The State of Things
6:22 am
Thu November 28, 2013

Thanksgiving Specials - November 2013

Two specials will air Thanksgiving Thursday and Friday during the "The State of Things" time slots. "The State of Things" returns Monday.

President Barack Obama views student projects created on laptops during a tour of Mooresville Middle School in Mooresville, N.C., June 6, 2013.
President Barack Obama views student projects created on laptops during a tour of Mooresville Middle School in Mooresville, N.C., June 6, 2013.
Credit Pete Souza / Official White House Photo

One Child At A Time: Custom Learning in a Digital Age - Thursday at 12 Noon and 8 p.m.

Researchers have long known the best way to learn is with a personal tutor. But tutoring is expensive. Providing the benefits of tutoring to everyone hasn't been possible. Now, experts say technology creates new ways for schools to customize education for each student. This program documents the rise of so-called "personalized learning." It takes listeners to schools that are reinventing their approach to education, and explores how teaching and learning change when personalization replaces one-size-fits-all in the classroom.

Visit this program's web site

 Second Chance Diploma - Friday 12 Noon

Chad Phelps, 26, has been composing music since he dropped out of high school in ninth grade. Now that he has his GED, he wants to go to college and become an audio engineer. May 2013.
Chad Phelps, 26, has been composing music since he dropped out of high school in ninth grade. Now that he has his GED, he wants to go to college and become an audio engineer. May 2013.
Credit Laurie Stern / American Radio Works

The General Educational Development test (GED) is a second chance for millions of people who didn't finish high school. Each year, more than 700,000 people take the GED test. People who pass it are supposed to possess a level of education and skills equivalent to those of a high school graduate. Most test-takers hope the GED will lead to a better job or more education.

But critics say the GED encourages some students to drop out of school. And research shows the credential is of little value to most people who get one.

Visit this program's web site

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