Will Michaels

Producer, "The State of Things"

Will Michaels is a fan of news, sound and story. He started as an intern at WUNC when he was a student at the University of North Carolina. As a part of his internship, he worked for a semester on the daily national show, The Story with Dick Gordon. Will concentrated on radio while at college, studying under veteran NPR reporter Adam Hochberg. He began as a reporter for Carolina Connection, UNC's radio news magazine, and then became an anchor and managing editor for the program in 2009, when it was named the best college radio news program in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Will came back to WUNC in 2010 as the producer for Morning Edition for a couple of years, rising before the sun to help morning host Eric Hodge gather and present the news. In 2014, he produced WUNC's My Teacher series, part of the North Carolina Teacher Project. He is now a producer for The State of Things.

Ways To Connect

Greensboro poet David Roderick's newest collection, The Americans (University of Pittsburgh Press/2014), examines the social aspects that define the country.

A child of the classic American suburb, Roderick found the definition lies somewhere in the middle of our history, our perceptions and the American dream.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Roderick about The Americans.

The Rinaldi Flying Circus

Stacey, Joe, Mike and Rob Rinaldi say their brand of rock and roll ranges from dirty blues to driving rock and tear-jerking ballads.

Along with drummer Aaron Cummings, the Greensboro family band plays a vintage rock sound with an eclecticism that lives up to their name.

Host Frank Stasio talks with The Rinaldi Flying Circus.

bendertj / Flickr Creative Commons

The Chapel Hill Transit system needs about $80 million in revenue to keep up with growth over the next ten years. 

That's according to a report presented to the town council this week.  It says the bus network will need to reduce service, start leasing buses, or consider more revenue from three different sources:

  1. Taxes from Chapel Hill and Carrboro
  2. Fees from students at UNC-Chapel Hill
  3. Charging passengers. 

The service is currently free for riders. 

A picture of segments of pipeline.
Harald Hoyer / Creative Commons

    

Two North Carolina energy companies are helping to build a natural gas pipeline that would bring the energy boom to our state.

But those plans are meeting resistance from some landowners who don’t want a new pipeline running underneath their property. Many are trying to block it from the outset by barring surveyors from inspecting their land.

Dan Ariely / Duke Photography

Dan Ariely works in contradictions. He studies behavioral economics and points out that humans are logical but irrational beings.

How do we assign monetary value to a thought or an idea? How do we decide when a lie is more valuable than the truth? Are we really in control of the decisions we make on a daily basis?

At the crossroads of psychology and economics, Ariely has made it his life’s work to study the idea that some of our best intentions can lead to our most irrational behavior.

Jeanmarie Schubach

  

This week, staff members from The State of Things are sharing their favorite shows of 2014.

Producer Will Michaels joined the show in May after working as a producer for Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and the North Carolina Teacher Project at WUNC.

Some of Will’s favorites included an interview with a championship track coach who grew up in the segregated South and a conversation with some of the pioneers of NASCAR.

Host Frank Stasio talks with producer Will Michaels about the conversations that stood out in 2014.

Charlotte, N.C., the state's largest city
James Willamor / Flickr Creative Commons

North Carolina has moved up in the rankings of the largest states in the U.S.

The U.S. Census Bureau released its newest population estimates Tuesday.  They say North Carolina has overtaken Michigan to become the ninth-largest state.  As of July, North Carolina's population was just shy of 10 million. 

State demographer Jennifer Song says the nature of the growth shows North Carolina remains an attractive state for retirees and new professionals.

7-time Mayor of Charlotte and Republican nominee for Governor of North Carolina. At Cary Innovation Center, July 11, 2012.
Hal Goodtree / Creative Commons/Flickr

    

An investigation by the Associated Press says Gov. Pat McCrory failed to disclose some his dealings with Tree.com, a licensed mortgage broker in North Carolina.

The governor was a board member of the Charlotte-based company when he took office, and the report says McCrory did not properly fill out financial statements that would have suggested a conflict of interest.

Bladenboro, N.C.
Gary Dincher / Flickr Creative Commons

    

In August, 17-year-old Lennon Lacy was found dead in the small town of Bladenboro, N.C, hanging by his neck from a swing set.

Local police say Lacy killed himself, but Lacy's family says suspicious circumstances have raised questions about whether Lacy's death was a suicide or a lynching.

Lulu Publishing

    

Raleigh native Smedes York has witnessed and facilitated decades of growth in his hometown.

His father developed the iconic Cameron Village in the late 1940s, and he tackled the redevelopment of downtown during his time as mayor from 1979 to 1983.

His memoir, Growing up with Raleigh (Lulu Publishing/2014), documents a life of business, politics and urban planning in North Carolina's capital city.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Smedes York and historian John Sharpe about Growing Up With Raleigh.

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