Sam Sanders

Sam has worked at Vermont Public Radio since October 1978 in various capacities â

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The Two-Way
9:20 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Ancient Egyptian Relic Broken, Repaired With Glue

The funeral mask of King Tutankhamun is seen during a 2011 tour for the press in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Egypt. Officials say the mask's beard broke off last year, and was hastily glued back on.
Tara Todras-Whitehill AP

The gold and blue mask of King Tutankhamun, perhaps the most famous piece of Egyptian art in the world, has glue on its face.

Multiple sources are reporting that during a routine cleaning last year, Tutankhamun's long blue beard snapped off the mask. Curators rushed to fix it, and epoxyed the beard back on. But the fix was bad. The glue shows, and the mask is scratched.

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All Tech Considered
5:03 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

This Is True: Facebook Starts Cracking Down On Hoax News Stories

A Facebook worker at the company's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook announced it will start flagging hoax news stories in users' News Feeds.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 5:45 pm

Facebook's on a mission to make your News Feed a little more truthful.

The social media giant has announced it will start doing more to alert users when stories they're seeing in their feeds are fake. And it will allow users to start flagging hoaxes themselves. But Facebook says it won't remove false stories. And the company says it won't start "reviewing content and making a determination on its accuracy."

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The Two-Way
7:23 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

J.C. Penney Brings Back Its Print Catalog, After A 5-Year Hiatus

A J.C. Penney store in a Pembroke Pines, Fla., shopping center. The company's resurrected print catalog will be much thinner than its previous "Big Book," which was sometimes 1,000 pages.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 8:05 am

After more than five years away, and at a significantly smaller weight, J.C. Penney Co.'s print catalog is back. The company discontinued its often 1,000-page "Big Book" in 2009 and phased out several smaller, specialty catalogs over the past few years as well. But the company announced this week that it's re-entering the print catalog game.

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The Two-Way
6:17 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Public Sales Of Google Glass To End Later This Month

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears Google's Project Glass prototype publicly for the first time while attending a charity function in San Francisco. Google is suspending public sales of its first generation of Google Glass next week.
Corbett Lee AP

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 7:42 am

Google Glass Phase 1 is officially over. The Google Glass team posted a statement with the news to Google+ today. But the announcement says that Glass is not dead, it's just going through a "transition," and that the Google Glass team is "continuing to build for the future." The first, "Explorer," version of Glass was, according to the team, an "open beta" version, or basically a big, public test of the new product. The team didn't give a timeline for future versions.

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The Two-Way
8:34 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

After Foie Gras Ban Lifted In California, Some Chefs Face Threats

Karlene Bley of Los Angeles spreads her torchon of foie gras onto bread during lunch at the Presidio Social Club restaurant in San Francisco. Last week, a federal judge overturned California's ban on the dish.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 12:59 pm

Last Wednesday, a federal judge overturned California's ban on the sale of foie gras, the delicacy made from the livers of fatty ducks and geese that have often been force-fed. The ban was approved by California voters in 2004, and went into effect in 2012.

Since the ban was overturned, some chefs using foie gras in their menus have been receiving threats.

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The Two-Way
3:49 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Free-Climbers Make It To Summit Of Yosemite's El Capitan

Tommy Caldwell (top) climbs what is known as Pitch 17 and Kevin Jorgeson handles the line as they free-climb the Dawn Wall of Yosemite's El Capitan.
Tom Evans AP

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 2:02 pm

Update at 6:46pm ET:

On their 19th day of climbing, Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson reached the top of El Capitan in California's Yosemite National Park at 3:25 p.m. PT. The Los Angeles Times reports the climbers' families were waiting for them at the summit. From The New York Times:

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The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

U.Va. Reinstates Fraternity Accused In 'Rolling Stone' Rape Story

The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. The fraternity was at the center of a controversial Rolling Stone article describing an alleged gang rape at the school.
Steve Helber AP

The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity at the center of a disputed Rolling Stone account of an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia has been reinstated, according to a statement released on the school's website Monday.

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The Two-Way
7:56 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

Honda Fined $70 Million For Underreporting Deaths And Injuries

A man walks past a Honda on display at Honda Motor Co. headquarters in Tokyo. The Obama administration on Thursday, said it will fine Honda $70 million — the largest civil penalty leveled against an automaker --- for not reporting to regulators over 1,700 complaints that its vehicles caused deaths and injuries and not reporting warranty claims.
Koji Sasahara AP

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has fined Honda $70 million, for according to NHTSA, "failing to report deaths, injuries, and certain warranty claims to the federal government." NHTSA says Honda failed to report 1,729 death and injury claims tied to their vehicles between 2003 and 2014, and that the company failed to submit "early warning reports identifying potential or actual safety issues." The NHTSA also claims Honda underreported warranty and customer dissatisfactio

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The Two-Way
10:53 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Construction Begins On California's $68 Billion High-Speed Rail Line

Gov. Jerry Brown speaks to the crowd during the California High-Speed Rail Authority groundbreaking event in Fresno. The $68 billion project faces challenges from Republicans in Congress, and from Central Valley farmers suing to block the train from crossing their fields.
Gary Kazanjian AP

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 12:35 pm

One of the biggest transportation projects the country has ever seen broke ground Monday in Fresno, Calif. In theory, the much delayed high-speed rail line would allow a trip from Los Angeles to San Francisco in less than three hours, with speeds of over 200 mph.

The milestone comes six years after voters first approved an almost $10 billion bond act to fund the project. But that bond, plus about $3 billion in federal funds, still leaves the project about $55 billion short of the cost to get the line up and running by 2030.

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Remembrances
5:02 am
Mon January 5, 2015

Longtime ESPN Sportscaster Stuart Scott Dies At 49

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 7:57 am

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