Lindsay Foster Thomas

Producer, "The State of Things"

Ways to Connect

www.stumaddux.com

Abuse and neglect at the hands of hired caregivers are very real concerns for the elderly. But for gay seniors, these can be even bigger problems as they face discrimination within the healthcare system. A new film called “Gen Silent” examines the challenges of being out and aging. Host Frank Stasio gets a preview from filmmaker Stu Maddux before the film screens in Cary and Chapel Hill this weekend.

www.reverbnation.com/thbullfrogwillardmcghee

Musician “Th’ Bullfrog” Willard McGhee has nothing but respect for the blues greats of the Piedmont. In fact, McGhee would love to see more being done to honor blues pioneers like Blind Boy Fuller and Floyd Council. Their legacies live on in McGhee’s music. His new CD project, recorded with fellow blues guitarist Tad Walters, is called “Stealin’ Gasoline.” In the tradition of blues, the songs are personal and poignant and sometimes racy.

The word “cult” comes from a Latin root word that translates into “ritual.” But in the modern era, the word has acquired derogatory connotations – used to describe spiritual, political or social groups that challenge conventional beliefs. In North Carolina, police are investigating the possibility of a connection between two missing persons and a Durham congregation that has been characterized as a cult. Could use of that word in the news coverage of the case influence its outcome? Host Frank Stasio examines public perception of new religious movements with James Tabor, chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Sean McCloud, an associate professor of religious studies and American studies affiliate at UNC-Charlotte; Benjamin Zeller, an assistant professor of religious studies at Brevard College; and Lisa Kerr, founder of the Web site www.mycultlife.com. Listener Call-in.

Haroon Moghul
themaydan.org

The Muslim Student Association at Duke University is presenting a series of lectures by experts on Islam with the goal of generating positive dialogue about Muslims in America. This year’s “Islamic Awareness Month” comes on the heels of Congressional hearings examining the spread of radicalism and extremism in Muslim communities across the U.S.

Derrick Allen
newsobserver.com

Last week, Durham Superior Court Judge Orlando Hudson publicly criticized the State Bureau of Investigation’s handling of a 1998 murder case, saying the SBI withheld evidence that could have aided the defendant in trial. The case of Derrick Allen, who spent 12 years in jail for the sexual assault and murder of a 2-year-old girl, is the latest to bring attention to the SBI’s policies and procedures at its crime lab.

At the corner of Angier Ave. and Driver St. in Durham sits Joe’s Diner. The special there is a 1 lb. all-beef hot dog, but what’s really special about the place is the relationship between its owner, Joe Bushfan, and the restaurant’s financier, Dan Hill. The unlikely partnership between Bushfan, a former celebrity bodyguard, and Hill, an insurance broker, started as a chat about business investments and has grown into an effort to revitalize East Durham’s neighborhoods.

Members of adolescent social cliques tend to dress alike, talk alike and share the same interests. But, a new study out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that more dangerous behaviors – specifically engaging in nonsuicidal self-injury – are also contagious among friends. UNC psychology professor Mitch Prinstein joins host Frank Stasio to talk about investigating seemingly infectious harmful behaviors among young peer groups.

Department of Homeland Security
Department of Homeland Security

Congressional hearings to investigate the “radicalization of Muslims in America” begin today on Capitol Hill. The hearings, called by New York Rep. Peter King, who is the Republican chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, are being criticized as racist for singling out the Muslim community in an exploration of homegrown terrorism.

The North Carolina Gazetteer
The North Carolina Gazetteer

Historian William S. Powell first assembled “The North Carolina Gazetteer” in 1968. The book has since served as an essential reference for readers with an interest in the state and the fascinating stories that are attached to places like Frying Pan, Hanging Dog, and Naked Mountain. Powell’s book has recently received an update with help from Michael Hill, research supervisor at the North Carolina Office of Archives and History.

It took Raleigh resident Mary Lambeth Moore decades to tease her intriguing short story about sisters in a small North Carolina town during the mid-1970s into a novel. The result is "Sleeping with Patty Hearst" (Tigress Publishing/2011), an intriguing book that follows a teenager named Lily as she navigates identity and community in 1975 and 1976.

www.marrydurham.com

A big event is in the works for those who want to show their pride and support for the city of Durham, North Carolina. On March 19th, residents and non-residents can take part in a group ceremony to “marry” the Bull City. Donations collected for the event will sponsor five local charities.

www.songsofwater.com

Greensboro-based instrumental ensemble Songs of Water blends sounds and rhythms from around the world with a Tar Heel touch. The band’s tunes are influenced by the dominant percussion heard in West African, Indian and Middle Eastern music and their songs are driven by melodic use of a hammered dulcimer.

