Rebecca Martinez

Morning Producer

Rebecca Martinez produces WUNC’s broadcast of Morning Edition, and occasionally fills in as host.

Before coming to North Carolina, Rebecca was a reporter and host at Wyoming Public Radio, where she created the “Upstarts” entrepreneur profile series and reported on environmental and cultural issues. She won a PRNDI award for soft feature reporting in 2012 and has edited and produced several PRNDI award-winning stories and episodes of “Open Spaces.”

Rebecca has reported on agriculture and community issues at The News Leader in Staunton, VA. She spent two years cutting tape, booking interviews and running scripts at NPR’s Washington, DC headquarters. As an intern at Team Group Media in DC, she was charged with ordering stage blood and vintage furniture for a documentary that aired on A&E.

A New Jersey native, Rebecca is a graduate of James Madison University’s School of Media Arts and Design. She plays roller derby. Yes, really.

Ways To Connect

A picture of a yellow NCDOT truck.
ncdot.org

Yellow Department of Transportation trucks have been used to disguise roving patrolmen. The North Carolina Highway Patrol used them for a pilot program in which troopers patrolled for people who illegally text while driving.

Lieutenant Jeff Gordon says it's hard for roadside troopers to see whether motorists are texting, and people are quick to stop if they see a police cruiser.

“So you need to be creative in ways of trying to get people to abide by the law. I wouldn't classify it as tricking people because it is a law, and laws need to be enforced.”

A picture of Derek Anderson.
Panthers.com

In the NFL, the Carolina Panthers defeated the Tampa Bay Buccaneers 19-17 yesterday.

Quarterback Derek Anderson started in place of Cam Newton. Newton was sidelined while recovering from a car accident Tuesday that left him with two fractures in his lower back.

Anderson threw for 277 yards and a touchdown, and Graham Gano kicked four field goals.

A picture of a cerulean warbler bird.
Mdf / Wikipedia

A new Audubon Society study says most North American winter birds are migrating farther north than they did in the 1960s.

Curtis Smalling is the North Carolina Mountain Office’s director of land bird conservation. He says population changes will sweep across North Carolina.

 @FozzyWhitt's 26-yard touchdown
Carolina Panthers via Twitter

In the NFL, the Carolina Panthers beat the New Orleans Saints yesterday, 41-10. 

Panthers Coach Ron Rivera said he was pleased to end a six-game losing streak.

“It's been a while since we've really felt good about what we felt we could do in terms of the guys that we had playing, getting used to the guys that we're playing,” Rivera says. “I think everything just kind of fell into place and came together.”

A picture of a stethoscope.
jasleen_kaur / Flickr/Creative Commons

Duke Medicine research shows that most elderly, low risk breast cancer patients receive radiation therapy after surgery. That's despite evidence that the costly and physically-taxing treatment isn't very effective with that group.

Radiation Oncologist Rachel Blitzblau authored the new study.

She says some doctors might be skeptical of the data, but patients might also push to get the treatment anyway.

 Panthers lose to Minnesota and fall to 3-8-1 on the season.
Carolina Panthers via Twitter
Frost design
RachelEllen via Flickr/Creative Commons

Forecasters are predicting another cold winter. 

The North Carolina Division of Social Services is accepting applications for the state's Low Income Energy Assistance Program.

Director Wayne Black says it's meant to help seniors, veterans and people with disabilities pay their heating bills.

“Demand is there every year for these programs, and we expect that to be the same this coming years as well,” Black said. “Obviously, how cold the winter is would have some impact as well in terms of persons coming in.”

A picture of praying hands
wnd.adreas / PhotoRee / Creative Commons

Forsyth County wants a federal judge to lift an injunction, allowing sectarian prayers from clergy before meetings.  However, the ACLU wants the court to require that the county change its prayer policy to include people of non-traditional faiths.

A 2010 District Court injunction requires the county censor any invocations – ensuring only generic prayers are offered. 

A picture of railroad ties.
LooiNL / Wikipedia

Traffic is expected to swell in the coming years between the N.C. State University Campus and Downtown Cary.

Tonight and tomorrow, the is hosting public meetings to collect feedback on safety issues at railroad crossings.

“We're trying to look at transpiration solutions, not only for cars, but also for pedestrians and bicyclists in the area," says Senior Transportation Planner Shelby Powell.

A manhole cover at night
Evan Blaser / Flickr/Creative Commons

Scott Huler explores city infrastructure for his new book, On the Grid. Listen to the stories of what's been found in Raleigh's sewers:

Here's an excerpt from the book:

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