Robert Kinlaw

Producer, "The State of Things"

Robert is a journalist and award-winning documentary filmmaker in the Triangle. He grew up in White Lake, a rural resort community in southeastern NC. The tales he heard about White Lake as a child would become the topic of his UNC-TV historical documentary, White Lake: Remembering the Nation's Safest Beach. In May 2017, he received a bachelor's degree in interactive multimedia from the Media and Journalism School at UNC-Chapel Hill with a minor in religious studies.

Along the way, Robert has worked as a freelance journalist and videographer for media companies across North Carolina including The News & Observer, ABC11-WTVD, UNC-Chapel Hill, Walker Marketing, College Town, The News Reporter and EducationNC. He recently released his newest documentary, Princess Warrior. It's a short film that received an Excellence in Filmmaking Award at the Carrboro Film Festival. Now, Robert is stepping into the world of radio with WUNC as a producer for The State of Things.

DRESTWN | FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

The news media industry has changed enormously in the past 10 years. Every day the line between news and entertainment is blurred further, and the Internet redefined who is considered a journalist. Host Frank Stasio spends the hour examining this blurred line and how it affects news consumers.

JAMES WILLAMORE / FLICKR

Like any good architect, North Carolina State professor Tom Barrie knows how to build houses. But perhaps more importantly, he knows why we build them.

University Press of Florida / 2017

Lyndon B. Johnson declared a “War on Poverty” in his 1964 State of the Union address, and its effectiveness has been debated ever since. In big cities like Chicago and Baltimore, the era came to be associated with protests and civil unrest.

EPICENTER PRESS / 2017

When they got married, Weaverville residents Dennis and Christine McClure never dreamed they would write a book together. That was before they learned the harrowing tale of the construction of the Alaska Highway during World War II. The U.S. government feared an invasion from the north by the Japanese and needed a way to get troops and supplies to Alaska in eight months. Commanding Army officers were reluctant to hire black regiments for the project, but they needed the manpower.