Susan Davis

Producer, The State of Things

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The State of Things
11:34 am
Wed February 16, 2011

Egypt After The Uprising

Credit Chris Hondros - http://www.bagnewsnotes.com

As we wonder what will happen in the wake of the 30-year Mubarak regime, host Frank Stasio talks with experts, expatriates and observers about the possibilities.

Last week's toppling of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak has drawn the attentions of the world to the unrest in the Middle East. As we wonder what will happen in the wake of the 30-year Mubarak regime, host Frank Stasio talks with experts, expatriates and observers about the possibilities.

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Arts & Culture
10:05 am
Wed February 9, 2011

The Literature Of Forgetting

Book Cover
Credit www.stefanmerrillblock.com

As Duke University convenes its 25th annual conference on Alzheimer's disease, host Frank Stasio considers the state of the science and the literature with his guests.

More than five million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. By mid-century, that number is expected to double, if not quadruple. Researchers are learning more about the progressive neurological disorder that affects memory and other functions of the brain, but there is still no treatment or cure. Writers have begun documenting the epidemic, creating fiction and nonfiction that renders the mysterious disease and how it uniquely changes the lives of patients and caregivers alike. The New York Times declared this writing a new genre, calling it "Alzheimer's Literature."

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The State of Things
9:51 am
Tue April 13, 2010

Voices of SNCC

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) was founded at Shaw University in April of 1960. Hoping to harness the enthusiasm and willpower of young people to end segregation, founders Ella Baker, James Lawson and Julian Bond organized protests and actions across the south. SNCC was vital to the impact of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

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The State of Things
11:57 am
Thu March 26, 2009

Jewish-American Identity & Food

A lot of what we cook defines us. Say "barbecue and sweet tea" and people hear, "the South." The same is true for immigrants. As hyphenated Americans we are what we eat. This will be the subject of an upcoming lecture by Nora Rubel, an assistant professor of religion and classics at the University of Rochester in New York. Rubel earned her graduate degree at UNC-Chapel Hill and returns next week talk about "The Settlement Cookbook and the Transformation of Jewish-American Identity." But first she joins guest host Laura Leslie with a preview.

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The State of Things
10:25 am
Fri October 31, 2008

Smithfield Settlement

WUNC Reporter Dave DeWitt joins host Frank Stasio to discuss the case and what the settlement means for unions in North Carolina.

Smithfield Foods and the United Food and Commercial Workers settled a federal racketeering lawsuit this week. Now the nearly five thousand workers at the plant in Tar Heel will have another chance to vote on union representation.

The State of Things
5:14 am
Wed June 4, 2008

Photographing the Ninth Ward

Church of Living God2, 2007 photograph by John Rosenthal
Credit John Rosenthal

John Rosenthal is renowned for his black and white photographs of New York City in the 1970s. The photos archived parts of the city that were vanishing and eventually disappeared: a dusty model of a ship in a bottle in the window of a social club in Little Italy, for example, or seltzer bottles stacked in wood crates.

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Health
10:57 am
Mon October 15, 2007

NC Voices: Gene Testing

Susan Davis considers what people learn from genetic testing and if it’s always helpful.

Since experts mapped the human genome, the continuous flow of new information has affected decisions people are making about their health. As part of our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," producer Susan Davis considers what people learn from genetic testing and if it’s always helpful. When Susan’s father died of Alzheimer’s disease in 1992 experts were not sure if there was a genetic link to the disease. But now they’re sure. And there’s a test she could take to find out if she has it.

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