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1:41 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Best Of Back Porch Music Vol 16

30 second samples of all the tunes on the Best of BPM Vol 16 - new for Fall 2013 and our thank-you for supporting WUNC Radio! Pledge Now. See more of our thank-you gifts.

1 Tift Merritt—Traveling Alone . . . . . . 4:45

Originally from Houston, but raised in Raleigh, NC, Tift Merritt attended UNC-Chapel Hill. She was based in North Carolina for much of her early career starting in the 1990s through the mid 2000s. She now resides in New York City and records for the North Carolina based Yep Roc label. Traveling Alone was released in 2012. Her first album was nominated for Grammy in 2004.

2 Putnam Smith — Succotash . . . . . . . . . 4:14

Putnam Smith’s web site bio proudly states “He lives in a log cabin just north of Portland, Maine, and loves compost.” And, he writes some nice folk tunes, too.

3 Anna Roberts-Gevalt & Elizabeth LaPrelle — Sun To Sun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:17

Virginia-based Anna & Elizabeth state that their mission is to bring “light to old ballads, tunes, hymns, and the stories of everyday people.” They do so with a series of fine traditional albums and their resurrection of a form of rural entertainment called “the crankie.” A crankie consists of long swaths of decorated fabric or paper rolled up on both ends like a scroll. The scroll is installed in a box, and a storyteller uses it by slowly cranking the scroll as they relate a narrative, often with music. See a crankie at our web site: bit.ly/1aF2I1P

4 John Stickley Trio — Palm Tree . . . . . . . . . . 4:48

John Stickley and his trio are based in Asheville, NC. There music exists somewhere in the intersection of bluegrass and jazz with perhaps a touch of folk-jam.

5 Tim O’Brien & Darrell Scott — Long Time Gone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:02

Both Tim and Darrell have written several songs that have been Country chart toppers for other artists, including The Dixie Chicks, Garth Brooks, and Brad Paisley. They periodically join forces to create some jaw-droppingly arresting performances. This comes from their live album “We're Usually A Lot Better Than This.” It’s from a benefit concert in 2005 for the Arthur Morgan School where both Tim and Darrell had a child attending.

6 Big Country Bluegrass — I’m Putting On My Leaving Shoes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:54

This sextet of bluegrass musicians all hail from the Western Carolina-Virginia border area and formed as a band in the mid 1980s. Their name comes from a bluegrass instrumental called “Big Country” recorded by legend Jimmy Martin. Their no-nonsense hard-core traditionalists recordings are often praised by bluegrass fans and critics.

7 Rayna Gellert—Nothing . . . . . . . . . . 4:04

Rayna is praised for her old-time fiddle tunes and recordings as well as for her more folk-inspired approaches (like this one). Between 2003 and 2008 she was a member of the acclaimed ensemble Uncle Earle. She grew up in Indiana and moved to NC to attend Warren Wilson College in the early 1990s. She lives in Swannanoa, North Carolina.

8 Ken & Brad Kolodner—Liza Jane/Sandy Boys/Hangman’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:12

Ken and Brad are an old-time/folk duo based in Baltimore, MD that specializes in Appalachian folk music, especially music for hammered dulcimer and fiddle or banjo. They appear often at festivals in North Carolina from the mountains to the sea.

9 The Kickin’ Grass Band — Walk With Me . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:02

Raleigh’s Kickin’ Grass Band make their second appearance on a Best of BPM CD. Their tunes are contemporary bluegrass but with nods to traditional roots and folk music as well and range from ballads to rousing toe-tappers.

10 The South Carolina Broadcasters — When I’m Gone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:38

These three broadcasters are based in Columbia, SC, and are self-described as “Southern children going forward at top volume.” Part old-time, part bluegrass, they play traditional festivals as well as Shakori Hills and at many venues across North and South Carolina.

11 The Honey Dewdrops— No More Trouble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:03

The Honey Dewdrops are the Virginia-based roots duet of Laura Wortman and Kagey Parrish with three CDs of self-pinned tunes under their belts. In addition to popping up from time to time on BPM, they’ve appeared with Garrison Keilor on “A Prairie Home Companion.”

12 Gravy Boys — Darlene . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:37

Their own web site sums it up the best: The Gravy Boys make Americana music “by adding a cup of country, a pinch of roots rock, a handful of honky-tonk, a splash of bluegrass, a dash of hobo folk, stirring vigorously, and letting it simmer 'til the pot bubbles over.” Bon appetit.

13 Mike Compton/Joe Newberry — Evening Prayer Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:57

Both Mike Compton and Joe Newberry are multi-award winners (from the IBMA and Grammys) and are two of the best acoustic musicians recording today. Mike, a well regarded mandolin player, is described a protégé of Bill Monroe and was associated with the highly successful “Oh Brother Where Art Thou?” soundtrack. In addition to his solo and duet work, Joe is a member of Big Medicine. He also won the bluegrass Song of the Year IBMA award in 2013 for “They Called It Music,” a tune he co-wrote with Eric Gibson of the Gibson Brothers. This is from their self-released live album.

14 Catfish Keith — Aberdeen, Mississippi Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:22
The blues are weekly a part of Back Porch Music. For more than 30 years Catfish (his name comes from his swimming “technique” as commented upon by a diving partner) has recorded acoustic-based blues, forming his own label in the early 1990s. Catfish was inducted into the Iowa Blues Hall of Fame in 2008.

15 Williamson Brothers — Song For Jimmy Campbell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:50

Chatham County brothers Tony and Gary Williamson perform an old-time style of music that dates back some nine generations. Tony is a celebrated builder of mandolins and runs Mandolin Central in Siler City, NC.