Will Michaels

Producer, "The State of Things"

Will Michaels is a fan of news, sound and story. He started as an intern at WUNC when he was a student at the University of North Carolina. As a part of his internship, he worked for a semester on the daily national show, The Story with Dick Gordon. Will concentrated on radio while at college, studying under veteran NPR reporter Adam Hochberg. He began as a reporter for Carolina Connection, UNC's radio news magazine, and then became an anchor and managing editor for the program in 2009, when it was named the best college radio news program in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Will came back to WUNC in 2010 as the producer for Morning Edition for a couple of years, rising before the sun to help morning host Eric Hodge gather and present the news. In 2014, he produced WUNC's My Teacher series, part of the North Carolina Teacher Project. He is now a producer for The State of Things.

Ways To Connect

Gavel
www.stockmonkeys.com / Flickr Creative Commons

Joe and Lisa Stone are small-town attorneys in Virginia. The fine residents of Henry County know Stone and Stone as the firm that looks out for the little guy. 

But when an investigation into the apparent death of a paranoid, crackpot inventor reveals an invention that could be worth millions and a big pharmaceutical company that will stop at nothing to own it, things get a little murky for Stone and Stone. 

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie.
kenrudinpolitics.com

The legal challenge against North Carolina's voter ID law goes to trial next week. It's the culmination of two years' worth of arguments over the elections law passed in 2013.

Meanwhile, an early poll shows billionaire Donald Trump is the most popular Republican presidential candidate in North Carolina. 

Image of Bill T. Jones on the left. Jones is an award-winning choreographer and just completed Analogy/Dora: Tramontane.
Nazareth College / Flickr Creative Commons

Award-winning choreographer Bill T. Jones' newest creation, Analogy/Dora: Tramontaneis based on interviews he conducted with his 95-year-old mother-in-law, Dora Amelan, a Jewish nurse who survived the Holocaust.

Image of Sandra Bullock accepting a Golden Raspberry award in 2010 for worst actress.
Shari B. Ellis / Flickr Creative Commons

A "bad" movie can ruin a night out, or it can secretly be your favorite source of entertainment for a night in.

We all have movies that we would rather not admit we enjoy, but sometimes we cannot stop ourselves from loving corny one-liners or ridiculous action scenes.

They are on the shelf marked "Guilty Pleasures." 

Image of US Women's National Soccer Team huddling up.
kkimphotography / Flickr Creative Commons

The United States women's national soccer team won its third World Cup title this past weekend. The American women have been dominant since FIFA created the tournament in 1991.

Today's success is thanks in large part to the women who built the program in the 1990s. The hype and drama of the title in 1999 is regarded as a milestone not just for women's soccer, but for professional sports in the United States. 

An image of the Supreme Court
Kjetil Ree / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court says housing discrimination does not have to be intentional to be illegal.

Last week's ruling in the case of Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project held that while the state did not intend to create racially discriminatory housing policies, the negative outcomes for minority communities in Dallas meant a violation of the Fair Housing Act.

The decision could affect the way states across the country assign affordable housing projects, including in North Carolina.

Chad Biggs (left), 35, and Chris Creech, 46, were the first gay couple to be wed in Wake County.
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

In a 5-4 ruling today, the U.S. Supreme Court said all 50 states must recognize marriages between same-sex couples. The decision also means those couples can now get married anywhere and have their marriages recognized in all states.

Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the decision for the majority. Each dissenting justice also wrote his own opinion.

Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC capitol bureau chief Jeff Tiberii about this morning's ruling.

An image of the Supreme Court
Kjetil Ree / Wikimedia Commons

The United States Supreme Court issued a decision today upholding tax subsidies under the Affordable Care Act. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the court's opinion.

Three justices, the court's most conservative members, dissented. The decision allows 460,000 North Carolinians to continue to receive subsidies for their health insurance.

Image of wedding rings
Robert Cheaib / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court will soon rule on whether states can ban same-sex marriage. The right to marry could be extended to more same-sex couples, but will they actually decide to get married?

Research shows about half of the American population thinks they are just as well off if marriage is not a top priority. And the gaps in marriage rates are widening with respect to race and education.

Voting sign
Wikipedia

A lawsuit that challenges North Carolina's voting law is on hold after state lawmakers passed more changes to photo ID requirements. 

The delay in the case comes just days after the General Assembly approved a bill that eases some of the restrictions on which identifications are acceptable at the polls.

   

Both sides in the lawsuit asked for more time to figure out how the new rules might affect their cases, but they are racing against the countdown to North Carolina's 2016 primary elections coming up in March.

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