Laura Pellicer

State of Things Producer

Laura Pellicer
Credit Tammy Jean Lamoureux

Laura Pellicer is a producer with The State of Things, a show that explores North Carolina through conversation.

Laura was born and raised in Montreal, Quebec, a city she considers arrestingly beautiful, if not a little dysfunctional. She worked as a researcher for CBC Montreal and also contributed to their programming as an investigative journalist, social media reporter, and special projects planner. Her work has been nominated for two Canadian RTDNA Awards.

Laura loves looking into how cities work, pursuing stories about indigenous rights, and finding fresh voices to share with listeners. Laura is enamored with her new home in North Carolina—notably the lush forests, and the waves where she plans on moonlighting as a mediocre surfer.

Ways to Connect

Jordan Green / Triad City Beat

Triad City Beat Senior Editor Jordan Green spent a year investigating housing ownership in lower income neighborhoods of High Point, North Carolina.

Host Frank Stasio speaks with Green about the racial lines of poverty in lower income neighborhoods, and how nearly more than 80 years of racial economic housing policies has limited access to loans and squashed opportunities for upward mobility for many African-Americans in High Point. 

Courtesy Rob Dunn

The banana is always in season and always available at the grocery store. A new book explores how the prevalence of the popular fruit is a model for the dangers of a food system that is increasingly dependent on fewer food staples.

“Never Out Of Season” (Little, Brown, and Company/2017) by biologist Rob Dunn, a professor in the department of applied ecology at North Carolina State University, walks readers through the precarious corporate food system and explains how diversity is crucial to crop survival.

Joan Marcus, 2016

Ariana DeBose has been moving up in the Broadway world by leaps and bounds. The North Carolina native got her start in showbiz with a role on the television show "So You Think You Can Dance" when she was only 18 years old. Just a few years later, she became one of the original ensemble cast members of the hip-hop Broadway sensation "Hamilton.”

Betsy Blake / American Friends Service Committee

Juana Luz Tobar Ortega is a mother of four and grandmother of two who has lived in Asheboro, North Carolina for more than 20 years. Tobar Ortega works, pays taxes, and is active in her local church. She is also undocumented. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement ordered Tobar Ortega to return to her native Guatemala by the end of May 2017. Instead, Tobar Ortega made the radical decision to take refuge at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Greensboro, where the vestry voted to shelter her and protect her from deportation.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

The North Carolina House outlined a $22.9 billion spending plan that calls for about $350 million in tax cuts. It allots funding for pension adjustments for state retirees and $181 million for teacher raises. 

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

Film remakes can introduce a beloved film to a new audience or take a mediocre movie to a new level of greatness. But when a remake is badly executed, it can butcher a cherished classic. On this edition of “Movies on the Radio,” film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes pick apart the artistry of a remake.

An image of veteran farmer Alex Sutton
Courtesy Alix Blair

Note: this segment is a rebroadcast from November 10, 2016.

A new documentary explores the personal journey of North Carolina veteran and Purple Heart recipient, Alex Sutton. Sutton carves out a life as a farmer after three military combat tours in Iraq. But his path to healing is marked by stark contrasts between bucolic farm life with his wife and children, and the challenge of grappling with both post-traumatic stress disorder and his own post-war identity.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

President Donald Trump jets around the world on his first foreign trip while back in the U.S., the G.O.P.’s American Health Care Act is under review. The Congressional Budget Office released a report this week that claimed 23 million Americans would be left uninsured under the new plan.


BJ Leiderman
Paul Howey

BJ Leiderman has made a career of creating the well-known jingles for NPR shows like Morning Edition. But Leiderman has also lived a double life and spent his nights jamming in rock ‘n’ roll bands, often writing original songs.

Steven Caras

African-American women have fought against discrimination in the ballet world for decades. Debra Austin was the first black ballerina to become a principal dancer in a major American dance company. She broke through the racial barrier, but her career was not without challenges.


AFRICAN AMERICAN DANCE ENSEMBLE, INC.

Acclaimed dancer and choreographer Chuck Davis died earlier this month at the age of 80. Davis was considered America’s master of African dance. He formed the Chuck Davis Dance Company in New York in the 1960s and later built the African American Dance Ensemble in Durham.

Keyboardist Jonathan Lim (front left) of Washington, D.C. and music producer Brandon Collins of Raleigh explore the sounds of the synth keyboard.
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

Music producers, artists, and the future-curious explored art installations, talks, and concerts during Moogfest in downtown Durham. The festival celebrates artists who use technology to produce innovative sounds and visual art.

MIDDLE WEST MANAGEMENT

Phil Cook has become a fixture in the Triangle music scene since moving to North Carolina from Wisconsin more than a decade ago. His love for collaboration means he has lent his writing, production, and multi-instrumental skills to countless projects.

An image of Sammy Bananas playing at Moogfest in Asheville, 2014
Moogfest

Synthesizer enthusiasts, music lovers, and technophiles have descended on downtown Durham for the second Moogfest in the North Carolina city. The four-day festival from May 18 to 21 seeks to promote artists who lean on innovative technologies to produce visual and multimedia art and music.