A new play that explores male identity draws inspiration from jazz music. Playwright Kuamel Stewart’s “Kind of Blue” asks theater goers to consider different perceptions of masculinity with a narrative set in 1940s New York City. Stewart, a senior communications major at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is the first African-American undergraduate to have a full-length production performed on a UNC mainstage. “Kind of Blue” debuts this week at the Historic PlayMakers Theatre.

Your digital life has a life of its own. Whether you’re on Facebook, Flickr, Twitter or linked in to any social network server, it’s likely that your online existence will outlive you. Authors John Romano and Evan Carroll started thinking about what happens to people’s online presence once they die. They found that much of the information – from emails and blog postings to financial records and photographs – is at risk of being lost forever in cyberspace. Their book, “Your Digital Afterlife” (New Riders Press/2010), tells readers how to preserve and protect their online legacies.

The Sunset Limited
triadstage.org

The latest production at Greensboro’s Triad Stage is Cormac McCarthy’s “The Sunset Limited,” a production with a small cast – just two men – and an extended conversation about big ideas including life, death, afterlife, faith and fate.

Of the 600 million people who know how to play chess worldwide, Phiona Mutesi is one of the best. The 14-year-old Ugandan phenom recently competed in the Chess Olympiad, an international tournament that pits players against each other in strategic competition. A short time ago, Mutesi had never even heard of the game.

person
www.nccomedyarts.com

For more than 30 years, stand-up comedian Emo Philips has been entertaining audiences with his hilarious one-liners, unique fashion sense and child-like persona. The funny man brings his signature brand of wicked humor – one that’s influenced Jim Carrey, Demetri Martin and Mitch Hedberg – to the 10th annual North Carolina Comedy Arts Festival this week and stops by the studio to yuk it up with host Frank Stasio.

Robert Griffin
Robert Griffin

Pianist Robert Griffin makes social commentary and sets it to music. He’s taken on corporate irresponsibility, corrupt government, genetically engineered foods and 24-hour cable news networks in his jazzy compositions. Griffin’s latest CD is called “Ain’t My Kind of Strange.” He joins host Frank Stasio to talk about his music and play a few songs live in the studio.

Durham Central Market
Durham Central Market

Durham Central Market, a community grocery store cooperative, lets local investors build social and financial capital in the construction of a downtown supermarket. Host Frank Stasio speaks with Project Manager Don Moffitt and Robin Arcus, a board member and Durham Central Market co-founder, about the co-op, which is scheduled to open in 2012.

Spaulding family seal
spauldingfamily.com

About 700 members of the Spaulding family will descend on Raleigh, NC next week for the clan’s 18th bi-annual reunion. The Spauldings can trace their roots to Duplin County where Benjamin Spaulding, a freed slave, married Edith Delphi Jacobs, a Lumbee Indian, in the early 19th century. The Spauldings have ties to the founding and success of dozens of the state’s institutions like North Carolina Mutual Life insurance company, Mechanics & Farmers Bank and Lincoln Hospital.

Picture of Russian Duo: Terry Boyarsky & Oleg Kruglyakov
russianduo.com

The balalaika is a traditional Russian instrument with three strings and a triangular body. Oleg Kruglyakov, a native of Omsk City, Siberia, has been playing the balalaika since he was seven years old. Now, he's devoted to educating other cultures about Russian folk music and testing the limits of his instrument by teaming up with pianist Terry Boyarsky.

Cassilhaus
Frank Konhaus and Ellen Cassilly

A love of collecting photography led Frank Konhaus and Ellen Cassilly to include an art gallery in their dream home. Then the couple decided that they wanted to do more than just display art. They wanted to build an in-home studio space for artists to create in. Cassilhaus, the name of Frank and Ellen's dwelling, fulfilled their dream. Now, invited artists from all over the world come to their home to write, paint, sculpt, dance or just generate ideas for upcoming projects.

In the late 1800s, North Carolina's favorite mountain retreat was home to a progressive African-American community that founded the Young Men's Institute. It remains the country's oldest free-standing African-American community center.

Jazz artist Branford Marsalis
courtesy of the artist

Saxophone master and Durham resident Branford Marsalis has never shied away from a challenge when it comes to tackling music.  The jazz legend's latest undertaking incorporates his sax into the classical music traditions of South America in a show called "Marsalis Brasilianos: Villa Lobos, Milhaud and the New Worlds of Brazilian Modernism."  

When Lindsay Foster Thomas landed her job as a producer for WUNC’s midday program "The State of Things," she moved from New York City to Durham with a long "to-do" list.   After finding a place to live, mapping her route to work, and checking out the best places to eat, she focused on choosing her doctors.  As part of our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," she explains her choices.

More information:

North Carolina Institute of Medicine report

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