PHOTOS: Artists, Futurists Descend On Durham For Moogfest

May 20, 2017

Music producers, artists, and the future-curious explored art installations, talks, and concerts during Moogfest in downtown Durham. The festival celebrates artists who use technology to produce innovative sounds and visual art.

The second edition in the North Carolina city attracted headliners like Kendrick Lamar collaborator Flying Lotus, rapper Talib Kweli, and Prince-endorsed R&B trio KING. A local cast of creative-thinkers and musicians like Laila Nur, Jess Dilday (DJ PlayPlay) and Lonnie Holley also shared their talents with festival-goers.

 

The four-day festival is an homage to Robert “Bob” Moog the inventor of the popular Moog synthesizer and pioneer in electronic music production.

 

In these snapshots captured on the first and second days of the festival, participants explore foreign worlds through virtual reality, take in a spectrum of light and projections during live performances, and go digging for rare vinyl treasures.

 

River Takada-Capel greets customers at a pop-up shop organized by The Mothership in Durham.
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC

Musician Ty Richards goes crate digging for Paul McCartney’s Ram album
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC
Tyler Swanson (pictured) and his twin brothers Brendan asked their parents to take the family to Moogfest as their birthday present this year. Mom Julie Swanson says the boys got their wish.
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC

Drummer Rebecca Ward of Durham rocks out on a sensory percussion set-up.
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC
Friends and business partners Nadiyah Barrow (left) and Christina Worthington (right) sell apparel adorned with sex-positive messages about consent and self-worth at The Mothership pop-up shop during Moogfest. They say the project started as a support group for sexual assault survivors at North Carolina Central University.
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC
David Lizmi, Jeremy Thal, Ricardo Nigaglioni, and Devin Breenwood (left to right) of Found Sound Nation welcome visitors to a quirky jam session in a dome installation in downtown Durham.
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC
Herbie Hancock’s Future Shock album spins in the Moogfest Modular Marketplace. Hancock employed the Mini-Moog and Memory Moog synthesizers when producing the record.
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC
Graham Barkley of Durham plays with a Moog theramin. Barkley says he’s always been drawn to the science fiction sounds of the instrument.
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC
Micahla Thomas has her first virtual reality experience in a scenario designed by art collective Flatsitter.
Credit Laura Pellicer / WUNC