Courtesy CERN

In a cavern 100 meters below the surface of the earth, physicists are constructing the universe – theoretically at least. Physicist Kate Shaw is a researcher studying CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. She works specifically on the 7,000 ton ATLAS detector that is investigating fundamental particles. 

Terry McCombs / Flickr Creative Commons

A new report from the Youth Justice Project shows that public school students in North Carolina lost 1 million days to school suspensions in the 2015-2016 school year. According to the report, the rate of short-term school suspensions is increasing, and disproportionately affects African-American students, boys, and students with disabilities.

Charlie Thompson / www.homeplaceunderfire.org

In the 1980s, rising interest rates, decreased farm prices, and misguided federal policies led to a crisis that hit farmers across the nation. Many farmers were either forced to sell their properties or driven to foreclose.

State Senate chamber
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

The North Carolina Senate released their $22.9 billion spending plan earlier this week. The budget has significant implications for the state’s education system. It shifts how teacher raises are allocated and proposes a $600 million increase in education spending.

arianta / Flickr

A well-executed remake film can bring a beloved story to a fresh audience. But when a remake is done wrong, it can leave faithful viewers cringing.

For the next Movies On The Radio, The State of Things wants to know what are the best and worst remake films? 

Courtesy Monica Berra/ Soul City

Like many utopian societies, Soul City was a dream that was doomed to fail. It was the brainchild of civil rights leader Floyd McKissick who wanted to build a haven of racial equality for nearly 20,000 people. Construction for the project began in the Piedmont region of North Carolina in the 1970s, but constant bureaucratic battles led to its demise.

University of South Carolina Press

Theories abound regarding why famed writer Ernest Hemingway shot and killed himself in Idaho in 1961. Some claim he suffered from bipolar disorder or that he had depression. But in the new book “Hemingway’s Brain” (University of South Carolina Press/2017), psychiatrist Andrew Farah offers a new theory.

Gate City Divas / www.gatecitydivas.com

The Gate City Divas are a female-led blues group made up of seasoned singer-songwriters from the Triad. The group had an unconventional start; they were awarded a grant to record an album of original songs by Greensboro-based female performers. After completing the project and releasing the album “Goin’ To Town,” they decided to form a full-fledged band.

Terrestrial Podcast / kuow.org

Many people are aware of the way human choices are changing the planet. But how is the planet shaping the big and small choices people make everyday? The new podcast “Terrestrial” from NPR member station KUOW traces the decisions people make based on the environment, like a couple’s decision not to have children because of rising global population, or the exploration of composting as an eco-friendly way of processing dead bodies.

Sarah Sneeden / Viking/Penguin Publishing

For nearly 20 years, Ann B. Ross has written about the lives of the outspoken Miss Julia and her band of friends. They live in the fictional town of Abbotsville.

The newest novel in the Miss Julia mystery series takes the book’s heroine to the coast where a hurricane bring both chaos and surprising treasures. Ross lives in Hendersonville, North Carolina, and her town has provided endless inspiration for the characters and content of her work.

McGuire's Miracle The Documentary

Alexander Julian is credited with the iconic revamp of Tar Heel sports uniforms. But his journey to creating the legendary Carolina blue argyle was a long time in the making. Julian drew up his first designs when he was a child, and he started working the sales floor at his father Maurice Julian’s haberdashery when he was in his teens.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

 

This Saturday marks 100 days in power for the Trump administration. The Trump team is touting the president’s accomplishments, which include job creation efforts and national security measures. A significant number of these measures were instituted through executive orders or memorandums, a maneuver for which Republicans criticized former President Obama.

Barry Lam / hiphination.org

 When professor Barry Lam needed a break from the college classroom, he set out to turn his scholarly passion into a podcast. “Hi-Phi Nation” uses investigative journalism and narrative storytelling to peer inside under-explored philosophical question.

By Source - Fair use March for Science

Tens of thousands of scientists are expected to descend on Washington, D.C., this Saturday for the March for Science. Partner marches are set up in more than 500 cities around the world to bring together scientists and science supporters. Threats to budget cuts at the National Institutes of Health, and the Trump administration’s position on scientific research have galvanized the march movement.

Courtesy North Carolina Opera

Georges Bizet’s “The Pearl Fishers” is an opera that pits the dynamics of a love triangle against the union of brotherhood. The opera, set in historic Sri Lanka, then Ceylon, features one of the most famous duets in opera history. The North Carolina Opera presents their interpretation of “The Pearl Fishers,” an opera that was only popularized long after Bizet’s death.

Joe Wolf / Flickr Creative Commons

Dystopian films take viewers to cities in the sky and barren, post-apocalyptic landscapes. They explore futuristic universes while also tapping into the darker side of the human condition. 

In this episode of "Movies on the Radio," listeners discuss their favorite dystopian films. Host Frank Stasio talks with experts Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about how dystopian art emerges from societal reaction to politics and government.

Laura Boyes will host a screening of the 1930 Film "King of Jazz" at Friday, April 21 at 8 p.m. at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. 

And on May 5, you can catch Marsha Gordon at a special screening of The Big Red One at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh. 

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