Rebecca Martinez

Morning Producer

Rebecca Martinez produces WUNC’s broadcast of Morning Edition, and occasionally fills in as host.

Before coming to North Carolina, Rebecca was a reporter and host at Wyoming Public Radio, where she created the “Upstarts” entrepreneur profile series and reported on environmental and cultural issues. She won a PRNDI award for soft feature reporting in 2012 and has edited and produced several PRNDI award-winning stories and episodes of “Open Spaces.”

Rebecca has reported on agriculture and community issues at The News Leader in Staunton, VA. She spent two years cutting tape, booking interviews and running scripts at NPR’s Washington, DC headquarters. As an intern at Team Group Media in DC, she was charged with ordering stage blood and vintage furniture for a documentary that aired on A&E.

A New Jersey native, Rebecca is a graduate of James Madison University’s School of Media Arts and Design. She plays roller derby. Yes, really.

Ways To Connect

Vegetables at the Moore Square Farmers Market Raleigh.
alli-son / Flickr

A new program is ramping up efforts to help farmers in Moore, Lee and Rockingham Counties keep their land in production and keep their businesses viable.

Rockingham Extension Agent Paige Burns says the Green Fields Initiative is a spin-off from a federal program that helps farmers directly market their produce to customers and restaurants.

An artist's rendering of a light rail stop.
Triangle Transit

Triangle Transit will present its latest plans this week for a stretch of the light rail line that would connect Orange and Durham Counties.

The organization hosts public meetings in Chapel Hill Wednesday and Durham on Thursday to focus on the stretch of light rail line connecting UNC Hospitals with the Duke and VA hospitals. Spokesman Brad Schulz says the plan addresses local communities' locations, zoning and environmental concerns.

A picture of a 3-D printer.
Stephen J. Coppedge / Wake Tech

Wake Technical Community College has opened a new advanced manufacturing center in Raleigh.

Along with a cosmetology program and a career and college preparation program, the Beltline Education Center will offer training in machining, automation and circuit technology.

 ""Especially now, with everybody going to higher technology machines, there's kind of a skills gap that we have been addressing," says Industry Training Director Bill Terrill.

A picture of running tap water.
malla_mi / Flickr

State environmental officials will decide this week whether to allow Cary, Apex, Morrisville and other Wake County communities to have an additional nine million gallons of water per day. 

They say they need it to serve their rapidly growing communities. They want more treated water moved from Jordan Lake into the Neuse River Basin instead of sending it to the Cape Fear River Basin.

Tom Fransen is Water Planning Section Chief for the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

A laser beam is projected from the Keck II telescope in Hawaii.
Paul Hirst / Creative Commons

This week, Duke University is hosting a conference with the world's foremost experts in light-based technologies.

The science of photonics studies how light interacts with matter. Fiber optic cable and lasers are two goods that were developed through photonics.

Janna Register is an organizer of this week's symposium at Duke’s Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics.

A picture of volunteers at a food drive remembering Chapel Hill shooting victims.
Nisma Gabr

Updated: Monday, March 9

Organizers say this weekend's food drive to honor the three students murdered in Chapel Hill last month was a success. Razan and Yusor Abu-Salha and Deah Barakat had been known for their community service efforts. Volunteers at the Islamic Association of Raleigh collected nearly 16,000 non-perishable food items. Organizer Nisma Gabr says, with cash donations, the local drive should be able to provide nearly 22,000 meals to people in need.  The national Feed Their Legacy food drive will continue through March 27. 

New DACA drivr's license
NCDOT

About 218,000 North Carolina voters don't have government-issued photo identification. But they'll need one to vote at the polls in next year's presidential primary.

Voters can choose from a number of official ID cards: A state-issued drivers license or learners permit, a U.S. passport or military ID, veterans ID, and certain cards for members of Native American tribes in North Carolina. 

blogs.lib.unc.edu

A memorial to the first African Americans in the U.S. Marine Corps is going up in Lejeune Memorial Gardens in Jacksonville, NC. More than 20,000 black recruits trained at Montford Point between 1942 and 1949.  

"Integration was an experiment that was tried in the military," says  Gina Francis.  

She's president of the Montford Point Marine Association Camp Lejeune Chapter 10 Ladies Auxiliary.  

A picture of black ice outside WUNC.
Rebecca Martinez / WUNC

Whether your road has been plowed or not, you might want to think twice before heading out today, and to be really careful if you do. There's black ice everywhere.

(I took a spill in the parking lot just outside our studios, which was plowed yesterday.)  

After clearing main roadways of the heavy snow yesterday, the North Carolina Department of Transportation Department plows will hit neighborhoods today.  

But NCDOT Spokesman Steve Abbott warns that black ice will make driving risky throughout the morning.

Duke Chapel, Duke University, Durham
Dave DeWitt

Campus faith leaders will gather for a panel discussion about sacred space at Duke University this afternoon.

This comes one month after Duke canceled plans to let the Muslim Student Association sound a call to prayer from the Chapel Bell Tower.

When that happened, Chapel Dean Rev. Luke Powery said he would work to keep dialogue open on the issue. Powery says this discussion will be part of a larger series of talks held at the chapel called Bridge Panels.

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