Nicole Campbell

Producer, "The State of Things"
Haben Girma was the first deaf-blind student to graduate from Harvard Law.
Harvard Law

At the age of 15, Haben Girma had danced, skied, kayaked and traveled to Mali. And although that’s a lot for any young person to experience, Haben was doing so while deaf and blind.

  

Ryan White

Freda Kelly was a 17 year-old typist in Liverpool when she was asked to work for a band that would become legends: The Beatles. For eleven years, Kelly was a loyal friend and secretary to the group. For more than fifty years, Kelly stayed mum about her experiences, but a new documentary “Good Ol’ Freda,” spotlights her story and her time with The Beatles.

Ironing Board Sam
www.musicmaker.org/ / Music Maker Relief Foundation

  Ironing Board Sam has been playing rhythm and blues professionally since he was 16 years old in Rock Hill, SC. He's now 73, living in Chapel Hill and his passion for music-making is as strong as ever. Sam is part of Hillsborough's Music Maker Relief Foundation, and he's just released a new album, “Going Up.”

This segment was originally broadcast on January 11, 2013. The following is new information:

Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture by Ytasha Womack
ytasha womack / http://www.iafrofuturism.com/

    

Recently, the Voyager One space craft entered interstellar space, the farthest a man-made object has ever traveled. But as we push the bounds of space travel, the number of people of color in space-related careers remains low. This weekend, Duke University is holding the first conference to explore the intersection of identity and space exploration, “Race in Space.” Host Frank Stasio speaks with conference participants about the involvement of people of color in space-related careers.

Zero to Eighty Over Unpaved Roads: A Memoir
Evelyn McNeill / evelynmcneill.com/

  

Wikimedia

During the government shutdown, North Carolina became the first state to cut funding for the social welfare programs WIC and TANF. And while Governor Pat McCrory pushed to reopen the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the status of many social services still hung in the balance. Host Frank Stasio talks with, Christina Gibson-Davis, a professor of public policy and sociology at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy, about the cuts to social services.

Wood Pellets
Credit: Wikimedia

  The European Union recently set an aggressive goal for 20 percent of its energy to come from renewable sources by 2020. They turned to the American South as the primary supplier of wood pellets, a renewable alternative to coal. But some environmentalists claim pellets are not a viable carbon-neutral resource and the pellet industry is fostering environmentally hazardous logging practices.

Jeff Tiberii

  

The Forsyth County Board of Commissioners recently voted to tentatively allow permit holders to carry concealed handguns in Tanglewood Park.

UNC Press

  

The struggle for education equality in North Carolina was hard-fought for more than four decades.

It was not only a struggle for facilities that were equal to white schools, but a fight for integration and civic inclusion. Host Frank Stasio talks with Sarah Caroline Thuesen, author of “Greater Than Equal: African American Struggles for Schools and Citizenship in North Carolina, 1919-1965,” and a professor of history at Guilford College.

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

    

The Spartan Jazz Collective from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro is made up of students and faculty.

The group will perform a retrospective of work by percussionist composer and native North Carolinian Max Roach. The Spartan Jazz Collective is Chad Eby, Melvin Holland, Evan Ringel, Jonathan Wiseman, Thomas Linger, Aaron Gross, Kassem Williams, and Dr. Neeraj Mehta.

The Capitol Building On First Day Of Federal Government Shutdown
http://www.flickr.com/photos/divaknevil/ / flickr.com

  

Wikimedia Commons

Warning: This segment contains a story about sexual violence.

Greensky Bluegrass
J. Van Butler / J. Van Butler

Greensky Bluegrass is one of more than 50 bands coming to Raleigh this week for the Wide Open Bluegrass Festival. The Michigan group’s hybrid sound draws on the influence of rock ‘n roll and jam bands. The multidimensionality of their music gives them a mainstream music fan base beyond the bluegrass scene. Greensky Bluegrass is Dave Bruzza, Anders Beck, Mike Devol, Mike Bont, and Paul Hoffman. 

http://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1366560170l/17605531.jpg

    

For more than 25 years, author Allan Gurganus has written about the mystical town of Falls, North Carolina.

In his newest book, "Local Souls," the town undergoes its most modern transformation (Liveright, 2013). Gurganus returns to Falls with three different novellas that explore love, community, and family. Host Frank Stasio talks with Allan Gurganus about "Local Souls."

Brian Ulrich

  In the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, then-President George W. Bush gave a speech encouraging Americans to boost "participation and confidence in the American economy."

Elizabeth Cotten conducting a guitar workshop at the 1968 Newport Folk Festival
http://www.flickr.com/photos/63204614@N08/ / flickr

In the early 1900s in Carrboro, a young Elizabeth Cotten took her brother's handmade guitar from under his bed.

She started playing the instrument upside down - with her right hand on the fret and strumming with her left hand. The young woman went on to become a famous blues and folk musician. Next weekend, Carrboro will dedicate a historic marker to honor Cotton’s legacy and ties to the town.

