All Things Considered

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A few years ago, mysterious green bottles started washing up on the New England coast.

Each one contained a message from Ken Baker, a crane operator who lives in the Scituate, Mass. So far, Baker has thrown 223 of these bottles into the Atlantic Ocean.

The journey of Baker's bottles starts in his basement. They originally started in 2012 when his wife bought some bottles of San Pellegrino water.

"I used to clean 'em and wash 'em, and put 'em on my fence posts outside. I think my neighbors thought I was a raging alcoholic for a while," he says.

In Flint, Mich., government officials allowed water from the Flint River to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water. The damaged pipes continue to contaminate the water, and it could take months — or years — to repair and rebuild the water system.

It could take even longer to rebuild something more abstract: trust, between citizens and their government.

Roxanne Adair, a vendor at the local farmers market, says this goes deeper than just the water.

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A reality check today from Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen. She acknowledged that the U.S. economy is facing a higher level of risk than just a few months ago. NPR's John Ydstie reports.

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In New Hampshire, the polls have now closed in much of the state, and we are awaiting the results. Officials have been predicting record voter turnout in the state's primary. And here are the voices of just a few of those voters.

Japan is venturing further into the terra incognito of negative interest rates, selling a 10-year government bond that actually costs its purchasers money over time.

In doing so, it joins a handful of European countries that have also lowered rates below zero.

The yield on the 10-year note sold by the Bank of Japan dipped to an unprecedented level of negative .05 percent, meaning that anyone who buys it will lose money.

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