Nicole Campbell

Producer, "The State of Things"
Louis Armstrong Master of Modernism Yellow background behind black and white portrait of Louis Armstrong with trumpet
http://books.wwnorton.com/ / W.W. Norton and Company

    

Louis Armstrong is a integral figure in American popular music. And although many know him for his 1960s hits like "Hello Dolly" and "What a Wonderful World," his career in the 1920s and 30s really set a precedent for jazz vocals and instrumentals for future generations. 

Jack the Radio in a photobooth
Jack the Radio / Jack the Radio

  

Jack the Radio started as two North Carolina State University students creating music in their dorm room. And nearly a decade later, they are four players bigger and they have embraced their southern rock sound. 

The Deepest Secret by Carla Buckley
carlabuckley.com / Random House

 

Buckley explores this relationship and the lengths a mother will go to in order to protect her son in her newest novel, The Deepest Secret (Random House; 2014). Host Frank Stasio talks with Buckley about the mother-son relationship and her writing.

Pastor James Gailliard
wordtab.net / Word Tabernacle Church

    

Hundreds of community members gathered at the Word Tabernacle Church in Rocky Mount to discuss solutions for community violence after four teenagers were shot behind the church last month. Many at the meeting said an increase in gun availability on the streets of Rocky Mount contributes to the problem.  

Phyllis Galembo / Phyllis Galembo

When people don masks and costumes in the United States, it is often for Halloween or to root for their favorite sports team. But in Africa and the Caribbean, masking carries a much deeper meaning.
 

Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men Of The South
sweettea-theplay.com / Sweet Tea The Play

Television shows like Glee, Will and Grace, and Modern Family portray gay identity as white, northern, and secular. But that was far from E. Patrick Johnson's reality growing up in Hickory, North Carolina. Johnson decided to travel across the South to unearth stories of African American gay men and document his findings in the book Sweet Tea: Gay Black Men of the South (UNC Press/2008).

An image from Ice Music, photographed by UNC Professor Brooks de Wetter-Smith within a Swiss glacier
Brooks de Wetter Smith / Ice Music

 After numerous trips to Antarctica, Brooks de Wetter-Smith developed a fascination with ice. He says this overlooked necessity gives us water and supports our rivers. But it is not just utilitarian. The element is visually-magnificent, and creates unique sounds as it transforms from ice to water. 

Brooks described to Host Frank Stasio what it was like exploring Antarctica, a massive icy landscape, and how that made him think twice about the ice back home. 

Photo of George Zimmerman
www.flickr.com/photos/84276460@N06/ / flickr.com

  

George Zimmerman, the man who shot Trayvon Martin but was acquitted, is signed up to fight in a pay-per-view celebrity boxing match. The most likely opponent for the March 1st match-up is rapper DMX. The proposed fight has elicited an array of responses, from proponents asking DMX to avenge Martin’s death to people pleading with DMX not to participate. In many ways the fight resembles the activities of ancient Rome, where gladiators would fight for their lives in a public arena and the spectacle distracted the masses from other concerns.

Left to right: Christian Adams - cello / Nathan Spain - drums / Peter Vance - guitar and vocals / Gabriel Reynolds - piano and vocals / Mary Koenig - vocals and auxiliary percussion / Eli Howells - violin
Morning Brigade / http://morningbrigademusic.com

    

Above Our Heads, the first album by Chapel Hill band Morning Brigade, took an in-depth look at love and relationships. Their second album offers an even more vulnerable examination of these themes. Songwriter and vocalist Peter Vance finds inspiration and catharsis in writing about his personal history and medical struggles.

The Muslims Are Coming! / A film by Negin Farsad and Dean Obeidallah

Since 9/11, some news accounts portray Muslim-Americans only as terrorist threats. These stories create stereotypes in the minds of the American public. A new film, The Muslims Are Coming, co-directed by Negin Farsad and Dean Obeidallah, follows a group of Muslim-American comedians on a tour across America. 

Dancing the African Diaspora: Theories of Black Performance February 7-9 2014 Duke University
African-American Studies at Duke University / http://aaas.duke.edu

    

For centuries, countless dances were born out of the disbursement of African people.  Dancing The African Diaspora, a new conference at Duke University, explores dances by people of African descent.

RAÇA, a documentary film
racafilme.com / Raca

Brazil is often touted as a racial democracy or a multicultural paradise. More than half of the country's population is of African descent, and there are more than 130 words to describe skin tone. But according to Afro-Brazilian filmmaker Joel Zito Araújo, there is much work to be done in the struggle for racial equality. The scholar-in-residence at UNC's Sonja Haynes Stone Center highlights the challenges in his new film, RAÇA. Host Frank Stasio talks with Araújo and the Center’s director, Joseph Jordan.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

In his annual address to the nation, President Obama discussed raising the minimum wage for federal workers and closing the gender wage gap. He also praised North Carolina's innovation hub.

wikipedia

When we think about the bond between animals and humans, we often think of the "pet-owner" relationship. But animals influence our lives in many other ways: as part of the food supply chain, as therapeutic companions and as cohabitants of our environment. Jeannine Moga, clinical and veterinary social worker at North Carolina State University, explores the imprints animals leave on humans beyond companionship. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with Moga about the relationships between animals and humans.

