Will Michaels

Producer, "The State of Things"

Will Michaels is a fan of news, sound and story. He started as an intern at WUNC when he was a student at the University of North Carolina. As a part of his internship, he worked for a semester on the daily national show, The Story with Dick Gordon. Will concentrated on radio while at college, studying under veteran NPR reporter Adam Hochberg. He began as a reporter for Carolina Connection, UNC's radio news magazine, and then became an anchor and managing editor for the program in 2009, when it was named the best college radio news program in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Will came back to WUNC in 2010 as the producer for Morning Edition for a couple of years, rising before the sun to help morning host Eric Hodge gather and present the news. In 2014, he produced WUNC's My Teacher series, part of the North Carolina Teacher Project. He is now a producer for The State of Things.

Ways To Connect

Image of Kathleen DuVal. Kathleen DuVal is a professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill and author of 'Independence Lost.'
Mary Lide Parker

Stories of the American Revolution often engender images of Paul Revere on horseback, George Washington crossing the Delaware or Red Coats firing during the Boston Massacre.

But down along the Gulf Coast, there were others involved in the revolution, many of whom changed American history.

Image of Marshall Brain, creator of howstuffworks.com and a professor at N.C. State
N.C. State University

North Carolina State University professor Marshall Brain grew up in southern California with a father who was a computer scientist at NASA during the agency's heyday.

Brain watched his father work on lunar excursion modules for the Apollo missions and later, major train systems in San Francisco and Atlanta.

In his spare time, he helped Marshall build a bubble machine out of spare parts. It was an enchanting childhood, and it is no wonder that Marshall was a curious boy who developed a love for all things mechanical. 

Image of video poker
Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr Creative Commons

Nearly three years after North Carolina outlawed Internet sweepstakes games, a new report shows how hard owners fought to keep them going.


They spent $10 million on lawyers and lobbyists over four years.

The investigation has led to the resignation of one member of the state Board of Elections.

Some of the money also went to political campaigns in North Carolina, but the report says there were no violations of campaign finance law. 

Image of fiber optics
Kainet / Flickr Creative Commons

In a bizarre turn of events, the North Carolina based company RST Fiber will no longer be providing ultra-high-speed Internet to the town of Wake Forest.

Ironically, the reason seems to be a lack of communication. The company has stopped responding to customers, partners or reporters, and it has been plagued with multiple lengthy service outages since January.


Raleigh Little Theatre

In the last decade, there has been a surge of new work from African-American artists in the Triangle.

But they are still grappling with a limited number of platforms, especially in the performing arts. The amount of talent is booming, but the number of roles for African-Americans is not keeping up.

Now, a group of black artists in the Triangle is trying to bridge that gap through a forum that brings artists together with local entrepreneurs and art lovers who are craving new modes of expression.

Voting sign
kristinausk / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal trial is underway in a case challenging North Carolina's elections law. Opponents say provisions limiting early voting amount to voter suppression that especially affects African-Americans. 

Supporters say the measure prevents fraud. The decision from Judge Thomas D. Schroeder could have big implications for voting laws across the country.

Host Frank Stasio talks with WFAE reporter Michael Tomsic about the latest.

NC General Assembly
Jorge Valencia

Members of the General Assembly are back in Raleigh after a week-long vacation. They still must pass a budget for the next two years and consider several other bills, including Medicaid reform and Gov. Pat McCrory's bond proposal.

And Greensboro challenges the legislature’s measure changing voting districts for the city council. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with WUNC capitol reporter Jorge Valencia about the legislature's agenda for the rest of the summer.

www.stockmonkeys.com / Flickr Creative Commons

Joe and Lisa Stone are small-town attorneys in Virginia. The fine residents of Henry County know Stone and Stone as the firm that looks out for the little guy. 

But when an investigation into the apparent death of a paranoid, crackpot inventor reveals an invention that could be worth millions and a big pharmaceutical company that will stop at nothing to own it, things get a little murky for Stone and Stone. 

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie.

The legal challenge against North Carolina's voter ID law goes to trial next week. It's the culmination of two years' worth of arguments over the elections law passed in 2013.

Meanwhile, an early poll shows billionaire Donald Trump is the most popular Republican presidential candidate in North Carolina. 

Image of Bill T. Jones on the left. Jones is an award-winning choreographer and just completed Analogy/Dora: Tramontane.
Nazareth College / Flickr Creative Commons

Award-winning choreographer Bill T. Jones' newest creation, Analogy/Dora: Tramontaneis based on interviews he conducted with his 95-year-old mother-in-law, Dora Amelan, a Jewish nurse who survived the Holocaust.