Nancy Wang

Digital Intern

Nancy Wang is WUNC's very first Digital Intern. Nancy will graduate in May 2014 from UNC's School of Medicine. Nancy is headed to Stanford to do her residency in June. She will specialize in urology. Nancy is a skilled writer and is passionate about medical/science journalism. She contributes to The Charlotte Observer and North Carolina Health News among other outlets.
 

Pages

Science & Technology
8:26 am
Mon June 9, 2014

STORY UPDATE: How A Mind-Controlled Robotic Suit Will Kick-Start The 2014 World Cup

A teen wearing an exoskeleton may kick off soccer's biggest event.
Credit Walk Again Project / virtualreality.duke.edu

Earlier this year we brought you a story about the connection between a mind-controlled robotic suit and soccer's World Cup. We have updated the story at the bottom of the page.

Original story:

The upcoming World Cup is sure to go down in the history books even before the competition starts.  This year, a paralyzed teen will use a mind-controlled robotic suit to help stand, walk and make the opening kick to the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

Read more
Science & Technology
11:30 am
Fri June 6, 2014

LISTEN: Phoebe Judge Interviews 14 Year-Old Chapel Hill Inventor, Two Patents

Chase Lewis, 14-year old inventor with two life-saving patents and more to come.
Credit Michelle Lewis

In the last few years, Chase Lewis has patented two life-saving inventions, been a finalist in five national science competitions, and earned the Presidential Volunteer Service Silver Award. Oh, and he’s only 14 years old.

Lewis, who is homeschooled, has long been interested in science and inventions.

“My grandfather was an aeronautical physicist who worked on the Apollo program,” Lewis said. “I’ve gotten to spend some time with him, and we talk about science and inventions all the time.”

Read more
Business & Economy
3:21 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

LISTEN: This Is What Your Voice Should Not Sound Like In A Job Interview

Could your voice be holding you back in the office?
Credit Bureau of IIP, flickr.com / Flickr/Creative Commons

When you go into a job interview, you’re being judged on so many different things - far more than your knowledge of the industry. Many employers asses how you dress, your body language, how enthusiastic you are. For some women a new Duke study shows that even your voice may play a factor. 

Read more
Arts & Culture
12:38 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

[PHOTOS] Explore These Abandoned Homes Of North Carolina

This picture is featured prominently on Michelle Bowers' Facebook page, Abandoned Homes of North Carolina
Michelle Bowers

Home is where the heart is and for many abandoned homes and barns around Franklin County, the echoes of these past lives is what prompted Michelle Bowers to start a photo collection which documents the abandoned homes of North Carolina.

“I’ve always hated history in school but this seems like a way to get back into history,” Bowers said.

Read more
Arts & Culture
4:30 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Noah Stewart Brings His Tenor Talent to the Triangle

Noah Stewart is not your average opera singer–he’s young, he’s black, he’s openly gay . But he’s exactly the person to update opera for the 21st century.

As an African American kid growing up in Harlem, opera was not an obvious career choice. Raised by a single mom, Stewart was encouraged to get involved in any and all after-school activities, so in junior high, Stewart joined the school choir. From there, he fell in love with opera and went on to study at The Julliard School of Music on a scholarship.

Read more
Health
4:02 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Interviewing My Hero And UNC Commencement Speaker Dr. Atul Gawande

Nancy Wang with UNC commencement speaker Dr. Atul Gawande.
Credit Thania Benios Health and Science Editor at UNC

It’s not often that you get the chance to interview your personal hero on the day you become a doctor, but yesterday, I got to do just that. Minutes after I graduated from UNC School of Medicine, I had the chance to speak with UNC commencement speaker Dr. Atul Gawande. Dr. Gawande is a Harvard surgeon, best-selling author and has been named one of the world’s 100 most influential thinkers by TIME magazine. His acclaim comes from his ability to write about health care problems in a way that is easy to understand and powerful enough to effect change.

Read more
Health
10:25 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Not Enough Doctors? How The Medical Education System Is Contributing To The Shortage

U.S. Navy Ens. Frank Percy, right, a physician’s assistant, works alongside a medical student.
Credit Seaman S. C. Irwin, United States Navy

It is a great time to become a physician in the U.S. There is a growing need for doctors of all kinds, so if you invest in medical school, chances are, you will find a job. By the end of this decade, it’s projected that the country will be short 90,000 physicians.

Read more
Science & Technology
12:26 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Measles, Mumps And Polio, Oh My! Anti-Vaxxers Bring Back Diseases, Nothing's Changing Their Minds

Typhoid Vaccination
Credit Library of Congress CALL NUMBER: LC-USW36-828 [P&P] Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

In April of last year, a North Carolina resident developed a fever and rash shortly after returning from a trip to India. He had contracted measles abroad, and by the end of May, the North Carolina Division of Public Health identified 22 more cases of measles in the area. Many of those infected, including the initial patient, had not been vaccinated against the disease.

Read more
Science & Technology
5:00 am
Sat March 15, 2014

How Speed Dating And A Nobel Prize Determines the Next Generation Of Doctors

Medical School Residency Match Day
Credit Guillermo Cabrera-Rojo / Flickr/Creative Commons

Next Friday, over 17,000 U.S. medical students will find out exactly what kind of doctor they will become. The process is called ‘the match’, and it works more like high-stakes speed dating than a job application process. 

During the last year of medical school, much like in high school, medical students apply to residency programs across the country. The programs then send invitations to select applicants to interview at their institution.

For some residency fields such as family medicine, students may only have to interview at a handful of institutions because there are more spots than there are U.S. students applying for that field. But for many other fields, such as plastic surgery or ophthalmology, students often interview at 15 or more places in order to have a good chance at matching. The process takes up to 3 months and can cost thousands of dollars. (Students are expected to pay these costs themselves.) 

Read more
Science & Technology
3:27 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Printing Organs with Stem Cells And Two Other Ways NC Projects Might Save The World

Dr. Anthony Atala
Credit Screen Shot from his TED Talk

With the abundance of universities, industry and research companies, it's no surprise that North Carolina is a leader in innovation. Here are three cutting-edge medical and science advancements developed locally that may soon have global effects.

1. Printing Organs with Stem Cells

Read more

Pages