Archibald Motley is one of the most well-known painters of the Harlem Renaissance even though he never lived in Harlem. He spent most of his career documenting the nightlife scene in both Chicago and Paris.

Motley's images explode with color. Reds, blues greens. It's almost impossible to look away. Yet his work is not widely available to the public. Many of his most important creations are held in private collections. But now, 42 works from 1919 to 1960 are on display at Duke University's Nasher Museum.

Jennifer Ho, English professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
englishcomplit.unc.edu / UNC-Chapel Hill

When Jennifer Ho went to the hospital for testing on a lump in her breast, she encountered the image often associated with breast cancer: the pink ribbon.

A nurse led the UNC English professor to an exam room. She recalls, "And then I saw a tote bag with UNC hospital's name on it and the pink ribbon. And I had this immediate visceral reaction. And I'm walking with the nurse. And I said something I can't repeat on the air." Ho said, "I hate those *** pink ribbons."

Book Cover for Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing, Literature by Karla Hollway
dukeupress.edu / Duke University Press

From enslavement to the one-drop rule to the three-fifths compromise, United States law has defined African-American identity. Duke University professor Karla Holloway is exploring how black fiction connect racial identity and the creation of law for African Americans. 

Black and White photograph of Workers Marching in Roanoke Rapids
south.unc.edu

    

In the 1970s, the small town of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina was dominated by the J.P. Stevens textile mills, which controlled many aspects of its workers' lives. 

Triad Update

Jan 21, 2014
The lunch counter where Greensboro students staged a civil rights sit-in protest on display in the National Museum of American History in Washington DC.
Wikipedia author RadioFan

 Franklin McCain, civil rights activist and one of the Greensboro Four, died this month. 

Drew Perry's new book Kids These Days looks at the anxieties of parenthood.
Algonquin

    

When North Carolina author Drew Perry and his wife were having conversations about having children, he was utterly terrified. 

Dmitry Sikovetsky performs Diamonds in the Rough program aat the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra.
J Henry Fair

    

  Musician, arranger and conductor Dmitry Sitkovetsky has performed across the globe: from Ajerbaijan to Moscow and Los Angeles to New York. 

University of North Carolina Press

  

North Carolina’s politics have made national headlines lately as the traditionally Democratic state elected a Republican majority in the legislature and a Republican governor. The policy shift to the right might surprise those who think of the Old North State as a democratic stronghold. 

Police Training
Nashville.gov

In the early morning hours of November 19, Durham  youth Jesus Huerta left home. His family called 911, reported him as a troubled runaway and noted his drug problem. A Durham police officer located Huerta, frisked him, cuffed him, and put him in the back of a cruiser. Moments later, the 17 year-old was dead from a gunshot to the head. His family questions the circumstances surrounding his death.

Friends and relatives posted pictures like these of Jesus Huerta around Durham, NC
Leoneda Inge

  

Jesus Huerta died from a gunshot wound while in police custody last November. Did officers know he was at risk of killing himself? The teen's family says yes.

Durham authorities have said the officer on the scene, Samuel Duncan, had not been told the 17-year-old threatened to kill himself and used drugs before the officer picked him up the morning of Nov. 19.

But the attorney representing Huerta’s family questions that and points to this radio communication in which officers talk about Huerta having a history of drug abuse:

In 1960, Elizabeth Spencer became a southern literary icon with the release of her novella, "The Light in the Piazza." The film version of the book starred Olivia de Havilland.

More than fifty years after her acclaimed Italian love story, Spencer is still writing.  Her newest collection of short stories is "Starting Over" (Liveright, 2013).

All of the narratives in the book stem from her two southern homes: Mississippi and North Carolina.

Anna Rose Beck
Anna Rose Beck / annarosebeck.com

When singer-songwriter Anna Rose Beck last appeared on our show, she was trading engineering studies at Duke University for a full-time career as a musician. Now she is fully devoted to her musical career and her newest album, Glass House in Outer Space, garnered a lot of support on the crowd-funding website Kickstarter.

Anna Rose Beck performs live in-studio, and talks with Frank Stasio about her new album. She is joined by Elana Scheiner on cello and Marc Harkness on guitar.

The Editor and the Dragon
south.unc.edu / Southern Oral History Program

A new film debuts on UNC-TV tonight, Thursday January 9th. "The Editor and The Dragon: Horace Carter Fights The Klan" tells the inside story of a man of courage, the journalist Horace Carter.

Filmmakers describe the story this way:

Mark Kleinschmidt
http://www.townofchapelhill.org/ / Town Of Chapel Hill

  

Haben Girma was the first deaf-blind student to graduate from Harvard Law.
Harvard Law

At the age of 15, Haben Girma had danced, skied, kayaked and traveled to Mali. And although that’s a lot for any young person to experience, Haben was doing so while deaf and blind.

Eliana Perrin, MD, MPH, and professor of Pediatrics at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine. sitting in a movie theater
http://news.unchealthcare.org/ / UNC Healthcare and school of medicine

    

Movies like Toy Story 3, Wall-E, and Up, may seem like harmless entertainment. But a new study shows these films may promote unhealthy behavior, especially eating habits, to young people. 

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