Susan Davis

Producer, The State of Things

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State of Things
11:41 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Remembering Doc Watson

www.sugarhillrecords.com

Doc Watson's virtuosic guitar playing changed bluegrass music forever. He brought the guitar out from behind the banjo and fiddle and set the bar for acoustic musicians. His career took off with the folk revival of the 1950s and remained vital until his death last month. Now the Deep Gap, North Carolina native will forever be an icon of mountain music.

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State of Things
8:00 am
Thu June 7, 2012

From Slow Money to Impact Investing

Slow money is a movement that grew out of the 2008 financial collapse. The first principle of that movement is to “bring money back down to earth.” It calls for investing in local farms and food products. On today's program we are going to consider the Slow Money movement in North Carolina and ask this question: what if we applied the principles of Slow Money to things beyond food and farms? What happens when we create a system that values businesses that create healthy local economies and environments? That system is slowly taking shape and it's called Impact Investing.

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State of Things
11:04 am
Wed June 6, 2012

The New Old Organizers

North Carolina voters recently approved an amendment to the state constitution defining marriage as between one man and one woman. The amendment outlaws same sex marriage and threatens the recognition of civil unions and domestic partnerships.

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State of Things
10:58 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Stand Up That Mountain

Jay Leutze was a non-practicing lawyer writing a novel, working for the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and minding his own business in his home in western North Carolina when he got a phone call from an impassioned and outraged 14 year old named Ashley.

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State of Things
11:20 am
Fri June 1, 2012

The Right-Hand Shore

www.npr.org

Writer Christopher Tilghman is known to some as the bard of the borderlands. His short stories and novels, including the much acclaimed “Mason's Retreat," are set on the eastern shore of Maryland. It's a place where water and land meet, where slavery existed north of the Mason-Dixon Line and most of life is a calculation rather than a dream or a conviction.

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State of Things
12:15 pm
Thu May 24, 2012

Who’s Responsible for Human Rights?

Last month, a conference in Greensboro brought together more than 70 attorneys, activists and average citizens to talk about human and civil rights violations at the hands of law enforcement. Among the issues discussed were racial profiling, police brutality, mass incarceration, torture and rendition. The event was a call to action and the message was that every member of society is responsible for speaking out about abuses of state power.

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State of Things
10:55 am
Tue May 22, 2012

Syria’s Revolution and Egypt’s Elections

The United Nations estimates that 9,000 people have died in Syria since the revolution began in March of 2011 and the conflict spilled into Lebanon this week. Consider that it took a month for Tunisia to depose its ruler and only 18 days for Egypt to get rid of Hosni Mubarak, yet Syria’s President, Bashar Assad, shows no signs of stepping down.

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State of Things
10:51 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Debating Dual Language Immersion Programs

Given the popularity of dual language immersion programs in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro School District, the school board is considering establishing a dual language elementary magnet school. But where? Chapel Hill-Carrboro has never had a magnet school, but rapid growth is occasioning a new elementary school in the district. Whenever a new school is built, the board examines its programs and its service and considers how to do a better job. But the magnet school proposal could involve moving hundreds of kids around and upsetting parents in the process.

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State of Things
11:36 am
Fri May 11, 2012

The Poems of Wing Lei

windpub.com

Alex Grant is Scottish, not Chinese. But he's long been fascinated by Chinese poetry from the 9th century. For his new book he created a 9th century Chinese poet and he tells his life story through a series of poems.

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State of Things
11:03 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Alexander Calder and Contemporary Art

www.nasher.duke.edu

Take a moment and consider how utterly amazing the mobile is. They hang over babies’ cribs, in classrooms, children’s museums, toy stores and candy shops. The whimsical moving sculptures that transform with the power of wind were invented by Alexander Calder in the 1930s.

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