Buck: A Memoir by MK Asante
MK Asante / mkasante.com

M.K. Asante grew up in what he calls "Killedelphia," bouncing in and out of schools, hanging out in gangs, and struggling with troubled parents. Discovering a love of writing opened his eyes to new opportunities. His new book, Buck: A Memoir follows his coming-of-age story growing up in Philadelphia (Spiegel & Grau, 2013).

In 1989, Safdar Hashmi was an activist, artist and communist performing a protest play Halla Bol! or "Raise Your Voice!" outside municipal polling places near Delhi, India.

Transforming Knowledge: Public Talks on Women's Studies 1976-2011 by Jean Fox O'Barr
http://www.shewrites.com/ / She Writes Press

    

Jean Fox O'Barr was denied a teaching job at Duke University in the late 1960s. The reason? Her gender.  But later a few years later, with a shortage of professors, they asked O’Barr to join the political science department. She went on to found the Duke women's studies department and co-founded the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture. 

The four girls killed in the bombing (Clockwise from top left, Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Denise McNair)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/76587168@N06/ / flickr.com

  

On September 15th, 1963, the Ku Klux Klan bombed 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The explosion killed four little girls and injured 22 others. In the violent aftermath of the bombing, two little boys were murdered.

Thomas Walker
U.S. Attorney's Office (Eastern District)

In the wake of a public reprimand by the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, the eastern district federal prosecutors office implemented new policies and procedures. The office was scolded by the court for discovery abuse including a pattern of withholding evidence from defendants. 

Tim Okamura

The UNC Stone Center is celebrating 25 years of promoting black scholarship in the Chapel Hill community. The Center’s first exhibit of the season features the portraiture work of Brooklyn-based artist Tim Okamura. "This Story Has Not Yet Been Told…" draws from Brooklyn life, hip-hop culture, and storytelling.

Wars in Syria
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95569241@N07/ / Mac Design Studio

On this week’s news roundtable, the panel shares their views on the latest headlines. They’ll discuss a broad range of international, national and local issues including American involvement in Syria, violence against women and the state of the economy in North Carolina. 

Little Green Pig's production of Our Town
littlegreenpig.com / Little Green Pig

    

Durham's Little Green Pig theatre company is performing the classic story of small town life, "Our Town.” But this show differs from traditional performances of the production because it features an all-black cast.

Culinary Historian and Judaics Scholar, Michael Twitty
http://www.stagville.org/events/ / Afroculinaria

This summer, celebrity chef Paula Deen’s use of the N-word stirred controversy. Food historian Michael Twitty wrote an open letter to Deen criticizing her appropriation and misinterpretation of African-American culinary tradition. Twitty will cook and speak about his work at Historic Stagville Plantation's Harvest Festival in Durham this Saturday, September 7th.  

Fast Food Strikes, NYC, July 2013
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mtumesoul/ / flickr

Across the country today, thousands of fast food workers are walking off their jobs to demand a living wage and the right to unionize. WalMart employees have also walked off the job as part of an effort to force the company to change their policies. WalMart workers will again strike nationwide next week.

Acting White? Rethinking Race in Post-Racial America
http://global.oup.com/ / Oxford University Press

During President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign, some public discourse focused on the “blackness” of the President. Some on the right critiqued him for being “too black,” but some on the left claimed he was “acting white.”

“President Barack Obama, has these public moments, where he has to deal with the facts of race. He’s in this complicated situation where he has to appeal to members of multiple racial groups and have them all support him,” states Mitu Gulati, professor at Duke Law. “And then these instances occur as with Trayvon Martin, and he has both of these groups watching him so very carefully to see how Black is he or how Black isn’t he.”

Host Frank Stasio talks with Gulati and his co-author and fellow law professor Devon Carbado of UCLA School of Law. Their book, “Acting White? Rethinking Race in 'Post-Racial' America,” (Oxford University Press; 2013) addresses the question: “What does it mean to ‘act white’?”

Madhu Beriwal (on right cutting the ribbon) when headquarters were moved from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to the Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
iem.com / innovative emergency management

  

In 1985, Madhu Beriwal was conducting hurricane research for the state of Louisiana. She charted possible directions and outcomes that different storm conditions would bring to New Orleans. Looking at the atlas in 2005, Beriwal said it almost perfectly predicted the severity of Hurricane Katrina. 

Submitted by Mandy Carter / Bayard Rustin Commemorative Alliance

    

Five decades ago, more than 200,000 people from all over the country gathered on the National Mall to call for racial and economic equality. Next week, participants will once again gather in Washington to mark the anniversary of the March on Washington, a pivotal moment in American history.

Julius Chambers
Citizenplastic / commons.wikimedia.org

In 1948, William Chambers, a black maintenance worker in Montgomery County, NC was denied payment for a job by a white customer. William Chambers spent many afternoons searching for an attorney to represent him, but all the white lawyers he asked refused. William told this story to his son, Julius Chambers, who then vowed to become a lawyer and fight for justice.

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