Rebecca Martinez

Morning Producer

Rebecca Martinez produces WUNC’s broadcast of Morning Edition, and occasionally fills in as host.

Before coming to North Carolina, Rebecca was a reporter and host at Wyoming Public Radio, where she created the “Upstarts” entrepreneur profile series and reported on environmental and cultural issues. She won a PRNDI award for soft feature reporting in 2012 and has edited and produced several PRNDI award-winning stories and episodes of “Open Spaces.”

Rebecca has reported on agriculture and community issues at The News Leader in Staunton, VA. She spent two years cutting tape, booking interviews and running scripts at NPR’s Washington, DC headquarters. As an intern at Team Group Media in DC, she was charged with ordering stage blood and vintage furniture for a documentary that aired on A&E.

A New Jersey native, Rebecca is a graduate of James Madison University’s School of Media Arts and Design. She plays roller derby. Yes, really.

Ways To Connect

A picture of Chris Stamey playing guitar.
Gardner Campbell / https://www.flickr.com/photos/gardnercampbell/8554646232/

Chris Stamey has been on a busy streak over the past couple of years. 

He organized a tour of musicians to play Big Star's third album around the world, reunited with his band The dB's and put out his own record Lovesick Blues.  He's also been lending his talents to artists like The Old Ceremony. 

Now he's back with a new recording called "Euphoria."

The IBMA's new Exeutive Director Paul Schiminger.
Rebecca Martinez / WUNC

The International Bluegrass Music Association has announced the lineup of artists that will play the World of Bluegrass festival this fall.

Allison Krauss and Union Station Featuring Jerry Douglas will headline the event. It'll be held in Raleigh for the second year in a row. The Sam Bush band will also perform.

Paul Schiminger is the new Executive Director of the IBMA.

Schiminger says says Raleigh was very accommodating to festival goers last year.

An image of the sun
Dominik Hundhammer / https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:India_Goa_Fort_Chapora_Chapora_River.jpg

The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory for 17 counties in the eastern and southeastern part of the state today. The heat index could reach 105 degrees in the Sand Hills by early this evening.

The N.C. Department of Health and Human Services warns that these high temperatures put people—especially the elderly, the very young, and those on specific medications—at risk for heat stroke.

A view from Ocean Crest Pier, Oak Island.
Donald Lee Pardue / www.flickr.com/photos/oldrebel/4959571749/

The Brunswick County Sheriff's Office is monitoring the water off Oak Island beaches. They're on the lookout for sharks. Two teenagers were mauled Sunday afternoon, just 80 minutes and two miles apart.

Oak Island Mayor Betty Wallace is urging beach goers to learn more about shark safety and to play it safe at the ocean.

"Please don't go above, like, knee or hip-deep. Even hip-deep, the sharks can be swimming in that area. And stay amongst a group of people. Don't go out and be just one person alone out there."

A picture of a fan.
Mikael Leppä / https://www.flickr.com/photos/54544400@N00/5925014448

North Carolina is in the heat of the summer, just take a look at the thermometer. In the Sand Hills, the temperatures are in the triple digits.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Tim Armstrong said this is the hottest weather the Fayetteville area has seen in three years, and that temperatures could climb to 104 degrees Tuesday.

Armstrong said because of the humidity, it could feel more like 110 degrees, and that is a dangerous.

A picture of Jay Faison.
SnapAV

A conservative tech entrepreneur has created a foundation dedicated to finding clean-energy solutions to the climate crisis.

Jay Faison has several defining characteristics. He is a Republican, a member of a wealthy Charlotte family, and a supporter of GOP campaigns in North Carolina and nationally. Faison founded the ClearPath Foundation in December, and recently announced that he is giving $175 million to a campaign to get Republicans talking about market-based solutions to climate change. 

A picture of the Orange County Historical Museum
Alexisrael / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Leaders of the Orange County Historical Museum want permission from the City of Hillsborough to remove the phrase "Confederate Memorial" from the building's facade. The city owns the building and leases it to the museum.

It was once a library, built in the 1930s with funding from the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the federal government.

Museum Director Candace Midgett says museum operators would like the words removed from the building's exterior.

A picture of hands texting on a smartphone.
jhaymesisvip / flickr.com/photos/jhaymesisvip/6497720753

Cary's 911 Communications Center can now communicate with people via text message.

Supervisor Doug Workman said this option is available for people who can not make a phone call to dispatch.

"This is very useful in a domestic violence situation, where you as the victim would be able to contact the police where you're not having to speak it out," Workman says.

He adds that it also serves people who are deaf and hard of hearing.

A picture of a stethoscope.
jasleen_kaur / Flickr/Creative Commons

The State Budget Office says North Carolina owes Medicaid providers nearly two years of back pay.

That's because the state's computerized payment system NCTracks improperly paid for services of elderly poor people eligible for both Medicaid and Medicare.

Adam Linker is a health care access advocate at the North Carolina Justice Center. He says it's not yet clear how MUCH the state owes providers, or how it intends to reimburse them.

Moore County Schools

Updated Tuesday, June 9 at 6:30 a.m.

The Moore County School Board has reinstated the embattled schools superintendent, after four board members resigned.

The board voted suddenly Thursday to buy out the contract of Superintendent Bob Grimesy, who is popular among parents, teachers and government officials.

State Representative James Boles called for the resignation of five board members.

Multiple media outlets report that a smaller school board voted 4-1 last night to reinstate Grimesy.

Wednesday, June 8

Pressure is building on Moore County School Board members after the Board voted to fire the county's popular Superintendent. 

Without explanation, the school board voted 5-to-3 Thursday to fire Robert Grimesey.

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