Nicole Campbell

Producer, "The State of Things"

When you go to a poetry slam, you’ll probably notice the majority of spoken word artists who hit the stage are men. But that’s not representative of the spoken word community at large. Starr, a slam poet, will represent the Bull City Slam team next year in the 2013 Women of the World Poetry Slam in Minneapolis. Host Frank Stasio talks to her about what it’s like to be a woman in the slam world.

Drinking Water: A History
duke.edu

When your body’s feeling crummy, someone will likely tell you to remedy it by drinking more water. Whether it’s for clearer skin or lower anxiety, people have a lot of faith in the healing power of this liquid. But water isn’t a plentiful cure-all everywhere. For many people living in places bordered by water masses, it’s hard to gain access to this necessity.

Jim Lee - Spectives
thecarrack.org

As a native to Durham, Jim Lee has always had a knack for looking in places others often miss. His newest exhibit, Spectives, gives his audience a comprehensive look at his work documenting nature through photography, found objects and walks along Durham’s railroad tracks.

briarsdocumentary.com
briarsdocumentary.com

In 1942, Clarence and Florence Jordan helped found Koinonia right outside of Americus, Georgia. They sought to create an intentional community where residents would live and practice equality and integration. Koinonia, and many other Christian intentional communities like it, thrive today.

In, 2008, Renee Alexander Craft lost one of her best friends to breast cancer. Craft says that cancer targets an individual, but when someone has it, that person’s whole community has it. As an act of healing, Craft wrote "I Will Love You Everywhere Always" (2012), to celebrate her friend’s life.

People sometimes say that voting is the most effective way for everyone to participate in a democracy, but that’s not the way it started. In Athens, democracy began with only men gathering in public places to decide the future of their community. How did we go from there to here? Democracy ended in ruins in Athens; will it happen that way in the United States?

Social media, early voting, polls, the financial markets, even the weather, they are all factors in next Tuesday’s election. When Americans pick a president, we also pick our congressional delegations and numerous state and local officials, but getting people to pay attention to the races happening down the ballot from the president can be tough. Guest host Isaac Davy-Aronson will talk about why with Jennifer Wig, the assistant editor at the Raleigh Public Record; and Angie Newsome, the director and editor of The Carolina Public Press.

In 2008, it would have been difficult to go to a college campus in the United States and forget we had an election coming up. The young people brought out about 22 million votes to the election then, but will it happen again? Are people still fired up and ready to go on America’s campuses? And how connected to politics are today’s college students anyway?

In 1970, Beverly Guy-Sheftall helped create the first women’s studies department at Spelman College, and it became the first and only department of its kind at a historically Black college.

As the presidential election lingers only a week away, people all over the country are steadily watching the polls, but what exactly do polls do for the American audience? Do polls somehow change voters’ minds or inspire the once disinterested to vote?

Abraham Galloway was a fugitive slave hailing from Wilmington, North Carolina, who became a union spy, a radical abolitionist and a state senator. However, you'll rarely, if ever, see Galloway's name in a history textbook. For 10 years, author and historian David Cecelski researched and attempted to uncover the life of Abraham Galloway.

Bill Manbo’s family was just one of many forcibly relocated into Japanese internment camps during World War II. He recorded his time there on a 35 millimeter camera and eventually passed the photos along to Eric Muller, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Kate McGarry is the latest in a long line of female jazz musicians, and she doesn’t want to forget her forebears.

Her latest album, “Girl Talk” pays homage to the women who came before her. Host Frank Stasio talks to her about her music and her new album, and Kate McGarry plays live in the studio with guitarist Keith Ganz.

Before the 1970s, opportunities for Black women in film were limited. African-American actresses were often relegated to roles as “mammies” or “tragic mulattos.”

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