Scott Neuman

Updated at 9:10 a.m. ET

Hong Kong's police department says it is investigating reports of excessive use of force against pro-democracy demonstrators today following some of the most intense clashes since the protests ramped up last month.

Updated at 8:43 p.m. ET

A second health care worker who has tested positive for the Ebola virus was airlifted from a Dallas hospital, where she became infected, to Emory University hospital in Atlanta for continued treatment on Wednesday.

Dr. Thomas Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says Amber Vinson, whom public records indicate is a nurse in Dallas, is "clinically stable" and that she was "quickly isolated" after her first test for Ebola came back positive on Tuesday.

This much we know: It's not a bird and it's not exactly a plane.

Beyond that, the U.S. Air Force holds all the answers. The mission of the unmanned X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, which is scheduled to touch down at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Tuesday after 22 months in orbit, has been described only vaguely as "to gather more test data."

Britain's Parliament has voted to support the recognition of a Palestinian state in a symbolic vote that follows a similar move by Sweden.

The BBC says the 274-to-12 vote in the House of Commons is being described by the chamber " 'as a contribution to securing a negotiated two-state solution' — although less than half of MPs took part in the vote."

Updated at 11:00 a.m. ET

As we reported earlier, a synod of Catholic bishops meeting at the Vatican has released an interim document that signals the likelihood of a dramatic overhaul in the church's stance on gays and lesbians, as well as its view on divorced members.

Amid rain showers and a tornado watch, police in Ferguson, Mo., made dozens of arrests Monday afternoon and into the evening of people who had gathered to protest the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, the black 18-year-old who was killed by a white police officer in August.

Turkey has agreed to train and equip a moderate opposition in Syria to help battle the self-declared Islamic State, the U.S. State Department says.

"There will be a planning team traveling to Ankara next week to continue planning that through military channels," spokeswoman Marie Harf told reporters, describing a visit to Turkey by two senior U.S. officials.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

Call it a sign of the times: An airline passenger sneezes, makes a joke about Ebola and is quickly escorted from the plane by hazmat-suited personnel.

That's what reportedly happened aboard a US Airways flight that had landed in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, shortly after arriving from Philadelphia on Wednesday.

The most powerful typhoon so far this year is barreling toward southern Japan for a landfall in Okinawa on Saturday.

North and South Korea exchanged machine gun fire over their heavily guarded border on the same day that Pyongyang's leader, Kim Jong Un, who hasn't been seen in public for more than a month, failed to show at a major national ceremony.

North Korea forces opened fire a few hours after defectors living in the South launched balloons carrying propaganda leaflets denouncing the Pyongyang regime. The balloons were meant to scatter their cargo over the border, but at least one of them popped over the South. They also carried DVDs and U.S. dollar bills.

Police and protesters in St. Louis faced off for a second night following the fatal shooting of an 18-year-old black man by an off-duty white police officer.

The killing of Vonderrit D. Myers Wednesday night by the officer who was working a second job for a security firm has prompted renewed protests in the wake of the August death of Michael Brown, also 18 and black, at the hands of a white police officer in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teen who was attacked by Taliban militants for promoting education for girls, will share the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian campaigner against exploitation of children.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee says on Nobelprize.org:

Stephen Hawking will bring his iconic synthesized voice to Pink Floyd's new album, The Endless River, set for release in November. It's the famed physicist's second collaboration with the British band, having appeared on the 1994 track "Keep Talkin' " from The Division Bell.

Rolling Stone says the new song, "Talkin' Hawkin,'" will not be a sequel to the earlier track.

Hong Kong government officials have canceled talks with student leaders, saying it is "impossible to have a constructive dialogue" because the pro-democracy activists had called for stepped-up protests if officials failed to make concessions.

Although mass demonstrations that shut down parts of Hong Kong last week have dwindled, Chief Secretary Carrie Lam reiterated her government's demand that the protests must end.

Updated at 11:35 a.m. ET

Hospital officials in Spain are saying that the condition of a nurse quarantined with Ebola has worsened.

Yolanda Fuentes, an official at the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, says of Ebola patient Teresa Romero Ramos: "Her clinical situation has deteriorated but I can't give any more information due to the express wishes of the patient."

Turkey's foreign minister says it is unrealistic to expect his country to unilaterally intervene in Syria to protect Kurds against the self-declared Islamic State.

"It is not realistic to expect Turkey to conduct a ground operation on its own," Mevlut Cavusoglu told a news conference in Ankara, according to the BBC.

An off-duty white police officer in St. Louis shot and killed an 18-year-old black man who police say opened fire during a chase in south St. Louis. The incident sparked renewed protests in a city already rocked by anger over the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in the suburb of Ferguson in August.

St. Louis Public Radio live-blogged the protests here.

Here are some photos taken of the eclipse in the U.S., China and Nepal:

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Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Thomas Eric Duncan, the 42-year-old man who contracted Ebola in Liberia and later traveled to Dallas, where he was being treated, has died, hospital officials say.

A statement from the company that runs Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, where Duncan was in isolation, read:

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

Here's a roundup of the latest developments on Ebola. We'll update this post as news happens.

White House press secretary Josh Earnest confirmed that the U.S. will conduct additional screenings of passengers arriving from the Ebola-infected region of West Africa. JFK, Newark, Chicago O'Hare, Dulles and Atlanta's Hartsfield airports will implement measures that would affect about 150 passengers a day.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

At least a dozen people have been killed as Kurds protest across Turkey demanding that the government do more to break the siege of the Syrian border town of Kobani.

For days, Turkish tanks have deployed to the border within sight of the fighting between the self-declared Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, and the the Kurdish People's Protection Committee, or the Syrian Kurdish militant group known as the YPG.

Two Americans and a German will share the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a new type of microscopy that allows researchers, for the first time, to see individual molecules inside living cells.

If you missed the total eclipse of the moon in April, you might have another chance: On Wednesday morning, the second of four lunar eclipses this year and next will occur.

Updated at 11:35 a.m. ET

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is warning that the Syrian border town of Kobani is on the verge of being captured by the self-declared Islamic State.

"Kobani is about to fall," he told Syrian refugees in the Turkish town of Gaziantep, near the border.

Islamic State fighters using tanks and heavy weapons captured from Iraqi and Syrian forces have pounded the city for days. Meanwhile, Turkish tanks have deployed near the border close to the fighting but have not intervened.

Update at 1:15 p.m. ET

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says details on the measures to screen air passengers for Ebola, mentioned Monday by President Obama, will be announced this week.

Thomas Frieden, in an interview with All Things Considered, says he's "confident that you'll hear about it this week."

"When we tell you about it this week, we'll tell you when we'll start," Frieden says.

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