Will Michaels

Producer, "The State of Things"

Will Michaels is a fan of news, sound and story. He started as an intern at WUNC when he was a student at the University of North Carolina. As a part of his internship, he worked for a semester on the daily national show, The Story with Dick Gordon. Will concentrated on radio while at college, studying under veteran NPR reporter Adam Hochberg. He began as a reporter for Carolina Connection, UNC's radio news magazine, and then became an anchor and managing editor for the program in 2009, when it was named the best college radio news program in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Will came back to WUNC in 2010 as the producer for Morning Edition for a couple of years, rising before the sun to help morning host Eric Hodge gather and present the news. In 2014, he produced WUNC's My Teacher series, part of the North Carolina Teacher Project. He is now a producer for The State of Things.

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Military
5:00 pm
Mon March 21, 2011

NC Marines Help In Air Strikes Against Gadhafi's Regime

Harrier at night aboard USS Kearsarge
Credit 26th MEU

Marines from Camp Lejeune are part of the coalition conducting air-strikes on Moammar Gadhafi's forces in Libya. The 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit joined attacks yesterday. Officials said they were successful in destroying military targets near Bengazi. Marines in the 26th began their deployment by aiding refugees of massive floods in Pakistan last August.

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Business & Economy
6:00 am
Mon March 21, 2011

Food Processing Center Opens Near Wilmington

A food distribution program at UNC-Wilmington is opening a food processing center this week for local farmers. The center will act as a way to deliver locally grown fruits and vegetables to area schools and restaurants. Farmers can store their goods at the center and make a profit from distribution.

Leslie Hossfeld is a co-founder of the program that sponsors the food center, called Feast Down East. She says the facility has partnered with more than 70 restaurants in Wilmington:

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Business & Economy
5:00 pm
Thu March 17, 2011

Garner Citizen Halts Circulation

A local newspaper called The Garner Citizen is no longer circulating. Owners say their revenue wasn't keeping up with production costs. Officials with the Audit Bureau of Circulations say newspaper circulation nationwide dropped nearly 9 percent last year. The last print edition of the Garner Citizen was delivered yesterday morning. Founder and executive editor Barry Moore says the paper was losing subscribers as fast as it gained them:

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Education
5:00 pm
Tue March 15, 2011

NC State Drafts Long-Term Savings Plan

North Carolina State University is reorganizing many of its departments and services to prepare for more budget cuts. The plan includes eliminating at least five high-ranking positions and merging different student services under one roof. State officials have told public schools to prepare for budget cuts of as much as 15 percent. N.C. State has seen budget cuts every year since 2007.

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Politics & Government
5:00 pm
Mon March 14, 2011

Duke Energy Provides Credit To DNC

Duke Energy Corporation is providing a $10 million line of credit for next year's Democratic National Convention in Charlotte. The credit was required by the Democratic National Committee as part of the agreement to bring the convention to the Queen City. The contract also says the convention's host committee must raise more than $36 million to cover production expenses. 

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Environment
6:00 am
Mon March 14, 2011

Fix A Leak Week

The EPA's Fix a Leak Week
Credit epa.gov

Local utilities officials in the Triangle are encouraging residents to check for plumbing leaks in their homes this week. Durham and Cary have partnered with the Environmental Protection Agency in the "Fix a Leak Week" campaign. It works to inform utilities customers about how to check for leaks and step up efforts to conserve water. Cary's director of public works and utilities Steve Brown says toilet leaks are the most common:

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Law
5:00 am
Fri March 11, 2011

Smaller Meth Labs On The Rise

Methamphetamine labs are on the rise in North Carolina. That's according to state officials who say drug makers are finding new ways to produce it. The number of meth labs had dropped dramatically in 2007, when state lawmakers passed a bill limiting sales of decongestant medicines containing pseudoephedrine. That's a key ingredient in methamphetamine.

Attorney General Roy Cooper says meth producers are now making the drug in smaller batches to get around the law and avoid detection:

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Environment
2:10 pm
Wed March 9, 2011

Pelican Blown Off Course Calls NC Home

A brown pelican that ended up in Canada after after being blown off course by Hurricane Earl has arrived in North Carolina. A wildlife organization in Nova Scotia nursed the injured seabird after it was found there last September. The species' natural habitat generally extends from the coast of northern Virginia to Peru. The pelican, nicknamed Ralph, arrived at the Outer Banks Wildlife Shelter in Newport this morning after he was deemed healthy enough to travel. 

Clinic supervisor Maria Rush says the first step in Ralph's rehabilitation is reintroducing him to his own kind.

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Business & Economy
4:45 am
Wed March 9, 2011

Chatham County Scales Back Green Building Requirements

The Chatham County Board of Commissioners has votedto ease energy efficiency regulations for new and renovated county buildings. The decision repeals a policy that required any county construction projects of 20,000 square feet or more to include certification from Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. Commissioners say the new policy will save money by allowing for more ways to design the county's new judicial facility.  Chatham County manager Charlie Horne believes the county can maintain a high standard of energy efficient buildings without having LEED certification.

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Business & Economy
4:00 pm
Fri March 4, 2011

Toll Rate for Triangle Expressway Set

n
Credit ncturnpike.org

State transportation officials say drivers will pay 15 to 24 cents per mile to drive on the Triangle Expressway when it's complete. The North Carolina Turnpike Authority announced this week drivers will be charged electronically to use the road. The state will start selling transponders this fall that connect to a prepaid account. Sensors on the road will deduct 15 cents per mile along the way. Drivers don't have to buy a transponder, but cameras will photograph their license plates and send a bill through the mail for 24 cents per mile. 

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