Phoebe Judge

Host / Reporter

Phoebe Judge is an award-winning journalist whose work has been featured on a numerous national radio programs. She regularly conducts interviews and anchors WUNC's broadcast of Here & Now. Previously, Phoebe served as producer, reporter and guest host for the nationally distributed public radio program The Story. Earlier in her career, Phoebe reported from the gulf coast of Mississippi. She covered the BP oil spill and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina for Mississippi Public Broadcasting and National Public Radio. Phoebe's work has won multiple Edward R. Murrow and Associated Press awards. Phoebe was born and raised in Chicago and is graduate of Bennington College and the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

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Arts & Culture
2:32 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Fight For A Fair Wage: A 'Full Frame' Story

The Hand That Feeds makes its world premiere at Full Frame this weekend.

Hot & Crusty is one the chain delis in New York City that line most street corners, offering fast, affordable food one step up from the fare you might receive at big national chains like McDonalds, or Subway.   Many of the employees at chains such as these are undocumented workers.  They are men and women that are here in this country with no papers, working long hours without the benefit of insurance or job security.  The new documentary ‘The Hand That Feeds’ follows the plight of one group of workers fighting for better working conditions at a Hot & Crusty restaurant on the Upper

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Sports
5:14 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

'It's Everything. It's Personal' - NCCU's LeVelle Moton On Coaching In NCAA Tourney

LeVelle Moton
Credit LeVelle Moton via Twitter

Updated Saturday March 22, 2014:

LeVelle Moton's Twitter profile says it all:

"Basketball is what I do, not who I am. Child of God, Hattie Mac's Baby boy. Head Coach At North Carolina Central University."

Moton seemed destined to be the head coach at NCCU. He grew up in Raleigh, and lived with his mother in a housing project. He was a McDonald's All American Nominee at Enloe High School, was Wake County Player of the Year, and was selected for All State.

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Race and Politics
3:44 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

On Racism: 'This Is Our Heritage. You Can't Get Away From It'

Ta-Nehisi Coates is writer and Senior Editor at The Atlantic
Credit The Lavin Agency

Last month, Michael Dunn was convicted of attempted murder, after firing several rounds into an SUV of young black men. Jordan Davis, a 17-year-old, was killed in the incident. Dunn is 47, and he is white. Dunn invoked the "Stand Your Ground Law" to defend his actions, and the jury was deadlocked on whether to charge him for Davis's murder. He'll face a retrial this summer.

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The State of Things
12:45 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Dance Performance Brings History To Stage

Protest for economic equality
Credit creative commons

Operation Breadbasket was an economic program of the civil rights movement that worked to negotiate better hiring practices for African-American people. North Carolina State University's dance company, Panoramic Dance Project, is performing a mixed media modern dance inspired by the historical events. "Operation Breadbasket" will be performed March 27th and 28th at the university. 
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The State of Things
12:10 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

A Poet's View Of Che Guevara

Che on My Mind
Credit dukeupress.edu

In her new book, Che On My Mind (Duke University Press Books, 2013) Margaret Randall, renowned poet and activist, considers the power and the limitations of Che Guevara as a symbol. She will read at the Internationalist Bookstore and Community Center in Chapel Hill tonight at 7 p.m. 

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The State of Things
11:42 am
Wed March 19, 2014

"Honor Diaries" Explores Violence In The Name of Honor

Honor Diaries: A documentary about honor-based violence.
Credit honordiaries.com

Women around the world experience honor-based violence ranging from forced child marriage to female genital mutilation. The documentary "Honor Diaries" features the stories of nine women and their fight against this violence in their own communities.

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The State of Things
11:22 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Sunshine Week Inspires Dialogue About Open Government

Sunshine Week encourages conversation about open government.
Credit sunshineweek.org

This week is Sunshine Week, a time when newsmakers and advocates push for increased transparency in government. North Carolina public records law gives citizens and journalists equal access to information and mandates that all requests be responded to "as promptly as possible."

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The State of Things
5:00 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Today In Coal Ash: Federal Testimony And A Chatham County Investigation

A Duke Energy power plant and coal ash ponds outside Asheville, North Carolina.
Credit Zen Sutherland

  

A federal grand jury has been impaneled to hear evidence about the relationship between Duke Energy and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). At the same time, that state agency is investigating the discharge of water by the utility at a site in Chatham County. Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with WUNC's Jeff Tiberii about the latest developments on The State of Things today.

First, the court proceedings:

The highly criticized relationship between Duke Energy and DENR is the focus of the federal investigation. The U.S. Attorney's office is demanding that Duke Energy and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources hand over records of wire transfers, receipts and any items of value that might have passed between the two.  Twenty current and former state employees have been called to testify before a grand jury about their relationship with Duke Energy. The company and state utility commission also received subpoenas. 

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Law
1:54 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

NC's First Female Judge Had No Legal Training Whatsoever

NC's first female judge, Mamie Dowd Walker
Credit Milo Pyne

Judge Mamie Dowd Walker was a widow with two children when she was appointed the first female judge in North Carolina in 1934.  It was a first for North Carolina not only because Judge Walker was female, but also because she had no legal training.  But her grandson Milo Pyne says his grandmother "needed the money." 

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Politics & Government
11:16 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Do You Live In North Or South Carolina? Some Aren't Sure

Longleaf Pines in North Carolina
Credit USFWS/Jack Culpepper

Imagine that you've lived in North Carolina, near the South Carolina line, for generations. Maybe your grandfather worked the land, your father too, and now you. And one day, a state official comes to your door tell you that you actually live in South Carolina. You'll need to change your driver's license. Rather than Governor Pat McCrory, you will now be paying attention to what Governor Nikki Haley is proposing. You've become a Sandlapper, not a Tar Heel.

That's exactly what is happening now.

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