Susan Davis

Producer, The State of Things

There are many ways technology aids in the prevention of crime, but Elon University Law Professor Michael Rich has pondered how far should those methods go. What if software, computers and other digital equipment could actually prevent behavior leading up to a criminal act? Rich joins host Frank Stasio to talk about the social and moral implications of using technology at the risk of impeding on free will.

Meet Jon Powell

Aug 20, 2012

Growing up in Garner, Jon Powell stayed out of trouble.  His first encounter with the criminal justice system was as an attorney representing kids. The same kids, over and over again. After a while, his faith in the juvenile justice system to rehabilitate offenders was so low he turned to his religious faith to find a new path.

"The Jew Store" (Algonquin Books/1998) is Stella Suberman's bestselling memoir about growing up in a small town in Tennessee where her parents ran the dry goods market. The Great Depression sent Suberman's family back to New York and eventually to Miami where she found a larger community of Jews including her future husband. Her subsequent two books, including her latest, "The GI Bill Boys" (University of Tenneesee Press/2012), chronicle the better part of the 20th century. The Chapel Hill-based author joins host Frank Stasio to talk about her life’s journey.

Cheese, Please

Aug 2, 2012

Everything's better with cheese on it. Just ask the thousands of people gathered in Raleigh this week for the 29th annual conference of the American Cheese Society. Activities include a keynote address by author Temple Grandin,

African-American kinship often starts with slavery, an institution built on human trafficking – the buying and selling of people as if they were commodities.  The tearing apart of family was part of the violence of slavery and the constant threat of separation from your family was another kind of violence all its own. Historian Heather Williams studies the effects and after effects of slavery.

Audio Pending...

Alexandra Fuller's first book, "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight" (Random House/2001) was an international bestseller. It chronicled her childhood in colonial Africa as her family moved from impoverished farm to impoverished farm, landing in Rhodesia in time for the country’s war of independence.

Intimate Wars

Jul 24, 2012

An experience early in Merle Hoffman’s career as a counselor solidified her life’s mission.  She was asked to speak to and comfort a woman who was struggling with the decision to have an abortion. Holding that woman’s hand on that difficult day started Hoffman on the path of advocating for the reproductive rights of women everywhere.

Jay Leutze was a non-practicing lawyer writing a novel, working for the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and minding his own business in his home in western North Carolina when he got a phone call from an impassioned and outraged 14 year old named Ashley. She and her aunt and uncle, Ollie and Curly, were sure that the new scar on a nearby mountain was a violation of the state's Ridge Act.

Businessman Kevin Trapani will tell you that his company, Redwoods Group, does well by doing good.  Redwoods Group recently won an award that validates his claim. B-Lab, an organization that certifies socially responsible companies known as B-corps, named it one of the “Best Companies for the World.”

Hal Kwalwasser's examination of successful American school districts continues today with a look at Watauga County in western North Carolina. Kwalwasser documented the dedication of Watauga's teachers and how they work with families to make sure that students thrive in school in his book, “Renewal: Remaking America's Schools for the 21st Century” (R & L Education/2012). He joins host Frank Stasio again for the second part of our conversation on education reform.

Hal Kwalwasser was an anti-trust lawyer before becoming counsel to the Los Angeles Unified School District. He applied his legal skills to America's educational policy to break down the problems and find the solutions recorded in his new book, “Renewal: Remaking America's Schools for the 21st Century” (R & L Education/2012).

What becomes of the artifacts a literary lion leaves behind? When writer Reynolds Price died last year, his brother and niece sorted his property which included real estate holdings, an art collection and extensive correspondences with Eudora Welty, William Styron, W. H. Auden and Toni Morrison among other luminaries. Bill and Memsy Price join host Frank Stasio to discuss Reynolds Price's estate and his posthumously published unfinished memoir, "Midstream" (Scribner/2012)

Liz Seymour was in her 50s when she found herself divorced, living in a group house with her foster son and dumpster diving for food. She had left her comfortable, middle class existence willingly in order to find what she calls her "right-sized life." She became an anarchist and activist. Today she is the executive director of the Interactive Resource Center, Greensboro's only day center for people managing homelessness. Liz Seymour joins host Frank Stasio to discuss her journey from orderliness into happy chaos.

Big Bang Boom!

Jun 22, 2012

Chuck Folds, Steve Willard and Eddie Walker had been playing in rock bands all over the Triad when they formed Big Bang Boom, a band that makes family music. The decision was organic; they were dads and wanted to make some music their kids and their wives could love.

Duke Integrative Medicine provides holistic health care based on the best practices of traditional Western medicine as well as fundamental aspects of health like nutrition, exercise, spiritual practice, personal and professional development and environmental safety.

Doc Watson's virtuosic guitar playing changed bluegrass music forever. He brought the guitar out from behind the banjo and fiddle and set the bar for acoustic musicians. His career took off with the folk revival of the 1950s and remained vital until his death last month. Now the Deep Gap, North Carolina native will forever be an icon of mountain music.

Slow money is a movement that grew out of the 2008 financial collapse. The first principle of that movement is to “bring money back down to earth.” It calls for investing in local farms and food products. On today's program we are going to consider the Slow Money movement in North Carolina and ask this question: what if we applied the principles of Slow Money to things beyond food and farms? What happens when we create a system that values businesses that create healthy local economies and environments? That system is slowly taking shape and it's called Impact Investing.

North Carolina voters recently approved an amendment to the state constitution defining marriage as between one man and one woman. The amendment outlaws same sex marriage and threatens the recognition of civil unions and domestic partnerships.

Jay Leutze was a non-practicing lawyer writing a novel, working for the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and minding his own business in his home in western North Carolina when he got a phone call from an impassioned and outraged 14 year old named Ashley.

Writer Christopher Tilghman is known to some as the bard of the borderlands. His short stories and novels, including the much acclaimed “Mason's Retreat," are set on the eastern shore of Maryland. It's a place where water and land meet, where slavery existed north of the Mason-Dixon Line and most of life is a calculation rather than a dream or a conviction.

Last month, a conference in Greensboro brought together more than 70 attorneys, activists and average citizens to talk about human and civil rights violations at the hands of law enforcement. Among the issues discussed were racial profiling, police brutality, mass incarceration, torture and rendition. The event was a call to action and the message was that every member of society is responsible for speaking out about abuses of state power.

The United Nations estimates that 9,000 people have died in Syria since the revolution began in March of 2011 and the conflict spilled into Lebanon this week. Consider that it took a month for Tunisia to depose its ruler and only 18 days for Egypt to get rid of Hosni Mubarak, yet Syria’s President, Bashar Assad, shows no signs of stepping down.

Given the popularity of dual language immersion programs in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro School District, the school board is considering establishing a dual language elementary magnet school. But where? Chapel Hill-Carrboro has never had a magnet school, but rapid growth is occasioning a new elementary school in the district. Whenever a new school is built, the board examines its programs and its service and considers how to do a better job. But the magnet school proposal could involve moving hundreds of kids around and upsetting parents in the process.

Alex Grant is Scottish, not Chinese. But he's long been fascinated by Chinese poetry from the 9th century. For his new book he created a 9th century Chinese poet and he tells his life story through a series of poems.

Take a moment and consider how utterly amazing the mobile is. They hang over babies’ cribs, in classrooms, children’s museums, toy stores and candy shops. The whimsical moving sculptures that transform with the power of wind were invented by Alexander Calder in the 1930s.

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