Rebecca Martinez

Morning Producer

Rebecca Martinez produces WUNC’s broadcast of Morning Edition, and occasionally fills in as host.

Before coming to North Carolina, Rebecca was a reporter and host at Wyoming Public Radio, where she created the “Upstarts” entrepreneur profile series and reported on environmental and cultural issues. She won a PRNDI award for soft feature reporting in 2012 and has edited and produced several PRNDI award-winning stories and episodes of “Open Spaces.”

Rebecca has reported on agriculture and community issues at The News Leader in Staunton, VA. She spent two years cutting tape, booking interviews and running scripts at NPR’s Washington, DC headquarters. As an intern at Team Group Media in DC, she was charged with ordering stage blood and vintage furniture for a documentary that aired on A&E.

A New Jersey native, Rebecca is a graduate of James Madison University’s School of Media Arts and Design. She plays roller derby. Yes, really.

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Health
8:27 am
Thu March 6, 2014

“Playbook” For Local Health Professionals To Lower Health Care Costs

Public heath advocates say doctors should work more closely with health departments to solve systemic health issues in their area and lower medical costs.
Credit jasleen_kaur / Flickr

A new online guidebook aims to help connect doctors with public health agencies to fight chronic illnesses like diabetes.  Those illnesses make up 80-percent of health care costs today, compared to only 20-percent in 1900.

Duke's Department of Community and Family Medicine partnered with the de Beaumont Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to launch "Public Health and Primary Care Together: A Practical Playbook.” It suggests ways primary care and public health providers can better manage chronic disease and combat rising health care costs.

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Politics & Government
8:39 am
Wed March 5, 2014

“Kitten Season” Is Coming, And Animal Services Says That’s A Problem

March through November is 'kitten season,' a time when animal shelters are inundated with newborn litters that need homes.
Credit Jeffrey W www.flickr.com/photos/jeffreyww/4544016041/ / Flickr

Orange County Animal Services is looking for ideas from the public to handle the pet-overpopulation problem.

Director Bob Morotto said many cats are "unaffiliated" with a specific owner and haven't been spayed. They have high mortality rates and can spread disease to domesticated cats.

Morotto said the coming warm weather means "kitten season" is around the corner.  That's when cats begin having litters on litters, causing the population to spike.

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Black Ice
8:18 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Black Ice Makes For Slippery Roads, Closes Schools

The National Weather Service is warning of black ice on roadways this morning.
Credit Danielle Scott http://www.flickr.com/photos/danielle_scott/ / Flickr Creative Commons

Temperatures dropped into the teens across the Piedmont overnight, freezing yesterday's rain and snowfall. Now roadways are covered with black ice.

Gail Hartfield is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Raleigh. She says temperatures will be in the 20s all morning and won't warm to freezing or above until lunchtime.

“Just encouraging people to take it easy this morning,” Hartfield said. “If you can postpone travel until after noon, that's great and better. You'll see road conditions much improved over what they'll be this morning.”

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Environment
8:13 am
Mon March 3, 2014

The Triangle Could Get Caught Up In A Wintry Mix Today

The National Weather Service says the Triangle should expect a wintry mix today.
Credit David Park, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on 27 Dec 2009. / Wikipedia Creative Commons

Updated 10:48 a.m.:

A cold front is moving into the Triangle and creeping eastward toward the coast. Temperatures are expected to drop into the 20s later today.

Scott Sharpe is a senior forecaster at the National Weather Service in Raleigh. He said a wintry mix is expected across the region sometime after lunch.

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Environment
7:58 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Why Do NC Fishermen Want To Pay More To Fund Regulation?

The US Fish and Wildlife service requires that North Carolina pay observers to check commercial fishing gillnets and make sure they don't entangle endangered sea turtles.
Credit Pedro Ramirez, Jr. / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A trade group of North Carolina commercial fishermen has proposed that the General Assembly raise their fishing license fees to pay for regulatory measures.

Flounder fishermen sometimes get endangered sea turtles caught in their gillnets, so federal law requires that the state hire trained "observers" to check nets regularly. The General Assembly only funded the observer program until next summer, but if there's no observer at all, the state will be required to stop all gillnet fishing.

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Business & Economy
8:55 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Durham-Chapel Hill Light Rail Project: Where Those Rails Might Go

Federal regulators have given the Triangle Transit Authority the green light to begin developing a light rail line between Chapel Hill and East Durham.
Credit Triangle Transit Authority

The Federal Transit Authority (FTA) has given the green-light to begin the first steps of a 17-mile light rail project connecting Durham and Orange Counties.

The decision authorizes Triangle Transit to begin development on the project, by studying the potential environmental impact of two proposed rail routes.

Triangle Transit has put together this video "fly-through" of the proposed light rail route:

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Politics & Government
8:25 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Social Justice Groups Ask HUD To Reject Raleigh Housing Plan

Fair housing activists are asking the US Department of Housing and Urban Planning to reject Raleigh's plan to sell off 175 public housing units.
Credit US Department of Housing and Urban Planning

Several social justice groups are asking the federal government to reject a Raleigh Housing Authority plan that would sell off 175 public housing units.

Housing authority director Steve Beam has said the plan would save the city money, and that the current residents of the units would receive vouchers to subsidize their rent if they moved elsewhere.

But Bill Rowe of the N.C. Justice Center wrote to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and said this plan could result in further segregating Raleigh neighborhoods.

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Development
1:25 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Pittsboro: Planning Consultant Says Chatham Park Plan Lacks Vision

The Chatham Park project could boost Pittsboro's population to 60,000 people
Credit Screen shot from online video / Preston Development Company

Preston Development Company has big plans for Pittsboro, but an urban planning consultant says it isn't very clear what they are.

The Chatham Park project is meant to turn thousands of acres into full neighborhoods of residences and office space just 15 miles from Chapel Hill. It could turn the town into a sizeable city. The project is controversial, and Pittsboro hired the Lawrence Group in Davidson to review its master plan.

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Handguns
8:58 am
Tue February 25, 2014

26 NC Counties Make It More Convenient To Apply For A Handgun Permit

Residents of 26 North Carolina counties can apply for handgun permits online.
Credit Daniel Weber's photo stream / Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from Daniel Weber’s photostream

Residents of Wake County can now apply online for a permit to own a hand gun or to carry one concealed. Instead of going into an office, they can fill out the permit application and pay the fee online.

Wake County Sheriff Donnie Harrison said the online service makes the process more user-friendly, but just as safe as before.

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Nursing homes
7:56 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Hospitals Frequently, Quickly Readmit Medicare Recipients

A new study shows that many Medicare recipients who rehabilitate at a nursing home after a hospital stay have difficulty transitioning back to home life.
Credit SalFalko / Flickr

After a hospital stay, many seniors on Medicare will go to a nursing facility to rehabilitate before going home. But a new study from Duke University, UNC Chapel Hill and the Carolinas Center for Medical Excellence shows many of them return to the hospital before long.

Mark Toles teaches at UNC's Nursing school and is a co-author of the report. He said nursing homes often provide good care, but the transition back home can be difficult.

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