Will Michaels

Producer, "The State of Things"

Will Michaels is a fan of news, sound and story. He started as an intern at WUNC when he was a student at the University of North Carolina. As a part of his internship, he worked for a semester on the daily national show, The Story with Dick Gordon. Will concentrated on radio while at college, studying under veteran NPR reporter Adam Hochberg. He began as a reporter for Carolina Connection, UNC's radio news magazine, and then became an anchor and managing editor for the program in 2009, when it was named the best college radio news program in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Will came back to WUNC in 2010 as the producer for Morning Edition for a couple of years, rising before the sun to help morning host Eric Hodge gather and present the news. In 2014, he produced WUNC's My Teacher series, part of the North Carolina Teacher Project. He is now a producer for The State of Things.

Ways To Connect

During Sunshine Week the media celebrates open government and transparency in public records.
Holley St. Germain / Flickr Creative Commons

Media outlets mark Sunshine Week as a time to celebrate and promote open government laws and free access to public records.

Soldier saluting
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Today's segment is a rebroadcast of Understanding And Treating PTSD In The Military.

    

Nearly one in five veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will be diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

That’s a sobering statistic for the researchers and psychologists who are trying to understand and treat PTSD. It also means more veterans than ever are suffering from PTSD’s debilitating symptoms.

Fire Pink Trio recently released their first album, "Poetry in Motion."
Melanie Hatton / Firepinktrio.com

The classical music group Fire Pink Trio gets its name from the vibrant mountain wildflower that grows throughout North America.

They bring the same energy and creative force to their work, from the classics of Brahms to the contemporary pieces of North Carolina composer Dan Locklair. And their experience as educators allows them to pass on the sound to the next generation of classical musicians. The trio released a debut album last month: Poetry in Motion: Music for Flute, Viola, and Harp. 

A picture of a coal ash pond.
Waterkeeper Alliance

    

This week, Duke Energy has paid $171 million to shareholders and the state of North Carolina.

The first bill was for $146 million to settle a lawsuit that claimed the company misled shareholders when it agreed to a merger with Progress Energy in 2012. The other $25 million was a fine from the state for spilling coal ash at a power plant in Wilmington.

Meanwhile, the conversation continues about how to dispose of the coal ash sitting at 14 sites across the state.

Guest host Phoebe Judge gets an update from WUNC environment reporter Dave DeWitt.

Gov. Pat McCrory
Governor's Office

    

Gov. Pat McCrory filed new forms with the State Ethics Commission that show previously undisclosed travel expenses. 

The governor now says outside groups paid for seven of his trips in 2013, totaling more than $13,000. The money comes from appearances at national governors' conferences, including four backed by the Republican Party. 

The governor says it is appropriate for those groups to pay for his travel. Critics say failure to show the expenses on the original form follows a pattern of nondisclosure at the governor's office.

"The Last Barn Dance" tells the story of North Carolina dairy farmer Randy Lewis.
Ted Richardson and Jason Arthurs

    

Randy Lewis' dairy farm has been a gathering place for the people of Eli Whitney, N.C., for more than 50 years.

His family's annual barn dances are living relics of simpler times in North Carolina's agricultural industry.

But the Great Recession forced farmers to find new ways to save those traditions. Many went out of business. Lewis and a handful of others stopped falling further into debt by bottling their own milk. But it remains to be seen whether cultural traditions like the barn dance will stay alive.

Penn State Special Collections

    

Rev. Clark Olsen still remembers every detail of the incident that killed a fellow white minister in Selma, Alabama 50 years ago.

Rev. Olsen was one of many clergy members that arrived in Selma on this day in 1965 to show solidarity with black voting rights protestors, and he was at the side of Rev. James Reeb when four segregationists attacked them on the night of March 9, 1965.

Rev. Reeb died two days later. Rev. Olsen now lives in Asheville and still works to keep the memory of Selma and Rev. Reeb alive.

Mayorga-Gallo's book explores the benefits of living in a racially diverse Durham neighborhood.
UNC Press

Researchers concluded long ago that segregated schools and neighborhoods were linked to racial inequality. “Separate, but equal” is a fallacy.

But Sarah Mayorga-Gallo wanted to find out if the converse is true. Is there a link between diverse neighborhoods and more racial equality?

She tried to answer that question by studying a racially diverse community in Durham. 

Her research is compiled in a book called Behind the White Picket Fence: Power and Privilege in a Multiethnic Neighborhood (UNC Press/2014).

Photo from the first U.S. nuclear field exercise on land on Nov. 1, 1951.
Federal Government of the United States / Wikimedia Commons

    

It has been nearly 50 years since the U.S. and the Soviet Union first sat down to talk about limiting their arsenals of nuclear weapons. 

Today, Russia and the U.S. have reduced their stockpiles, but they still have nearly 2,000 warheads each and several other countries have shown interest in creating or expanding their nuclear arsenal. 

So how do we gauge the threat of a nuclear conflict? What would nuclear war look like if it were limited to one region of the world?

John F. Blair Publisher

  

Known in North Carolina as the "Barbecue Man," Bob Garner shares his love of the state's favorite food through recipe books, restaurant reviews, and regular segments on UNC-TV's North Carolina Weekend, where some foods get his stamp of approval: "Mmm-mmm."

But his newest book takes readers on a culinary trip around the state from the little-known Neuse River Fish Stew and Ocracoke Fig Cake to the classic Krispy Kreme Doughnuts, Texas Pete hot sauce and Mount Olive pickles.

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