicted of killing 13 people at Fort Hood in 2009, also faces what could be years of appeals, even though he did not really defend himself at his trial.

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NPR Story
4:07 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Nothing Went As Expected At The Box Office This Summer

(Roloff/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:55 pm

This has been the summer of some spectacular bombs at the box office, most notably “The Lone Ranger.”

But receipts overall were up. In fact, the box office gross is expected to set a record of $4.7 billion and films like “The Heat” and “The Conjuring” did surprisingly big business.

We look at the summer that was with Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr.

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