Meghan Modafferi

Producer, The State of Things
Diya Abdo headshot
http://www.guilford.edu/about/faculty-staff/profile/index.aspx?linkid=370&moduleid=17

 

Growing up as a Palestinian in Jordan, Diya Abdo straddled multiple cultures. Her love of American literature brought her to the United States. 

Eric Chance / Appalachian Voices

 When a stormwater pipe burst in Eden, N.C. on Sunday, more than 80,000 tons of coal ash rushed into the Dan River. The waste from the retired Duke Energy coal-fired power plant poses possible threats to humans and wildlife in the region. Host Frank Stasio discusses the coal ash spill and its ramifications with WUNC reporter Jeff Tiberii.

Book cover depicting the bearded Rabbi of Worms
https://wipfandstock.com/store/The_Rabbi_of_Worms

The 11th century isn’t noted in history for its peaceful interfaith relations. And yet, at that time, Christians and Jews alike came from all over Europe to seek the wisdom of the Rabbi of Worms, a French scholar whose commentaries on the scriptures are still used today. Host Frank Stasio talks to writer Marie Hammond about her historical fiction, "The Rabbi of Worms."

Author Wiley Cash smiling outside
photo by Tiffany B. Davis http://www.wileycash.com/

Wiley Cash's latest novel, "This Dark Road to Mercy," is set in his hometown  of Gastonia, N.C. 

The Old Well at UNC-Chapel Hill.
unc.edu

The athletic program at Carolina came under scrutiny when academic advisor and tutor Mary Willingham made her research on athlete literacy public.

João Ritter is the musician Élève.
www.elevemusic.org

João Ritter combines his technical computer skills with his musical ear to record, mix and master his own tracks.

David Pizarro black and white photo, laughing
http://www.peezer.net/

  

Feelings of disgust can be a useful in navigating environmental threats. When we are disgusted, we avoid contaminated or poisonous things. But new research shows that disgust may also subconsciously influence our political and moral judgments. Psychology professor David Pizarro examines the ways disgust affects decision-making in the political realm.

Creative Commons

The Meredith College Documentary Film Festival offers movies made by women that address a wide range of topics.

 Filmmaker Joan King Widdifield's "Rainy Season" explores the lingering damage of the Vietnam War. Kristin Bedford's film, "Field Notes, Durham Noir" is an aesthetic interpretation of the tobacco town. Host Frank Stasio talks with Widdifield and Bedford about their work. Both films will be featured at the Festival on Sunday, January 26th.

 

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