Rebecca Martinez

Morning Producer

Rebecca Martinez produces WUNC’s broadcast of Morning Edition, and occasionally fills in as host.

Before coming to North Carolina, Rebecca was a reporter and host at Wyoming Public Radio, where she created the “Upstarts” entrepreneur profile series and reported on environmental and cultural issues. She won a PRNDI award for soft feature reporting in 2012 and has edited and produced several PRNDI award-winning stories and episodes of “Open Spaces.”

Rebecca has reported on agriculture and community issues at The News Leader in Staunton, VA. She spent two years cutting tape, booking interviews and running scripts at NPR’s Washington, DC headquarters. As an intern at Team Group Media in DC, she was charged with ordering stage blood and vintage furniture for a documentary that aired on A&E.

A New Jersey native, Rebecca is a graduate of James Madison University’s School of Media Arts and Design. She plays roller derby. Yes, really.

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Toxicology
2:01 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

NC State's Database Could Revolutionize Pharmaceutical Research

The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database can be used to track information about toxic effects of therapeutic drugs.
Credit NC State University

North Carolina State University recently beefed up its toxicology database, which could help revolutionize pharmaceutical research.

NC State's Comparitive Toxicogenomics Database already cataloged the harmful health impacts of environmental chemicals, like arsenic. Then pharmaceutical giant Pfizer collaborated with the CTD to add unintended side effects of therapeutic drugs.

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FCC
8:54 am
Fri December 6, 2013

911 Is Receiving Inaccurate Location Data From Cell Phone Calls

9-1-1 dispatch centers often receiving inaccurate location information from wireless providers when distressed people call from cell phones indoors.
Credit Dave DeWitt

If you use a cell phone to call 9-1-1 from your home or office, there's a good chance the dispatch center will receive inaccurate coordinates to your location. That's according to a report from the Federal Communications Commission.

Wireless providers deliver location information to 9-1-1 centers with each call. Land line calls include a name and address. The FCC established location accuracy standards when people generally used land lines at home and cell phones on the road. But now, 70 percent of 9-1-1 calls come from cell phones.

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VETERAN JOBS
8:18 am
Wed December 4, 2013

New Office Helps Veterans Turn Miltary Experience Into A Civilian Career

Many active duty soldiers and airmen are returning home and looking for civilian jobs, while serving in the National Guard. The North Carolina National Guard Education and Employment Center is helping Guard members parlay their military experience into job skills for civilian employers.
Credit U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Veterans returning from deployment face a quickly-changing job market. Many have a difficult time explaining how their military experience has prepared them for the civilian work force. The unemployment rate for veterans is about 7-percent, on par with the national average.

The North Carolina National Guard Education and Employment Center helps guard members look for civilian jobs.

Manager and fellow veteran Austin Walther says they also help vets translate their military experience into civilian job skills.

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Traffic
7:43 am
Tue December 3, 2013

Raleigh City Council Suggests Tolls To Pay For I-540 Expansion

Raleigh Mayor Nancy McFarlane worries growing traffic congestion on roadways in the Triangle will hurt the area's economic growth.
Credit epSos via Flickr, Creative Commons

Increasingly congested roadways are worrying officials in Raleigh.

The City Council has submitted a "wish list" of road improvement projects to the North Carolina Department of Transportation. It includes a proposal to add lanes to I-540 on the north side of the city.

The council doesn't expect the state to fund the project, so it suggested paying for the 108 million-dollar expansion by setting up tolls on the roadway.

Councilwoman Mary-Ann Baldwin says she knows tolls would not be popular, but she thinks breaking up traffic jams would be.

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Hurricane Season
5:00 am
Mon December 2, 2013

Hurricane Season Ends With A Whimper

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other forecasting organizations predicted an active hurricane season for 2013, but this season turned out to be the quietest since 1995.
Credit NOAA

The Atlantic hurricane season officially ended Saturday.

It turned out to be the quietest season since 1995, and it was first time in 19 years that no major storms formed in the Atlantic basin.

This came a surprise to forecasters.

Colorado State University predicted a higher-than average hurricane season. Researcher Paul Klotzbach says they estimated a 37-percent probability of a hurricane making landfall in North Carolina in August.

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Tornado
11:28 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Tornado Causes Injuries, Damage Along Coast

Credit National Weather Service

Three people have sustained minor injuries after a tornado hit the North Carolina coast. The roof blew of an Atlantic Beach condo, with a couple inside, and flying debris hit a Carteret Community College student.

The National Weather Service office in Morehead City issued a tornado warning last night. Forecaster Lara Pagano said a water spout moved onto land.

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Business & Economy
9:39 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Busy Holiday Travel Underway

Credit epSos via Flickr, Creative Commons

Cheaper gas prices and a recovering economy could mean more people hitting the road for the Thanksgiving holiday this week.

AAA Carolinas says gas is $.07 cheaper than last year, but almost $.30 less-expensive than it was Labor Day weekend. Spokeswoman Angela Daley says 36,000 more people plan to travel by car for the holiday this year.  She says the increase in traffic is most likely a sign of economic recovery.

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Science & Technology
5:00 am
Mon November 25, 2013

"Solarize Raleigh" Could Make Solar Power More Affordable

Credit Marc Hall / North Carolina State University

Raleigh might soon have a group-purchasing program that would make it cheaper for residents to install solar panels on their homes. North Carolina Solar Center Director Steve Kalland  says solar power is popular among state utilities. They save money buying the costly technology in bulk. Kalland says homeowners are also interested in using cheaper, greener energy.

"The opportunity to do this has been somewhat constrained in North Carolina because the cost of these smaller-scale projects is somewhat higher than the large-scale projects," Kalland says.

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