Nicole Campbell

Producer, "The State of Things"
Nyuol Tong, Duke student and writer, from South Sudan
http://www.selfsudan.org/ / Self Sudan

  

When Nyuol Tong was six years old, his family was caught in the crossfire of the Sudanese Civil War. After living in Sudanese refugee camps, and Egypt, Tong made his way to the United States. 

When Nyuol reflects on his life in Sudan and Egypt, he talks about the constant shifting he had to do in order to survive. 

USDA protest
USDA photo by Anson Eaglin. / flickr

Starvation is often considered a problem distant from the American experience.

But for many United States citizens, hunger is a way of life. And many of them live right here in North Carolina.

Member of Peter Lamb and the Wolves
Peter Lamb / Peter Lamb and the Wolves

Peter Lamb and the Wolves know a great deal about community love and support. Their last two albums have been completely crowd-funded through Kickstarter. And although Peter Lamb says it doesn't alter the way they make music, he'll tell you it definitely turns up the heat. 

Ricky Skaggs holding mandolin
rickyskaggs.com / Ricky Skaggs

Ricky Skaggs was just five years old when he first got his hands on a mandolin. Many boys in small town Kentucky were playing the guitar or the fiddle, but not the mandolin. With a rich and varied career in bluegrass and country, Skaggs is known for that masterful mandolin sound. 

suey park smiling
Suey Park

Lots of people are talking about race on Twitter this week, using the hashtag #NotYourAsianSidekick.

The person who started the conversation is the writer Suey Park. She says that there are so many stereotypes: Asians are submissive, good at math and science, and play the violin. She wants to have a fuller conversation about Asian Americans.

This minute and a half BBC video is a good intro to Suey and the topic:

Anthony Kearns singing at the Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.
gageskidmore / Flickr

Twenty-two year-old Anthony Kearns was working in sales when he decided to try out for the radio competition "Ireland's Search for a Tenor." He earned an in-person audition after singing "Danny Boy" over the phone. After hitchhiking across Ireland, he won the entire competition.  

Host Frank Stasio talks with Anthony Kearns, member of The Irish Tenors about his journey. The Irish Tenors are performing tonight at the Carolina Theater in Durham.   

Black and White Portrait of Billy Taylor sitting at piano, New York, N.Y., ca. 1947
Library of Congress via Flickr

Eastern North Carolina has yielded a rich crop of nationally recognized African American musicians. People like jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk.

But many musicians hailing from this part of the state have gone unnoticed. A new book, African American Music Trails of Eastern North Carolina, takes readers on a musical journey through this overlooked region.

Here are five musicians whose roots run deep in Eastern Carolina:

Derrick Ivey (Left) as C.P. Ellis and Lakeisha Coffery (Right) as Ann Atwater
manbitesdogtheater.org / Manbites Dog Theater

    

  In 1971, civil rights activist, Ann Atwater, and ku klux klan grand exalted cyclops, C.P. Ellis chaired a community meeting to handle violence in the recently desegregated Durham school system. And those meetings started a unexpected lifelong friendship between the two. A play by Mark St. Germain retells the story of this unlikely friendship in the play, Best of Enemies

African American Music Trails of Eastern North Carolina
uncpressblog.com / unc press

Maceo Parker, Billy Taylor, Thelonius Monk: many soul and jazz legends have North Carolina roots. The new book "African American Music Trails of Eastern North Carolina," creates a road map of African American musical history.

South Sudanese Writer and Duke Student, Nyuol Tong
selfsudan.org / Self Sudan

When Nyuol Tong was six years old, his family was caught in the crossfire of the Sudanese Civil War. After living in Sudanese refugee camps, and Egypt, Tong made his way to the United States. 

When Nyuol reflects on his life in Sudan and Egypt, he talks about the constant shifting he had to do in order to survive. 

Hillside High School Marching Band
https://www.facebook.com/HHSBAND

  

The Hillside High School Marching Hornets is one of the premier marching bands in the state. The Durham band hails from one of North Carolina's only historically-black schools. Generations of families in Durham have marched with the Hornets. A new documentary, One Band Indivisble, follows a year in the life of the Marching Hornets. 

Durham Police Department badge.
City of Durham

    

Seventeen year-old Jesus Huerta died of a gunshot wound in the back of a Durham police car last month. His death sparked protests outside of Durham Police Department Headquarters.

NC Department of Health and Human Services logo
NC Department of Health and Human Services

  

North Carolina's Department of Health and Human Services' policy manual requires justification memos whenever the department hires contract workers.

