Here & Now

M-Th 1-3p & F 1-2p
Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young

Here Now hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young are thrilled to be a part of the WUNC lineup
Hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young are thrilled to be a part of the WUNC lineup
Credit WBUR

Here & Now is an exciting daily news magazine hosted by veteran journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson. The program is designed to reflect the fluid world of news as it's happening, with timely, smart and in-depth reporting and conversation. 

It's produced by NPR News, WBUR Boston and a consortium of 12 public radio stations that includes WUNC.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Wisconsin Is Latest State To Consider Fees On Electric, Hybrid Vehicles

Chris and Ellie Eichman purchased a Nissan Leaf electric car in 2012 -- the first sold in Wisconsin. Chris says a fee for his Leaf is reasonable, but he's irked by the fee he'd pay for his second car, a Prius, given that he already pays a gas tax when he fills up. (Susan Bence/WUWM)

Keeping up with road repair — and finding funds to pay for it — is a struggle for many states, particularly in places where winter weather takes a toll on highways and streets. Wisconsin’s transportation department faces a deficit and is looking for ways to raise $750 million over the next two years.

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NPR Story
3:37 pm
Fri January 2, 2015

Documenting The Evolution Of Hip Hop

Graffiti in the Bronx -- where DJs laid the foundations for hip hop in the 1970s. Brian Coleman has written what he calls the "invisible liner notes" of hip hop. Most hip hop wasn't heavily documented, like other musical genres -- leading to lapses in surveying the genre's evolution. (AquaLungBX/Flickr)

If you love a piece of music, chances are you want to know more about the musician. What event prompted them to write a particular song, or what happened in the studio during the recording — the good, the bad, and, of course, the ugly. At minimum, maybe you want to know who produced an album and who it’s dedicated to.

You can usually find this kind of thing on liner notes — the printed little pamphlets slipped inside a CD or vinyl cover.

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NPR Story
3:37 pm
Fri January 2, 2015

Is The Supermarket The Next Big Food Trend?

To get to the Time Warner Center Whole Foods Market, customers must descend via escalator through a food court. More supermarkets are adding a seating area to their floor plans. (michaelnyc/Flickr)

Yesterday on our program we talked to a restaurant in Kentucky that has a no-tipping policy — doing away with tipping and instead adding a service charge is one of new food trends that is starting to take off.

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NPR Story
3:37 pm
Fri January 2, 2015

What To Expect For The Stock Market In 2015

Broker distributor buyer at Quattro M. Securities Inc. Peter Touchman trades during the closing bell at New York Stock Exchange on December 31, 2014 in New York City. (Brad Barket/Getty Images)

On the first day of trading in 2015, we look at what’s expected in the stock market this year — after a strong year in 2014.

Mike Regan of Bloomberg News joins Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd to share his outlook.

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NPR Story
4:09 pm
Thu January 1, 2015

TV In 2015: The Brits Are Back

American television loves nothing better than a spot of tea, singing medieval knights, frightfully polite heirs and heiresses, and those delightful accents.

NPR’s TV critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins about a few of the British-themed shows we’ll be seeing on television in 2015.

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NPR Story
4:09 pm
Thu January 1, 2015

2015 Brings Freezing Temperatures Around The U.S.

This photo from Jan. 17, 2007 shows icicles created by drip irrigation hanging from an orange tree in Orange Cove, California. California citrus growers are facing another cold snap this year, but it is not expected to be anywhere as dramatic as the one in 2007, which resulted in the governor declaring a state of emergency. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Today is the beginning of a new year, and it is cold. Around the country temperatures are dropping below freezing putting citrus crops at risk in California and freezing fire hoses in Wyoming.

Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Joel Nelsen, president of California Citrus Mutual about how growers are dealing with the low temperatures.

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NPR Story
4:09 pm
Thu January 1, 2015

What Factors Influence The Gender Pay Gap?

Waitress Sheila Abramson at Langer's Delicatessen serves customers on February 26, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. In his report for the Atlantic, Derek Thompson showed that the gender wage gap is almost nonexistent for food service jobs (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images).

The pay gap between men and women is at the lowest level for the Millennial generation, according to a new study by the salary information service PayScale and “personal branding agency” Millennial Branding.

Derek Thompson, senior editor at the Atlantic, tells Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins that some jobs have almost no pay gap, a phenomenon economists explain using the “sticky floor theory” of the wage gap.

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NPR Story
4:16 pm
Wed December 31, 2014

A Resurgence In Space Exploration

NASA's Orion resembles an Apollo capsule, signaling a return to this cheap and effective design (NASA).

It was a big year on Earth, but enough of that — let’s talk about space!

NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel talks to Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins about new spacecrafts, new missions, and space triumphs and failures of 2014.

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NPR Story
4:16 pm
Wed December 31, 2014

Minimum Wage To Increase In 20 States On New Year's Day

Protesters march through the streets of New York on December 4 demanding a raise on the minimum wage to $15 per hour. The movement, driven largely by fast food workers, has risen in prominence in the past year. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Twenty states across the nation will ring in the New Year with higher minimum wages — increasing pay for around 3 million workers, according to the liberal Economic Policy Institute.

The highest minimum wage in the country will be in Washington state, where the minimum wage will rise to $9.47. The federal minimum wage is $7.25.

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NPR Story
4:16 pm
Wed December 31, 2014

'Life Itself': The Documentary About Film Critic Roger Ebert

Chaz Ebert and filmmaker Steve James attend the premiere of Magnolia Pictures' "Life Itself" at ArcLight Hollywood on June 26 in Hollywood, California. (Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

Roger Ebert once said that movies were an “empathy machine” — they allowed us to have more insight in to lives of other people who are sharing this human journey with us.

That may explain why he won a Pulitzer Prize and went on to become perhaps the most famous film critic in America, the “thumbs-up” partner to Gene Siskel on their TV program about the movies.

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