Lindsay Foster Thomas

Producer, "The State of Things"

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The State of Things
12:10 pm
Thu April 21, 2011

The Music Of Wade Mainer

Wade Mainer

Wade Mainer, a banjo master and bluegrass legend, turns 104 today. Host Frank Stasio celebrates Mainer's life and legacy with Dick Spotswood, Sarah Bryan, and David Holt.

Just about every bluegrass musician has been directly or indirectly influenced by Wade Mainer. Mainer, a master of the banjo, taught himself to play his instrument of choice as a child and developed an innovative two-finger picking style. That style, combined with Mainer’s strong vocals earned him popularity as a performer and recording artist in the 1930s and 1940s.

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The State of Things
11:58 am
Tue April 19, 2011

Death Penalty Data

Robinson joins host Frank Stasio to share more information about his report and talk about how this data could affect policymakers’ ideas about the death penalty.

North Carolina halted executions about five years  ago. Capital punishment is still legal in the state, but a dispute over the lethal injection process led to a de facto moratorium on the death penalty. Since then, the state’s murder rate has fallen, and investigations of the State Bureau of Investigation’s crime lab have
exposed mishandling of evidence in criminal cases. Matthew Robinson, a professor of government and justice studies at Appalachian State University, has been researching those facts and other data about the death penalty in North Carolina. His findings reveal that capital punishment is more costly than life imprisonment and that race and gender frequently factor into death penalty sentencing.

The State of Things
11:53 am
Tue April 19, 2011

30 Americans

Soundsuit
Credit www.ncartmuseum.org

Host Frank Stasio discusses the exhibit with his guests.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being labeled an “African-American artist”? That question is at the heart of a new exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Art. It features the works of 31 contemporary artists - photography, video, sculpture and more – with each piece revealing a bit about the experience of blacks in America.

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The State of Things
12:39 pm
Fri April 15, 2011

Mount Moriah

Mount Moriah

McEntire, Miller and Will Hackney join host Frank Stasio to perform live and talk about how love, family and Christianity all play influential roles in their music.

Mount Moriah is a Southern folk music band based in Durham, North Carolina. Their self-titled debut CD has rich lyrics that tackle themes such as reconciliation, religious symbolism and gender identity.

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The State of Things
10:03 am
Tue April 12, 2011

The Civil War Day-By-Day

Letter written on April 12, 1861

Tim West and Biff Hollingsworth join host Frank Stasio to talk about blogging through the Civil War.

A team of local library archivists are taking on a lengthy digital project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Every day for the next four years, they will contribute written content to a blog that features artifacts, photographs and documents related to the war. Online users can visit the Web site called “The Civil War Day-By-Day” to see what was happening during the war on a particular day and everything available to view on the blog is housed in the Wilson Special Collections Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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The State of Things
12:14 pm
Fri April 8, 2011

The Eldest Jackson

Rebbie Jackson

Rebbie Jackson joins host Frank Stasio to talk about her advocacy, her music and her family.

The Jackson family holds an important place in American music.  Its eldest child, Rebbie, has had a successful career as an entertainer that included her 1984 hit song, "Centipede," which was written by her brother, Michael Jackson. 

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The State of Things
12:02 pm
Wed April 6, 2011

Reading The Language Of Rape Culture

How we articulate ideas about rape sheds light on American perceptions of violence, gender and race.

Most cases of rape and sexual assault never make the news. But in recent weeks, horrific stories about victims of sexual violence have created national headlines. Some language used in the reporting of these cases and public reactions to them has caused controversy. How we articulate ideas about rape sheds light on American perceptions of violence, gender and race. Host Frank Stasio discusses the language and the law surrounding rape with a panel of guests including documentary filmmaker Aishah Shahidah Simmons; Mark Anthony Neal, a professor of African and African-American Studies at Duke University; Melissa Harris-Perry, associate professor of politics and African-American Studies at Princeton University; and Mary R. Block, associate professor of history at Valdosta State University.

The State of Things
1:50 pm
Fri April 1, 2011

Fast Food North Carolina

North Carolina has a far-reaching reputation for its farm fresh, home-cooked cuisine. So, it may surprise you that quite a few fast food restaurant chains have Tar Heel State roots.

North Carolina has a far-reaching reputation for its farm fresh, home-cooked cuisine. So, it may surprise you that quite a few fast food restaurant chains have Tar Heel State roots. On today’s show, host Frank Stasio takes a look at the success stories of national franchises like Hardee’s, Bojangles’ and Krispy Kreme as well as regional chains including Cook-Out, Char-Grill and Snoopy’s. Joining the conversation are fast foodies Blair Chancey, editor of Quick Service Restaurant Magazine, and Andrew F. Smith, author of “The Encyclopedia of Junk Food and Fast Food.” Also joining the discussion are Burney Jennings, President/CEO of Biscuitville; Eric Newman, executive vice president of Bojangles’ Famous Chicken ‘n Biscuits; Kenny Moore, founder of Andy’s Burgers, Shakes and Fries; and Tom Barbitta, vice president of marketing for Cheerwine.

The State of Things
1:02 pm
Thu March 31, 2011

Remembering Margaret H. Turner

Margaret H. Turner

Today, host Frank Stasio remembers the life of a civil rights hero with Durham entrepreneur Beverly Washington Jones, a retired professor of history.

Margaret H. Turner fought vigilantly for civil rights in Durham, North Carolina in the 1960s by recruiting local students to join the March on Washington, mentoring NAACP youth, and enrolling her own children in a previously all-white school as a way to bring balance to an unequal education system. Turner passed away last week at the age of 93.

The State of Things
12:53 pm
Thu March 31, 2011

YahZarah

YahZarah joins host Frank Stasio for a live, in-studio performance and to talk about working with the Grammy-nominated group The Foreign Exchange.

“Mama’s Gun” is the critically-acclaimed sophomore CD from neo-soul artist Erykah Badu. The project was released 10 years ago and featured background vocals from a teenage singer who called herself YahZarah. That teenager is all grown up now and after touring with Badu and recording two studio projects of her own, YahZarah has reinvented herself for her third CD, “The Ballad of Purple St. James.” YahZarah joins host Frank Stasio for a live, in-studio performance and to talk about working with the Grammy-nominated group The Foreign Exchange and how she defeated the music business in the battle for creative authority of her own music. YahZarah will perform a benefit concert for Durham Nativity School on Saturday, April 2, 2011 at 8 p.m.

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