A records request by the News and Observer shows several hirings were made without the proper documentation. Host Frank Stasio talks with Joe Neff, investigative reporter for the News and Observer, about the department’s procedures.

Duke University
Duke University

Since 2010, the number of American Indian students in the UNC system has been declining.

Today, there are 87 American Indian students in a student population of 19,000 undergraduate students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Wikimedia Commons

  

Many people know that during the Trail of Tears, tens of thousands of American Indians were forced to walk to Oklahoma.

Wikimedia Commons

    

The Lumbee are the largest American Indian nation east of the Mississippi River and many of them live in Robeson County, North Carolina.

Many of the Lumbee people worked in the manufacturing business in the county, but since the 1980s and 1990s, the industry has declined. Students and faculty at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke have studied the intersection between Lumbee identity and working-class life in Robeson County.

An employee performs quality control on clothing made at the Mortex textile mill in Wendell, North Carolina
USDAgov, via Flickr

  

For decades, the textile industry was an essential part of North Carolina’ economy. But the industry took a huge hit in the early 2000s due to outsourcing and high rates of automation.

Hachette Book Group

  

Lionel Vatinet was a 16-year old in France when he decided he wanted to devote his life to baking bread.

He became an esteemed Master Baker, and then made his way to the states. Vatinet is the owner of La Farm Bakery in Cary. Host Frank Stasio talks with Vatinet about his first book, "A Passion for Bread: Lessons from a Master Baker"(Little, Brown and Company; 2013).

Wikimedia Commons

  

Today is transgender day of remembrance, a day designated to remembering transgender people who have lost their lives to violence this past year.

Duke University Press

    

When the economic bubble burst in Japan in 1991, many of its citizens lost faith in their nation.

technosociology.org

  

Zeynep Tufekci was only 16 years old and living in her native Turkey when she became a computer programmer.

The Steep Canyon Rangers
http://www.steepcanyon.com/

    

2013 has been a huge year for the western North Carolina bluegrass band Steep Canyon Rangers. The band released a new album “Tell The Ones I Love,” won a Grammy award for “Best Bluegrass Album,”  and toured with actor Steve Martin. 

waste management system for a 900State of the art lagoon  head hog farm in Georgia.
Jeff Vanuga / Photo courtesy of USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.

The struggle over hog waste lagoons in North Carolina is decades long. Historically, the lagoons have caused several fish kills and contaminated the public water supply. 

Lawrence Earley Photography

For decades the primary industry of the Core Sound was the fishing industry which used workboats. Although the fishing business in the area has declined, workboats remain a source of social memory for residents there. 

To Right These Wrongs  The North Carolina Fund and the Battle to End Poverty and Inequality in 1960s America
UNC Press / uncpress.unc.edu

    

In 1963, almost a quarter of North Carolinians were living in poverty. 

Governor Terry Sanford and his political associates decided it was time to get creative about building a strategy for eradicating poverty in the state. And with that, the North Carolina Fund was born.  The Fund was a way to sponsor community organizing initiatives in local communities across the state, particularly by getting poor people involved directly.

UNC Press

    

In the 1600s, European settlers invaded Eastern North Carolina where nations like the Tuscarora, Machapunga, and Core Indians resided.

By Gerard Gaskin

In the late 1960s, black and latino members of the LGBTQ community were searching for a space of their own outside of white drag shows. Many of them started hosting balls, or pageants where they could perform in a series of competitions and be judged by their peers. Since then the ballroom scene has become a global phenomenon. 

iwpr.org

    

Earlier this year the Institute for Women’s Policy Research conducted a study regarding the status of women and girls in North Carolina, commissioned by the North Carolina Women's Council

A student holds a sign in support of teachers outside a demonstration at Durham's EK Powe Elementary School.
Dave DeWitt

    

Yesterday, hundreds of North Carolina teachers staged “walk-ins” to protest recent cuts to spending and another year without raises.

But many Republican lawmakers claim the state’s education budget is actually higher than it has ever been. Host Frank Stasio talks with Dave DeWitt, WUNC’s Raleigh Bureau Chief and Education Reporter about the politics behind yesterday’s walk-ins.

Bazillion Points

When Laina Dawes was eight years-old, she sat in front of her television watching the made-for-television movie “Kiss Meets The Phantom of the Park.”  Soon after, her parents gave her Kiss’ Double Platinum record, and later followed an obsession with bands like Judas Priest and Black Sabbath.  Laina Dawes is a bona fide metal head. But her fandom is complicated, though it probably shouldn’t be, by the fact that Laina is a black woman.

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