Susan Davis

Producer, The State of Things

Donald Trump arrived in Washington, D.C., on Thursday to meet with his party's congressional leaders to hash out their differences and talk GOP unity ahead of what is likely to be a pitched general-election battle against Hillary Clinton.

First up was a private meeting with House Speaker Paul Ryan. The two arrived around 9 a.m. ET at the Republican National Committee in a session orchestrated by RNC Chairman Reince Priebus.

If Republican Party delegates are looking for an alternative to Donald Trump, Ted Cruz or John Kasich, it won't be Paul Ryan.

"I want to put this to rest once and for all," Ryan said of speculation that he could be chosen as the Republican presidential nominee this summer in a multiballot convention.

Like so many Americans approaching retirement, Virginia Republican Rep. Scott Rigell dreams about spending a little more time on the water.

"I have a little rowboat called Miss Nelly. She's 13 feet long, and there's not a motor on it. There's no radio on it. And I'm so looking forward to being on that rowboat," says Rigell.

Rigell is retiring after just six years in Congress. He was one of the 87 Republicans who rode the Tea Party wave to a pivotal GOP takeover of the House.

The top House Republican took aim at the nature of American politics in remarks viewed as a rebuke of GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump and the tone of his campaign.

"This has always been a tough business, and when passions flare, ugliness is sometimes inevitable. But we shouldn't accept ugliness as the norm," House Speaker Paul Ryan said in a speech Wednesday on Capitol Hill.

"Personalities come and go. But principles? Principles endure," Ryan added.

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Republican Sen. Marco Rubio says Donald Trump is a "con artist" who ripped off ordinary people and now wants to steal "our country."

The Florida senator also said, in a debate Thursday night, along with all of his rivals, that he will support Trump if the businessman wins the Republican nomination.

How could both statements possibly be true? As an answer, we have Rubio's somber explanation, and also an example from history.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., called out GOP candidate Donald Trump for insufficiently rebuking David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan leader, and his white supremacist politics.

"This is the kind of moment where we should be having a serious debate about the policies to restore the American idea. Instead the conversation over the last few days has been about white supremacists groups," he told reporters Tuesday after the weekly House GOP meeting.

Ryan has, for the most part, stayed out of presidential politics.

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North Carolina has a significant number of local, niche and pasture based meat producers and consumers, but it lacks enough processors to make the farm to market meat supply chain run as smoothly as possible. On December 3rd and 4th, people involved in all aspects of the meat business in North Carolina will gather in Bermuda Run to work on streamlining the process during the Carolina Meat Conference.

Eaarth

Nov 15, 2012

shrinking polar ice caps, rising temperatures, vanishing forests, acidic oceans and superstorms. Welcome to the new planet earth. A renowned environmental writer came up with this new spelling of Earth - Eaarth - because the planet we live on no longer resembles the planet we used to live on. The new planet has a new name.

Sportswriters dream of the ultimate underdog story. Chapel Hill based Tim Crothers found it in Katwe, a giant slum in Kampala, Uganda. Phiona Mutesi is currently Uganda’s leading female chess player, but a few years ago, when Tim met her, she was a child in the slums with promise.

Aiken, South Carolina is an affluent town made up of horse farms and country estates. Its pastoral splendor hides a truly ugly past. In 1926, three members of the Lowman family were sitting in jail, charged with the death of a local sheriff.

Terra Cotta

Nov 9, 2012

Mill villages were once a common feature of the North Carolina landscape from Appalachia to the Eastern counties. Here in the Triad, the Pomona Company operated a pipe factory about five miles outside of downtown Greensboro. The pipe was made out of terra cotta and the village where the factory workers lived was called Terra Cotta. The factory closed down in the 1970s, and now there’s an effort to turn the village into a living history museum.

The Day After

Nov 7, 2012

The results are in, and Democratic candidate Barack Obama is president. But while the country went blue, North Carolina is now colored solidly red. The Republican Party has its firmest grip on the state in 20 years, taking the governor’s mansion, the House and the Senate. How should we interpret the Republican victory in North Carolina in the midst of Democrats retaining the White House and strengthening their hold on the United States Senate? And what does the Republican stronghold in Raleigh mean for policy across our state?

Mipso

Nov 2, 2012

The band of three young men and one young woman used to call themselves Mipso Trio.

Now they go by Mipso after adding a fiddler. They recently released their first full length CD and they spent the summer traveling and learning new forms of music. Mipso plays Cat's Cradle Saturday night, but first they stop in to chat with guest host Isaac Davy-Aronson and play some tunes.

Man Vs. Markets

Oct 30, 2012

Paddy Hirsch makes a living breaking complex topics down into understandable parts.

He performs this role as the whiteboard guru of the radio program “Marketplace,” and he also uses his skills to explain the economy in his new book, “Man vs. Markets: Economics Explained (Plain and Simple)”. Host Frank Stasio talks to Paddy Hirsch about the battle between man and the markets.

Election News

Oct 26, 2012

While all eyes are focused on the presidential race, several interesting contests are shaping up around the state. Pat Gannon, political reporter for the Wilmington Star-News and John Frank from the News & Observer join host Frank

Stasio to get down to the nitty gritty of politics in The Wilmington area, and Wake and Johnston counties.

Is America still the land of opportunity? Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Hedrick Smith takes on that question in his new book,

“Who Stole the American Dream?” (Random House/2012). His answer is a flat, “no,” but the reasons are not so simple. From the introduction of the 401k to the deregulation of banks, Hedrick Smith joins host Frank Stasio to explain the loss of America’s prosperity

There’s a scene in Walter Bennett’s new novel "Leaving Tuscaloosa" (Fuze Publishing/2012) that will send chills down your spine. It’s 1962 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and a group of young white men ride through the African-American part of town throwing eggs and hurling racial taunts. The scene is based on an experience from Walter Bennett’s adolescence and it still bothers him.

How much influence does a first lady have on the president? According to historian William Chafe, in the case of Bill and Hillary Clinton the answer is: an incalculable amount. In his new book, "Bill and Hillary: The Politics of the Personal"

Before Allan Gurganus’s debut novel, "Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All," (Vintage/1984) spent eight months on the New York Times bestseller list, he was a kid from Rocky Mount who wanted to be a painter.

Heist

Oct 5, 2012

President Obama and Mitt Romney agree that the recession continues, the middle class is suffering and something should be done about the deficit.

Kate McGarry is the latest in a long line of female jazz musicians, and she doesn’t want to forget her forebears.

Her latest album, “Girl Talk” pays homage to the women who came before her. Host Frank Stasio talks to her about her music and her new album, and Kate McGarry plays live in the studio with guitarist Keith Ganz.

Joseph Bathanti was born and raised in Pittsburgh. He even went to college and graduate school there. So it's a testament to his passion for North Carolina that he was just announced as the Tar Heel state's newest poet laureate. Bathanti came to North Carolina in the late 1970s to be a VISTA volunteer.

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