Here & Now

M-Th 1-3p & F 1-2p
Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young

Here & Now is an exciting daily news magazine hosted by veteran journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson. The program is designed to reflect the fluid world of news as it's happening, with timely, smart and in-depth reporting and conversation. It's produced by NPR News, WBUR Boston and a consortium of 12 public radio stations that includes WUNC.

Hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young are thrilled to be a part of the WUNC lineup
Credit WBUR

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NPR Story
5:16 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Concerns Over Brazil’s Readiness For World Cup And Summer Olympics

The Arena Pantanal stadium is under construction ahead of the 2014 World Cup soccer tournament in Cuiaba, Brazil, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013. FIFA wants all World Cup stadiums completed by December. (Felipe Dana/AP)

With the 2014 Winter Olympic Games kicking off this week in Sochi, it may seem excessive to look ahead to the 2016 Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro. However, Brazilian officials are already under significant pressure for not meeting deadlines in planning the 2016 Olympic Games and the 2014 World Cup.

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NPR Story
5:16 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

To Close Or Not to Close Highways In A Winter Storm

Cars travel down a highway during a snowstorm in the Brooklyn borough on February 3, 2014 in New York City. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Forecasters are calling it Nika – the latest major winter storm, now dumping snow on Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New England. In New York, ice spurred Governor Cuomo to take the major step of closing I-84, the highway that runs from Pennsylvania to Massachusetts.

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NPR Story
5:16 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Stock Market Volatility Jumps In 2014

The Chicago Board of Options Exchange’s Volatility Index (VIX) has been tracking the speed of stock price movements since 1990. In January, the index showed that volatility – or the fluctuation of share prices – jumped 34 percent.

This is the largest increase in VIX history and possibly indicates that investors are getting surprised and changing their investment decisions. NPR’s Marilyn Geewax joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss “volatility” and what this increase says about the market in 2014.

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NPR Story
5:01 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

Behind The Ups And Downs On Wall Street

U.S. stocks opened slightly higher today after the Dow Jones plunged more than 320 points yesterday — the worst day in more than seven months. The S&P 500 also inched up at the open, after ending yesterday down nearly 6 percent from a recent high.

So what’s up with the ups and downs? Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the drop and whether it will continue.

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NPR Story
5:01 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

What Airline Hub Closures Mean For Communities

A United Airlines sits on the tarmac at San Francisco International Airport on January 23, 2014 in San Francisco, California. United Airlines parent company United Continental Holdings reported a surge in fourth quarter profits with earnings of $140 million compared to a loss of $620 million one year ago. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

This weekend, United Airlines announced it was cutting roughly 60 percent of its departures from Cleveland, beginning this spring. The move effectively eliminates United’s hub at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

Yesterday, city officials gave their official response to the news, doing their best to put a positive spin on it. We hear a report from Brian Bull of WCPN, a Here & Now contributor station.

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NPR Story
5:01 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

'Jeopardy Villain' Explains How He Keeps Winning

Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek and contestant Arthur Chu pose for a photo. (Facebook)

He’s being called the “Jeopardy villain,” but Arthur Chu of Broadview Heights, Ohio, considers himself more of a “mad genius.” The 30-year-old insurance analyst and voiceover artist has won three times since he came on the show last week.

Some say Chu is taking all the fun out of the game. He goes for the hardest questions first, slams down his buzzer incessantly and tries to get the host to speed up. It’s all part of his strategy inspired by game theory — a model of strategic, mathematical decision making.

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NPR Story
6:03 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Dining Out At The Dawn Of The 1900s

Hotel Astor, December 7, 1904, Byron Company. (From the book "Repast: Dining Out at the Dawn of the New American Century, 1900-1910" by Michael Lesy and Lisa Stoffer)

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 3:26 pm

When did Americans, raised on the food of the Puritans — some meat or fish, some potatoes, some corn — start eating the food of immigrants who came after them?

Author and Hampshire College literary journalism professor Michael Lesy takes up that question in one chapter of his latest book, written with his wife Lisa Stoffer, “Repast: Dining Out at the Dawn of the New American Century, 1900-1910.”

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NPR Story
6:03 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

With Hoffman's Death, A Look At Heroin Use

New York City Police Department investigators leave the apartment building of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman after he was reported dead on February 2, 2014 in the Greenwich Village area of New York. (Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue February 4, 2014 11:35 am

The New York City medical examiner’s office is doing an autopsy today on the body of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman. The actor and father of three was found on Sunday in his Manhattan apartment, dead of an apparent heroin overdose.

Philadelphia social worker and former heroin addict Jeff Deeney writes about Hoffman’s death in a piece in The Atlantic:

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NPR Story
6:03 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

U.S. Banks In Buyer's War For Loan Officers

Refinancing has plummeted, so with peak home purchasing season on the horizon, banks are trying to beef up their new home loan business.

Some banks that have laid off workers in their re-fi call centers are now engaged in bidding wars for experienced home loan officers.

Cardiff Garcia of the Financial Times joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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NPR Story
4:11 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

Researchers Create Pizza That Lasts 3 Years

Military researchers in Natick are using cutting-edge pizza technology to create state-of-the-art slices that can last up to three years at 80 degrees. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Pizza is an American favorite, with 93 percent of Americans eating pizza at least once a month. In Natick, Mass., researchers are using cutting-edge technology to creating state-of-the-art slices for the U.S. military.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Bruce Gellerman of WBUR delivers our report.

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